Planet ODF

May 25, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

ClareTheSharer: Undid revision 663735382 by 201.151.120.32 (talk) Both are still in widespread use, despite no longer being maintained

Undid revision 663735382 by 201.151.120.32 (talk) Both are still in widespread use, despite no longer being maintained

← Previous revision Revision as of 18:36, 25 May 2015
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*[[Okular]]
 
*[[Okular]]
 
*[[OnlyOffice|ONLYOFFICE]]
 
*[[OnlyOffice|ONLYOFFICE]]
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*[[OpenOffice.org]]
 
*[[Scribus]] imports .odt and .odg
 
*[[Scribus]] imports .odt and .odg
 
*[[SoftMaker Office]]
 
*[[SoftMaker Office]]
  +
*[[Sun Microsystems]] [[StarOffice]]
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />

by ClareTheSharer at May 25, 2015 06:36 PM

Apache OpenOffice Blog

LibreOffice 5.0 continue son ménage et joue la continuité - Next INpact


Next INpact

LibreOffice 5.0 continue son ménage et joue la continuité
Next INpact
À une époque où cette dernière était jugée stagnante, la Document Foundation a été créée pour servir deux objectifs : reprendre le code d'OpenOffice pour le moderniser et l'enrichir, et travailler sur le standard ODF (Open Document Format). Après ...

and more »

May 25, 2015 09:00 AM

May 24, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

201.151.120.32: /* Application support */ defunct

Application support: defunct

← Previous revision Revision as of 00:28, 24 May 2015
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*[[Okular]]
 
*[[Okular]]
 
*[[OnlyOffice|ONLYOFFICE]]
 
*[[OnlyOffice|ONLYOFFICE]]
*[[OpenOffice.org]]
 
 
*[[Scribus]] imports .odt and .odg
 
*[[Scribus]] imports .odt and .odg
 
*[[SoftMaker Office]]
 
*[[SoftMaker Office]]
*[[Sun Microsystems]] [[StarOffice]]
 
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />

by 201.151.120.32 at May 24, 2015 12:28 AM

May 23, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Microsoft faces claims it threatened MPs with job cuts in constituencies ... - HITC


HITC

Microsoft faces claims it threatened MPs with job cuts in constituencies ...
HITC
The government's standard is now open document format (ODF), which means files can be opened with free software, rather than commercial products. A Microsoft spokesperson said: “We have looked into the nearly decade-old matter and we don't recognise ...

and more »

May 23, 2015 05:49 AM

May 22, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Microsoft faces claims it threatened MPs with job cuts in constituencies - The Guardian


Softpedia News

Microsoft faces claims it threatened MPs with job cuts in constituencies
The Guardian
The government's standard is now open document format (ODF), which means files can be opened with free software, rather than commercial products. A Microsoft spokesperson said: “We have looked into the nearly decade-old matter and we don't recognise ...
Microsoft bullied MPs over government switch to open source standardsInquirer
Microsoft Accused of Blackmailing UK Officials Supporting Open Document FormatSoftpedia News
Microsoft 'Threatened MPs' Over Open Standards PolicyTechWeekEurope UK

all 16 news articles »

May 22, 2015 03:41 PM

Adviser: Microsoft 'Threatened MPs' Over Open Standards Policy - TechWeekEurope UK


Adviser: Microsoft 'Threatened MPs' Over Open Standards Policy
TechWeekEurope UK
The Conservatives proposed the open-standards policy in 2007, while still in opposition, and began the process of implementing it when brought into the coalition government in 2010. It took effect last year, making the Open Document Format (ODF) the ...

and more »

May 22, 2015 12:06 PM

Steve Hilton: Microsoft szantażował brytyjskich posłów, którzy chcieli ... - PCLab.pl


PCLab.pl

Steve Hilton: Microsoft szantażował brytyjskich posłów, którzy chcieli ...
PCLab.pl
Microsoft od lat sprzeciwiał się projektowi związanemu z wprowadzeniem formatu ODF w urzędach. Nic w tym oczywiście dziwnego – w końcu Office to jedna z głównych sił napędowych przedsiębiorstwa, a otwarty format otwiera możliwość rywalizacji także ...

May 22, 2015 11:49 AM

Firma Microsoft byla obviněna, že "vyhrožovala britským poslancům" - Britské listy


Firma Microsoft byla obviněna, že "vyhrožovala britským poslancům"
Britské listy
Nynější standard britské vlády je Open document format (ODF), což znamená, že soubory lze otevřít softwarem, který je k dispozici zadarmo a uživatel k tomu nepotřebuje kupovat komerční produkty. Firma Microsoft konstatovala, že k Hiltonovu tvrzení ...

May 22, 2015 10:14 AM

Microsoft Accused of Blackmailing UK Officials Supporting Open Document Format - Softpedia News


Softpedia News

Microsoft Accused of Blackmailing UK Officials Supporting Open Document Format
Softpedia News
We will close local facilities, Microsoft execs allegedly threatened when ODF was proposed as the new format for govt. The IT reform that the United Kingdom is working on is faced with strong opposition from tech giants operating facilities and doing ...

and more »

May 22, 2015 09:36 AM

May 20, 2015

Planet KDE

Protocols Plugfest Europe 2015

Last week I had the pleasure of speaking at Protocols Plugfest Europe 2015.  It was really good to get out of the bubble of free software desktops where the community love makes it tempting to think we’re the most important thing in the world and experience the wider industry where of course we are only a small player.

This conferences, and its namesakes in the US, are sponsored by Microsoft among others and there’s obviously a decent amount of money in it, the venue is a professional conference venue and there’s a team of people making sure small but important details are taken care of like printed signposts to the venue.

What’s it all About?

In 2008 Microsoft lost an EU antitrust case because they had abused their monopoly position in operating systems.  This required them to document their file formats such as MS Office and protocols such as SMB.  This conference is part of that EU requirement meaning they have to work with anyone who wants to use their formats and protocols.  They have a website where you can file a request for information on any of their documents and protocols and everyone said they were very responsive in assigning engineers getting answers.

Since 2008 Microsoft have lost a lot of ground in new areas in the industry such as mobile and cloud.  Because they’re not the dominant player here they realise they have to use formats and protocols others can use too otherwise they lock themselves out.

The Talks

I spoke about Interoperability on the Linux Desktop which seemed well received, the reason Linux desktop hasn’t taken off is there are many other systems we need to interoperate with and many of them don’t want to interoperate with us. (Of course there are financial reasons too.) It was well received with many people thanking me for a good talk.

I went to talks by people working on Samba, LibreOffice and Kolab which all gave pleasing insight into how these project work and what they have to do to workaround complex proprietary protocols and formats.  LibreOffice explained how they work with OpenDocument, they add feature and for any feature added they submit a request for it to be added to the standard.  It’s a realistic best practice alternative.

I went to a bunch of Microsoft talks too about changes in their file formats, protocols and use of their cloud service Azure.

The inter-talks

It was great meeting some people from the free software and MS worlds at the conference.  I spoke to Christopher about how he had been hired to document SMB for MS, to Dan about taking over the world, to Miklos about LibreOffice and many others.  On the MS side I spoke to Tom about file formats, Darryl about working with Linux, to Jingyu about developing in MS.

I hope I won’t offend anyone to say that there’s a notable culture difference between the open source and the MS sides.  Open Source people really do dress scruffy and act socially awkward.  MS people reminded me of the bosses in Walter Mitty, strong handshakes, strong smiles and neat dress.

culture difference

One part of the culture that depressingly wasn’t difference was the gender ratio, there was only half a dozen women there and half of those were organising staff.

The Microsoft people seemed pretty pleased at how they were open and documented their protocols and formats, but it never occurred to them to use existing standards.  When I asked why they invented OOXML instread of using OpenDocument I was told it was “MS Office’s standard”.  When I asked if Skype protocols were open they seemed not to know.  It probably doesn’t come under the EU court requirements so it doesn’t interest them, but then all their talk of openness is for nothing.  When I suggested Skype should talk XMPP so we can use it with Telepathy I was given largely blank faces in return.

Talking to Samba people and OpenChange people about my opinion that their products should be stop gaps until a better open protocol can be used was met with the reasonable argument that in many cases there are no better open protocols.  Which is a shame.

I went into the MS testing lab to test some basic file sharing with Samba and reminded myself about the problems in Kubuntu and discovered some problems in Windows.  They had to turn off firewalls and twiddle permissions just to be able to share files, which was something I always thought Windows was very good at.  Even then it only worked with IP address and not browsing.  They had no idea why but the Samba dudes knew straight away that name browsing had been disabled a while ago and a DNS server was needed for that.  Interesting the MS interoperability staff aren’t great at their own protocols.

Zaragoza

I had a great time in Zaragoza, only spoiled by travellers flu on the last day meaning I couldn’t go to the closing drinks.  It’s on the site of a 2008 world fair expo which feels like one of those legacy projects that get left to rot, 2008 wasn’t a great year to be trying to initiate legacy I think.  But the tapas was special and the vermut sweet.  The conference timetable was genius, first day starts at 9:00 next at 10:00 and final at 11:00.  The Zentyal staff who organised it was very friendly and they are doing incredible stuff reimplementing exchange.  It’s lovely to see MS want to talk to all of us but they’ve a way to go yet before they learn that interoperability should be about an even playing field not only on their terms.

 

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by Jonathan Riddell (riddell) at May 20, 2015 04:06 PM

UK Government

News story: Invitation to Tender - Construction of the UK Returnee Reception Centre, Lagos

This invitation is open to building engineers, construction companies and building contractors that have extensive experience in the construction industry.

You are invited to submit bids for the construction of a Returnees reception centre facility at the Cargo terminal of the Murtala Mohammed International Airport, Ikeja Lagos.

More detail on the projects themselves and the bidding process can be found in the attached documents. Further technical documents are available on request.

Any questions or concerns on the content or process of tender should be directed to Yvonne Onabolu or Kelechi Emukah in the Migration delivery team. All tenders or questions should be submitted via email to Yvonne Onabolu or Kelechi Emukah

The application process opens on 18 May 2015, and will close on 18 June 2015.

Tender for the UK Returnee Reception Centre (ODT, 69.6KB)

May 20, 2015 10:46 AM

May 19, 2015

UK Government

News story: Ending Modern Slavery in Nigeria - Invitation to Tender

The British High Commission is today opening two invitations for tender to NGOs, relevant charities or private sector organisations to bid for public enlightenment projects on ending Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking in Nigeria, from Nigeria, by Nigerians. The British High Commission also invites invitations to bid for projects to support victims of Human Trafficking in Nigeria

More detail on the projects themselves and the bidding process can be found in the attached documents.

The application process opens on 13 May 2015, and will close on 13 June 2015.

Invitation to Tender (ODT, 67.7KB)

SPF 2013 F001 Project Concept Form (ODT, 14.8KB)

ABB (ODS, 10.4KB)

May 19, 2015 11:04 AM

May 18, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

KasparBot: embed authority control with wikidata information

embed authority control with wikidata information

← Previous revision Revision as of 03:45, 18 May 2015
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{{Authority control}}
 
[[Category:OpenDocument]]
 
[[Category:OpenDocument]]
 
[[Category:Open formats]]
 
[[Category:Open formats]]

by KasparBot at May 18, 2015 03:45 AM

May 13, 2015

UK Government

Guidance: Call for Bids in Ethiopia: Bilateral Programme Budget

The deadline for submission of applications is 31st of May 2015. However, early application is highly encouraged.

About the Bilateral Programme Budget

The Bilateral Programme Budget is one of the channels through which UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) finances projects to strengthen ties with the Ethiopian government and contribute to creating lasting peace, security and democracy in Ethiopia.

Key Points to Consider When Applying

1. Project Period

This is a one year project proposal call. The financial year of the BPB is 01 April 2015 - 31 March 2016. All projects must be completed within this financial year. Funding of projects in the next financial year is not guaranteed.

2. Budget

The budget to be allocated to one project can fall under the following ranges.

  • £5000 – £10,000

  • £10,000 - £15,000

  • £15,000 – £20,00

3. Capital Goods and Administrative Costs

The Bilateral Programme Budget fund does not authorise the purchase of capital goods. Minimal percentage of administrative costs may be allowed on case by case basis.

4. Pre-payment

Pre-payment is not a common practice in the FCO. There needs to be a strong justification if pre-payment is required.

Who Can Apply?

  • Government Institutions

  • Legally Constituted Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs)

  • Civil Society Organisations

  • Community-based Organisations

  • Universities and Research Centres

BPB Funding Priorities

Project concepts that are best fit to our strategic objectives and have a potential to achieve the programmes’ desired outcomes, will be successful.

The concept bid submitted should establish a clear and identifiable link between the activities planned and the expected results, in one of the following thematic areas of the strategic objective:

Strategic Objectives and Thematic Areas

Promote democratic values and good governance by encouraging a culture of open debate in Ethiopia, as well as supporting young Ethiopians to develop their leadership skills.

How to Submit Bids, Selection Criteria and Process

This process will be carried out in three stages

First Stage: The Concept Bid Stage

Applicants submit their concept papers in the attached format Project Concept Form and send via the following e-mail address: AddisAbaba.Projects@fco.gov.uk) to the attention of the BPB Officer by 31st May 2015.

Second Stage: The Full Proposal Stage

Approved concept bids will be presented to the Programme Board for a second and final round selection. Potential implementers will then be contacted by the BPB Officer to develop a full proposal.

Bids will be assessed against the following criteria

  • Alignment with the BPB strategy

  • Evidence of local demand or need

  • Value for money

  • Project viability, including capacity of implementing organization(s)

  • Project design, including clear, achievable outcomes

  • Sustainability

Successful Non-governmental organisations will be asked to submit their valid registration certificate by the Ethiopian Charities and Societies Agency at this stage.

Third Stage:

Final outcomes will be notified to all bidders in the second stage.

Implementation of project will commence if/once both parties sign the FCO Grant /Commercial contract.

Key documents

Project Concept Form

This file is in an OpenDocument format

Project Concept Form

Bidding FAQs

This file is in an OpenDocument format

Bidding FAQs

May 13, 2015 01:10 PM

Corporate information: Working for British Embassy Tehran

All current employment opportunities with the British Embassy in Tehran are listed in this section and advertised on www.irantalent.com. References will be required. Only applicants invited for interview will be contacted. We are unable to respond to unsolicited CVs or general requests for employment information. Your e-mail and attachments must not exceed 300kB in size . Interested candidates should forward the following documents to: tehran.recruitment@fco.gov.uk. Please include your name and job reference in the subject heading.

  • CV
  • Application form
  • Cover Letter stating why they feel they have the necessary skills to perform well in the position they are applying for

Current Vacancies:

Post Security Manager B3L

This file is in an OpenDocument format

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email webmaster@fco.gov.uk . Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Application form

This file is in an OpenDocument format

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email webmaster@fco.gov.uk . Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

The British Embassy Tehran is an equal opportunities employer. Our policy on local staff recruitment is to select the best candidate for the job through a fair, open and valid selection process.

May 13, 2015 09:22 AM

May 12, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: Provide drink-drive rehabilitation scheme courses

Updated: Updated 'list of drink drive rehabilitation course providers'.

Find out how to take a drink-drive rehabilitation course if you’ve been found guilty of a drink-drive offence.

Foreword

The opportunity for those convicted of relevant drink offences to attend an approved course is derived from recommendations in the Road Traffic Law Review Report (North, P. 1988) and these are reflected in sections 34A to 34C of the Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988 (RTOA) as amended by the Road Safety Act 2006.

The recommendations led to the creation of the Drink-drive rehabilitation scheme (DDRS), an introduction to which is in part 1 of this document. Under the DDRS, the Secretary of State approves courses for the rehabilitation of drivers and part 2 of this document sets out the approach to the approval process.

Under section 34C (1) RTOA the Secretary of State may issue guidance as to the conduct of approved courses. Such guidance sets out the minimum requirements for course content and delivery and is set out in part 3 of this document. Failure to follow this guidance may result in the withdrawal of course approval.

Additionally part 4 of this document sets out the role of the court and this may assist in promoting consistent application and administrative procedures in the operation of the scheme by courts in England and Scotland.

This document is produced by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA). It replaces the Department for Transport (DfT) guidance of September 2010.

Other documents to read

Documents to be read in conjunction with the course guidance are:

You can read the following legislation on the legislation.gov.uk website:

Introduction and aim

This document is comprised of 4 parts and is intended to have application only in England and Scotland:

  • part 1 - “Introduction and aim” is an introduction to the Drink-drive rehabilitation scheme (DDRS) and sets out its aim
  • part 2 -“Approval of DDRS courses”sets out the approach of the Secretary of State, acting by way of DVSA, to the approval of courses under the DDRS
  • part 3 - “The conduct of approved courses” consists of guidance to providers of approved DDRS courses in England and Scotland issued under the Secretary of State’s powers in section 34C (1) of the Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988 (RTOA)
  • part 4 - “The role of the courts” explains the role of the courts and is intended as a brief guide to their role in relation to the DDRS for those providing courses and those attending them

Note: In this guide, in relation to England and Scotland, ‘courts’ applies to Magistrates and Crown Courts in England and, in Scotland, Sheriff and District Courts (when constituted by a Stipendiary Magistrate) plus the High Court of Justiciary, unless there is specific reference to ‘supervising court’.

Since 1 January 2000, courts throughout Great Britain have had the power to refer a person to an approved Drink-drive rehabilitation course if convicted of a drink-drive related offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 (RTA), and for which the court has disqualified them from driving for at least 12 months. The relevant sections are:

  • 3A - causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs
  • 4 - driving or being in charge when under the influence of drink or drugs
  • 5 - driving or being in charge with excess alcohol
  • 7 - failing to provide a specimen

The new section 34A RTOA expands the range of drink-related offences which fall within the DDRS and these are now referred to as ‘relevant drink offences’. This new section 34A is, in respect of relevant drink offences, fully in force on 24 June 2013. At the time of sentencing for a relevant drink offence a court may make a referral order, reducing the period of disqualification by not less than three months, and no more than one quarter, of the disqualified period on satisfactory completion of a DDRS course.

DDRS courses offered must be approved by the Secretary of State (section 34A(6) RTOA). The courses are intended to offer an educational opportunity to those convicted of relevant drink offences, in order to reduce the likelihood they will reoffend. The approved DDRS courses are not available to those who have committed drug-drive offences.

The significance of the guidance in section ‘The conduct of approval courses’ is twofold: under section 34C(1)(a) RTOA, course providers must have regard to it. Failure to follow this guidance may result in the withdrawal of course approval. Under section 34C(1)(b) the courts shall have regard to the guidance when deciding whether any instructions or requirements of a course provider are reasonable.

The responsibility for the DDRS in Scotland remains with the Department for Transport (DfT).

The responsibility for the DDRS in Wales resides with the Welsh Assembly Government.

This DDRS does not apply to Northern Ireland (NI), but similar statutory arrangements are in place in NI, enabling convicted and disqualified drivers to be offered a referral to a drink-drive related training course approved within NI. There are no reciprocal arrangements between NI and mainland UK for referring offenders. In practice, this means that where a relevant offence is committed in one jurisdiction, the court is unable to refer the offender to a DDRS, or similar, course in the other jurisdiction.

The aim of the DDRS is to provide drink-drive offenders with appropriate education to help them recognise the problems associated with drink-driving. The information and experience provided by the course is intended to enable individuals to change their behaviour, in order to prevent further offending. It is intended to reduce reoffending and contribute positively to improved road safety.

Following the nationwide expansion of the scheme in January 2000 the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) was commissioned by DfT to monitor the operation of the scheme and to evaluate its effectiveness and the courses provided by individual organisations TRL report number 613. The research found that there was a marked benefit to all offenders undertaking a DDRS course.

The TRL report also demonstrated that offenders who had not attended a DDRS course were between 2 and 3 times more likely to reoffend than those who had undertaken a course. This figured applied up to 2 years after the initial conviction.

Section 34A (5) RTOA enables a court to make an order reducing the period of disqualification if, by a specified date, an offender satisfactorily completes a course approved by the Secretary of State.

The purpose of an approved DDRS course is to enable those convicted of certain drink-driving behaviour to benefit from an educational opportunity designed to discourage drink-drive related reoffending, and thereby contribute to reducing road casualties by improving decision making and driving behaviour.

No course has been approved for the purposes of drug-driving rehabilitation.

Approval of DDRS courses

DDRS courses can only be approved by the Secretary of State who, as mentioned, acts by way of the DVSA in this respect. Organisations will be able to submit an application to deliver DDRS courses at any time. Applicants considered suitable to provide courses will be granted course approval. Written feedback will be provided to those not granted course approval. DVSA will consider all applications for course approval based on the published DDRS Course Approval and Quality Assurance Model.

Where the course meets the relevant criteria to be approved, the approval will be granted for a period of up to 7 years, enabling delivery of the approved course in the ‘specified area or areas’ forming part of the application. Successful applicants will have been required to demonstrate their capability to provide sufficient courses for the demand across the entire geographical area for which they are approved; this will be a condition of approval.

Beyond the initial approval it is open to the provider of an approved course to subsequently apply for course approval in another specified area(s), however this will attract a further application fee. Applicants should not assume requests for approval for course provision in another or a different specified area will receive automatic approval. The application requirements referred to above will need to be satisfied for the other or different area(s) requested.

The conduct of approved courses

Attendance at an approved course is dependent on the court making an order to that effect. To assist the courts in referring offenders, course providers might usefully engage with courts and defence lawyers to ensure they are fully briefed on the details of the approved course, including details of locations where courses are held.

The list of approved course providers in this guidance document shows the current active course providers by specified area, and contains a summary of each provider’s course, locations, course fee and format, together with contact details for the organisation. These details are published on the GOV UK website for reference by courts, participants and other interested parties.

Course providers are encouraged to build close working relationships with courts in their approval area, in order to maximise the referral of offenders to the DDRS.

This might include:

  • making course information freely available to promote the value of the DDRS to offenders, such as the supply of information leaflets about course availability, fee(s) and location, for the court’s waiting room
  • holding liaison meetings with courts’ representatives
  • offering training to new and existing magistrates, sheriffs and courts’ administrative staff and local solicitors, to promote the value of the scheme in reducing reoffending

Where a course provider receives a court referral, the provider should contact the referred offender as soon as possible. The court referral will include the current address and contact details given to the court during the hearing. Contact should be confirmed (or initiated) as soon as possible after receiving the referral from the sentencing court, to encourage the highest possible rate of course ‘take-up’.

The court sentencing process can be complex for those unfamiliar with it. Therefore in addition to making an initial contact with referred offenders, providers may wish to adopt further pro-active practices to maximise course attendance by sending further letters, emails, texts or other communication to those who have made no contact since their initial referral, in sufficient time to enable the offender to comply with the DDR course completion deadline.

It is advisable to make clear to the offender in the initial contact that courses are normally delivered in English. The communication might also ask if the individual concerned has any special requirements. In order to facilitate access to referred offenders whose first language is not English, and those who have a hearing difficulty, course providers should take reasonable steps, where necessary, to accommodate their requirements. This could include the use of an interpreter or signer.

In providing an interpreter, it is acceptable for the offender to be accompanied by a family relative (over 18 years) to provide translation, however the provider may wish to ensure the interpreter is capable of translating adequately to meet the learning needs of the offender. Some providers have historically used contracted interpreters and it may be possible for providers in general to share these resources.

The presence of an interpreter can, however, be distracting to the rest of a course group. Therefore, to minimise disruption, it is suggested that allowing the use of more than one interpreter per course is likely to be disruptive. Nothing in this guidance prevents a provider enhancing the learning opportunity for participants who do not have English as a first language, where local need requires it, by running a dedicated course in an alternative language, assuming that a suitable trainer, course materials and suitable facilities are available.

Course providers are to verify the identity of course participants to guard against identity fraud. This will include completion of an initial registration form, requiring course participants to provide such details as:

  • their full name and address, including post code
  • date of birth
  • court sentence and, where appropriate, the alcohol level at the time of the offence

These supplied details can be verified during the training delivery against the offender details received from the court.

Providers may also require the production of nationally-recognised documents containing the individual’s signature or photograph such as a passport. In addition, other documentation such as a utility bill, mobile telephone bill or benefits documentation may satisfy the provider. Many course providers require offenders to sign a course register as proof of attendance at each course session.

Where an offender who is offered the DDRS course elects to undertake it in a different area to that in which the sentencing court is located, the court will send details of the offender to the supervising court for that area. It is recognised that a court may not be familiar with DDRS course providers in all parts of the country. Therefore, in order to assist courts in selecting an approved course provider, they should be referred to the list of approved course providers which can be found on the GOV UK website.

If, following the issue of a referral order to a course provider, an offender requests to undertake the course in a different specified area not covered by the receiving provider, the course provider need not return the order to the court. In practice, many transfers are arranged between course providers in the best interests of the offender and this is usually acceptable to the courts. In such cases, the original course providers should ensure that the supervising court is notified formally of the change of provider. All course providers and offenders will have access to the list of approved course providers to assist when transferring a referral order.

Course fees

The maximum course fee is currently £250 and this includes consideration of payment processing charges such as cheque, direct debit and credit card payments, BACS transfer or instalment payments. It is important to ensure the fee for attending an approved DDRS course is maintained at a level which is affordable for the large majority of offenders. If fees are set too high this may result in a low take up as described on page 23 of the TRL report number 613 and the courts may be unable to refer offenders in sufficient numbers to make courses viable.

It is for the course provider to decide the course fee level (beneath the maximum fee ceiling) to meet their business model. Course providers should make this information publicly available by notifying DVSA of the fees for inclusion in the list of approved course providers details. The list of approved course providers are encouraged to keep the fee structure as clear as possible, ideally no more than a full fee, a lower rate for concessionary categories, eg people in receipt of benefits, and a discounted early booking fee, where these options are offered.

Course providers may change the level of course fee originally submitted at course approval by giving DVSA 30 calendar days notice of the proposed change.

A course provider may agree to an offender paying the course fee in instalments, rather than in one single payment. However, the fee must be paid in full before the completion of the course and not exceed the maximum fee.

Where payment is taken by instalment, providers may wish to warn offenders before entering into such an agreement that a certificate of course completion may not be issued if there is a failure to make payment for the course in accordance with section 34B (4) RTOA.

Course providers should not take payment, or place offenders on courses, in advance of receiving a referral order from the court or a transferred order from another provider. If an offender contacts a course provider in advance of their court case or immediately after sentencing but before the referral order is received, the course provider is advised to take the full details and contact the sentencing court directly to check if they are in fact the named course provider. No offender should be encouraged to attend a course or to make payment before the referral order is received from the court. For guidance on the transfer of offenders between course providers after sentencing.

Course delivery

There is no prescribed national model for the delivery of a DDRS course and this approach enables providers a degree of flexibility in detail and delivery. A DDRS course syllabus has been developed with stakeholders, building on the DVSA Safe and Responsible Driving Standard (DVSA, 2010) and this will inform the delivery. Although there may be differences in the approach adopted by providers, all courses are required to meet the learning outcomes of the DDRS course syllabus and the standards described in this guide.

As demonstrated in the DDRS Course Approval and Quality Assurance process , the approved DDRS course content will need to demonstrate clear links to the desired outcome of the DDRS syllabus. Providers of approved courses will also be required to satisfy the Secretary of State that delivery of training is to a level of competence consistent with, or comparable to, recognised delivery standards consistent with the course approval.

Offenders attending the course are likely to come from a variety of backgrounds and have different learning styles. Course materials therefore might usefully be presented using a variety of techniques, in consideration of the differing learning styles in seeking to ensure offenders are positively and actively engaged, such as:

  • short talks to convey essential information
  • group discussion and participation
  • self-observation forms/records of behaviour, eg ‘drinks diaries’
  • exercises for individual and group discussion, including role play
  • audio/visual presentations
  • guest speakers, for example subject specialists, magistrates, police, other emergency services, victims of drink-drivers
  • information hand-outs
  • behaviour analysis, assessing performance and setting objectives

Course providers are given the freedom to construct the delivery of their DDRS course to meet the learning outcomes of the DDRS syllabus within the following parameters:

  • not less than 16 hours total tuition time, not including breaks
  • minimum of 3 sessions
  • course sessions to be spread across a period of at least 14 days
  • not less than 4, and not more than 20 participants in any course session
  • best practice being for each course to be facilitated by at least 1 trainer to 15 offenders

Where acute or individual circumstances require an exception to the parameters above; including exceeding the recommended ratio it is necessary to notify DVSA by submitting an exception request in order that it can be recorded for compliance and quality assurance purposes. Details of the exception request process can be found at Annex G.

The delivery of the DDRS course syllabus and the opportunity for offenders to develop knowledge and understanding is best served by the learning taking place in a group environment. It is unlikely the same benefits can accrue from training conducted on a ‘one-to-one’ basis.

Complete courses or individual sessions delivered as a one-to-one intervention are not generally acceptable to the scheme. In addition, and to ensure the participant is not disadvantaged, any ‘catch up’ sessions, whether forming part of a programmed course or created separately to cater for clients who have missed course sessions, should also be based on group learning principles.

DVSA recognises the achievement of the scheme’s outcomes rely to a considerable extent on the knowledge, skill, attitude and behaviour demonstrated by course trainers. DVSA require that all DDRS training staff are suitably qualified or have recognised relevant experience.

DDRS trainers may have been recruited to the role from a variety of backgrounds and learning experiences. Many will have been required to demonstrate competence in other adult learning environments which readily map to the DDRS trainer competence framework, or are currently actively working to build the evidence to achieve a recognised adult learning qualification as outlined in the DDRS course approvals information.

The DfT commissioned Competence Assured Solution (CAS) in 2008 to develop a competence framework for trainers and best practice guidance on the recruitment, training and professional development of training staff. The availability of these documents should enable DDRS course providers to consider best practice in creating more robust systems for recruiting DDRS trainers and ensuring they have the necessary knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours to deliver DDRS courses consistently and effectively.

The CAS trainer guidance documents may be found on GOV UK as follows:

Guidance for DDRS training providers

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Professional skills for delivering the DDRS

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Summary of project deliverables, detailed improvement plans and next steps

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In addition to ensuring the ongoing quality of training staff, course providers will also need to monitor the input by guest speakers to ensure the content and presentation style are appropriate to the aims of the course and align with the course approval. Such elements will also be assessed by DVSA as part of the quality assurance visit. For example, where an external training resource is being engaged, eg Fire Service, Police or Magistrate, the course provider may wish to reassure themselves the training resource has a level of delivery competence consistent with the course approval, as this will form part of the quality assurance assessment. Where the resource does not have recognised qualification or proven experience, the DDRS trainer may find it appropriate to be present throughout the session delivery.

For the purposes of quality assurance, continuous professional development and the promotion and development of the scheme, it may be necessary for an individual not directly involved in the delivery of the course to request attendance in an observational role. DVSA accepts that so long as no offender who is a participant on the course has objected to the presence of the observer, and the permission is freely sought, an observer should be allowed to join the course to carry out that role.

Where a provider wishes to offer a training course commercially to non-offenders based on the approved DDRS course, providers are reminded that they do so outside the statutory scheme, eg for fleet drivers, and no powers contained within the scheme can be relied upon. DVSA would encourage the use of the approved course for the wider development of driver education and the promotion of road safety.

DDRS courses intended for offenders should be restricted to offenders only.

Course providers may make minor changes to the content and delivery methods of approved courses at any time, provided their course remains consistent with the course approval and does not breach the course guidance. Any other changes deemed significant, such as a change in contact time, may not be introduced without prior notice to allow for the course approval alteration to be recorded.

If there is any doubt as to whether prior approval is required for a proposed change to the course, providers should consult DVSA. Course providers should ensure that DVSA and, as necessary, the courts they serve, are notified immediately of any changes to course or contact details.

Reporting

DVSA will assess the quality and delivery of the approved course using a combination of existing reporting mechanisms, such as the quarterly and annual DDRS reports in addition to assurance visit reports and other sources of information, eg complaints processes and court referral analysis. It is intended that a condition of course approval is that DVSA must be allowed access to any course session for compliance and quality assurance purposes.

The quarterly performance and financial report to DVSA includes the number of referrals received from the court and the number of offenders successfully completing a DDRS course during the period. It will also include the calculation of the per-capita fee to enable DVSA to collect the appropriate fee from the course provider.

The statutory deadline for reporting the quarterly performance and financial data is no later than 14 days after the close of the relevant quarter. A template for reporting is provided at Annex D.

The submission deadline for annual reports is the end of January following the relevant calendar year. A template for annual reporting is provided at Annex C.

In addition to performance and financial reporting the annual report should also provide a summary of course and trainer evaluation demonstrating the transfer of learning consistent with the evidential requirements submitted at course approval stage.

Cessation of course provision

Where the provider of an approved course is no longer willing or able to accept referrals from the courts in the specified area, they must notify DVSA in writing of their intention to surrender their course approval and state the date from which this surrender is to take effect. Other than in exceptional circumstances, the course provider should give 3 months’ notice of their intention to DVSA. This notice period will allow for the orderly completion of any outstanding course commitments, provide sufficient time to inform the courts service, amend documentation and, where appropriate consider course approval applications to deliver DDRS courses in the vacated area.

DVSA will consider applications from providers of existing approved courses who are interested in providing their approved course in the specified area(s) served by the outgoing provider.

The incoming and outgoing provider should be prepared to work with each other to minimise any inconvenience to referred offenders. This may include absorbing any outstanding offender commitments from the outgoing provider as well as its historical records. No referred offender should lose the chance to attend a DDRS course as a result of a provider no longer delivering courses.

There is no specific mechanism in the legislation which enables a course approval to be transferred from one course provider to another. In the case of a surrendered approval, DVSA would expect the existing approval to ‘fall’ and look to the existing course approval network to absorb the referrals. It remains open to a new provider to submit an application for course approval for the vacated area.

Where the surrender of the course approval is immediate and no other provider has current course approval for the vacated area, DVSA may offer the vacated area to an existing approved course provider. This will be on a temporary basis in order to prevent a break in provision and loss of opportunity to referred offenders, whilst a formal course approval is sought from interested organisations.

Where the legal status of a course provider changes during the period of approval, the existing approval will cease to be valid and can no longer be used. In such circumstances the new entity should apply for course approval.

The Secretary of State may withdraw DDRS course approval where the course provider breaches a condition of approval, disregards this guidance issued by the Secretary of State, or otherwise fails to meet the required standard.

Where approval is withdrawn as referred to in paragraph 3.40 above, the provider should supply DVSA with details of offenders:

  • awaiting course allocation
  • who are awaiting further communication and/or course confirmation from the provider
  • confirmed on future courses
  • who have partially completed courses
  • who have fully complied with course requirements and not received a certificate of course completion
  • who have failed to respond to communication sent by the provider, or failed to attend or complete a course for which a notice of non-completion is required under section 34B(5) and a certificate of course completion has not been issued

A statutory right of appeal to the General Regulatory Chamber of the First-Tier Tribunal exists for those aggrieved by a decision of the Secretary of State to:

  • refuse an application for course approval
  • grant approval for a course subject to conditions
  • withdraw course approval

Further details of the statutory appeal provisions and process are available from DVSA.

Course attendance and completion

Completion of a course, and the consequent reduction in the period of disqualification, will require attendance and completion of the course in accordance with the course provider’s instructions, payment of the appropriate course fee and compliance with the provider’s reasonable requirements section 34B (4) RTOA.

The provider should ensure that each offender has fully completed each course session and is able to provide evidence of attendance, eg by signed course register. Offenders should complete each of the sessions in a logical sequence to progressively build their learning, unless there are wholly exceptional circumstances, such as illness, which make it impossible to do so, and there are no other course options available. This principle also applies to any ‘catch up’ sessions where a part of a course has been missed for any reason.

There is an expectation that course sessions are conducted in an orderly and effective manner, consistent with the order of the court. For clarity, providers might find it useful to issue to offenders a set of clear course terms and conditions, or rules, with which course members are required to comply. A breach of those terms and conditions may render the offender in breach of the course provider’s requirements and so not entitled the offender to a certificate of course completion as provided under section 34B (4) RTOA.

In supporting the learning environment for all offenders, providers should exercise their discretion in the event of a breach of their terms, conditions or rules, by any offender. Unless the matter is a particularly serious incident and requires immediate exclusion, it should be sufficient to issue a first recorded warning to the person concerned about their conduct, but this should not normally lead to exclusion from the session or course.

Under section 34B(4) RTOA a provider must give a certificate of course completion unless the offender fails to pay the due fees, fails to attend the course in accordance with the course provider’s reasonable instructions or fails to comply with any other reasonable requirements of the course provider.

A course provider may wish to consider immediately excluding a person from further course attendance in the event of them being involved in a serious incident such as verbal abuse or an assault or threat of violence to:

  • the provider or staff engaged by the provider
  • a fellow participant on the course
  • venue staff

Any course member found to have driven to or from a course, and thereby having committed the offence of driving while disqualified should be reported to the police.

Where an offender has not been issued with a certificate of course completion, written notice must be issued in accordance with section 34B(5) RTOA. For consistency across the DDRS, this written notice takes the form of a notice of non-completion Annex B.

Where an offender is excluded, and in consequence thereby does not receive a certificate of course completion, a right exists for the offender to apply to the supervising court to challenge the course provider’s decision not to issue such a certificate under section 34B(6) RTOA.

It is advisable, therefore, for providers to keep an accurate written record of attendance, misconduct, and disruptive behaviour, relating to any warnings issued and any exclusion as this may be required as evidence in court proceedings.

Where an offender completes a course satisfactorily, the course provider is required to certify the completion by the issue of a certificate of course completion and give it to the offender no later than 14 days after the latest date for completion of the course section 34B(4) RTOA.

Although not required under the RTOA, it has become good practice for the provider to send the certificate of course completion on the offender’s behalf to the supervising court, copying it to the offender at the same time.

Course providers are responsible for printing and issuing the ‘certificates of course completion’ and ‘notices of non-completion’ These are available at Annex B.

The certificate and notices will be numbered serially to enable identification of the course provider and to whom a certificate of course completion or notice was issued. The form and content of the certificate of course completion are determined by the Secretary of State. No other form of certificate of course completion is recognised by the court.

It is the offender’s responsibility to apply for a new driving licence before the end of the reduced period of disqualification. This is done using form D1 and D750 which are available from post offices or the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA).

Failure to complete a course

Where an offender does not complete a course satisfactorily, the course provider shall notify the offender of his decision in writing as soon as possible and in any event no later than 14 days after the date specified in the order as the latest date for completion of the course section 34B(5) RTOA.

A ‘notice of non-completion’ has been adopted as the formal notice document of good practice and to enable a consistent standard across the scheme. A copy of the notice of non-completion template is at Annex B.

Written notice referred to in the paragraph above shall be issued to an offender who has failed to:

  • pay for the course
  • attend the course in accordance with the course providers’ reasonable instructions
  • comply with any reasonable requirements of the course provider

The notice of non-completion needs to set out the reason for the decision not to issue a certificate of course completion section 34B(10) RTOA and any other circumstances which contributed to the offender failing to complete the course. The notice will draw attention to the offender’s right under section 34B(6) RTOA to make an application against the course provider’s decision.

Issuing a notice of non-completion in these circumstances should avoid the likelihood of a successful default action under section 34B(6) RTOA against the course provider.

Her Majesty’s Court and Tribunal Service (HMCTS) agree that under current legislation the courts have no power to extend the latest date for completion of a DDRS course following sentence.

Where it is clear that a referred offender will be unable to complete a DDRS course with the specified provider before the latest date for completion, it should be explained to the offender in clear terms that no extension in the deadline date is possible and that the provider will be obliged to issue a notice of non-completion.

This may be avoided if it is possible to arrange for another course provider to provide a course which can be completed by the deadline date without breaching other course requirements. In such circumstances, the sentencing court should be informed of the transfer and the reasons for it.

Notices of non-completion must be sent to each offender who fails to satisfactorily complete the course by the deadline (relevant) date specified in the order, even where there has been no communication from the offender.

Course providers should obtain a certificate of posting for each notice of non-completion that they issue in order that the notice is treated as having been given. This can be in the form of a bulk certificate of posting provided that the name and address of each intended recipient is shown and the date of despatch.

The postal carrier’s endorsement of the certificate is required and the course provider might find it useful to keep the certificate as evidence in the event that an offender claims that a notice of non-completion was not issued.

There is no requirement to copy notices of non-completion to DVLA or to the supervising court as the offender will by default, be required to complete the full period of disqualification imposed during sentencing. However if the court wishes to receive them, copies of the notices of non-completion can be sent to the court by first or second class post.

Complaints and appeals

To assist in the management of complaints made by offenders, course providers should ensure offenders have access to information about the course provider’s complaints procedure. DVSA will make use of this procedure in the first instance in the case of a complaint being made direct to the agency, unless it is inappropriate to do so.

Since an offender may challenge a decision not to issue a certificate of completion it is in the interests of each course provider to be able to show to a court that their reasons for not granting a certificate were properly founded on one or more of the matters set out in above.

Special needs and reasonable adjustments

Course providers are reminded of the obligations under The Equality Act 2010 so as to avoid discrimination against those with disabilities in the provision of approved DDRS courses. In particular, under this legislation ‘service providers’ must make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to remove any barriers that could make it difficult or impossible for people with a disability to access their services. Under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) it is unlawful to treat people with a disability less favourably than others for a reason related to their disability.

The duty to make reasonable adjustments is not unqualified. Course providers should establish whether, in any particular case, they are obliged to make adjustments to assist a referred offender, and what adjustments are reasonable taking into account all the relevant circumstances. Course providers may choose to make adjustments beyond those required by the DDA.

Ultimately, it is for the courts to interpret the law in any dispute over the meaning of a particular legislative provision, and in this case what is ‘reasonable’ in consideration of what adjustments may be necessary. There are, however, a number of sources of advice available to course providers to assist them in reaching an equitable conclusion in each case. Much of this is available from the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

Other statutory obligations

Providers are reminded of their duty of care requirements for offenders attending their courses and are expected to meet their statutory obligations. Course providers are also reminded they have a legal obligation in delivering an approved DDRS course to comply at all times with relevant areas of law applying to their organisation and its activities.

DVSA may withdraw a course approval if breaches of the course provider’s legal obligations are brought to the attention of DVSA, indicating that the provider has ceased to be an appropriate person to provide the course and administer its provision efficiently or effectively.

The role of the courts

Making of referral orders

Courts have powers to make a referral order where an offender is disqualified for 12 months or more on conviction of one of the following offences under the RTA 1988:

  • causing death by careless driving under the influence of drink (section 3A)
  • driving or being in charge of a vehicle when under the influence of drink (section 4)
  • driving or being in charge of a motor vehicle with excess alcohol (section 5)
  • failing to provide a specimen for analysis (section 3A or 7) or to allow a specimen to be tested (section 7A)

The DDRS course is not an ‘approved course’ for those convicted of drug-driving offences only. It is, however, acceptable to refer an individual to an approved DDRS course if he or she had committed an offence involving both drink and drugs. Such an offender could usefully benefit from drink-drive education.

There is no legal bar to offenders being referred on a second occasion to an approved DDRS course. This is a matter for the sentencing court. In England the Magistrates’ Courts Sentencing Guidelines (2008 p.186) state that courts should consider offering the opportunity to attend a course to all offenders convicted of a relevant offence for the first occasion. The court should be willing to consider a further opportunity on a second occasion - it will not usually be appropriate to give an offender the opportunity to attend a third course.

Where an offender is disqualified from driving for a relevant drink offence for a period of at least 12 months, the court may make an order that the period of disqualification shall be reduced if, by the ‘relevant date’, the offender satisfactorily completes an approved DDRS course section 34A RTOA.

The ‘relevant date’ means a date at least 2 months before the last day of the period of disqualification as reduced by the order section 34A (6) RTOA.

The provision of the 2 month period referred to above is necessary for the course completion to be notified to the court, and in turn to the DVLA, so that the reduced period of disqualification can be applied to the driver’s record. For example, a 12 month disqualification, with a 3 month reduction for completion of a DDRS course, enables a reduced period of disqualification to 9 months. Section 34A (6) RTOA requires that an additional 2 months be subtracted from the reduced period (9 – 2 months) giving a ‘relevant date’ for completion as 7 months after the date of conviction.

An order referring an offender to an approved DDRS course will be made at the time of sentencing only and recorded in full in the court register (the court minutes in Scotland). No provision exists in the RTOA for the offender to return to court following the original sentencing to apply for the DDRS course. Nor is there power in the RTOA to extend an existing deadline where the offender has, or is likely to, fail to complete the course before the latest date for completion announced at court during sentencing.

Offenders may only be referred to a DDRS course approved by the Secretary of State section 34A(5) RTOA.

Under section 34A(9) RTOA, before the court makes an order, it is required to ensure that:

  • a place is available on an approved course
  • the offender appears to be of, or over, 17 years of age (referral can be by adult or youth courts)
  • the court has informed the offender (orally, or in writing, and in ordinary language) of the effect of the order, and of the amount of fees the offender is required to pay for the course, and when they must be paid
  • the offender has agreed that the order should be made

Where an offender appeals to the crown court (or an appeal court in Scotland) against the sentence, the court will reconsider the sentence and the order for referral to an approved course. The crown court (or appeal court) will have regard to the effect that any variation of the sentence may have on the validity or appropriateness of the course and the reduction in the period of disqualification allowed on successful completion of the course.

As in the magistrates’ court (or sheriff’s court in Scotland), the exact period of reduction decided upon should be specified in court. An order for referral to an approved course may be made in the crown court (or appeal court) even when no such order has been made in the magistrates’ court. If the crown court (or appeal court) reduces the disqualification period or overturns the conviction, it should inform the course provider and the supervising court accordingly.

It is commonplace for legal advisors and court ushers to assist an offender by providing further information, particularly where the sentencing court’s area is served by several providers, or where the offender requires a course provider in another area. DVSA maintains an up-to-date, list of active approved DDRS course providers which are on the GOV UK website.

In addition to the course and its completion deadline, courts are asked to include, on the courts ‘Libra’ form the offender’s alcohol reading and details of penalties imposed as these are helpful in checking against identity fraud. Courts are encouraged to use the Criminal Justice Secure Mail (CJSM) email system to forward referrals to DDRS providers.

Once a referral order has been made, it is important that the offender and the course provider are notified in writing without delay. Courts are not encouraged to batch referral orders and forward periodically. Any significant delay will reduce the time the offender has available to attend and complete the course by the court deadline.

Delays may also restrict the course options the provider is able to offer the offender. Where different from the sentencing court, the supervising court should also be notified of a course referral. There is no need for a referral order to be copied to DVLA.

Note: ‘Supervising court’ as defined in section 34C (3) RTOA means ‘in England and Wales, if the crown court made the order the Crown Court and otherwise a magistrate’ court acting for the same local justice area as the court which made the order, and (b) in Scotland, the court which made the order.’

When referring the offender, court staff are requested to specify on the referral order whether the offender has any identified special needs identified during the hearing, for example accessibility requirements or where an interpreter has been used in the case, this will ensure suitable arrangements can be made to enable full engagement on the DDRS course.

Since December 2008, courts throughout England have been able to generate course referral notifications through the courts’ information system ‘Libra’. Within Libra, courts should use the following documents:

  • notice of disqualification from driving/endorsement of licence (DRVORD)
  • notice about reduction in disqualification (RDNOTD)
  • notice to course manager (RDNOT)
  • notice to supervising court (RDNOTOC)

The resulting process in Libra will also trigger electronic notification of the disqualification to DVLA and to the police and the Police National Computer (PNC). However, Libra is not designed to record or transmit any updates after the initial result, such as a subsequent reduction in the disqualification period following successful course completion.

The courts’ information system in Scotland, ‘COP II’, currently has no equivalent documents for notification of course referrals. All referrals are therefore notified by the issue of a court order in paper form. Courts should ensure that copies are sent to the offender and course provider at the earliest possible opportunity, in order to maximise the opportunity for the offender to attend a suitable course.

Although made at the time of sentencing, referral to the DDRS is voluntary and an offender may undertake a course at any time, providing it is completed by the completion date. It may be advisable for courts and course providers to take active steps to encourage offenders to undertake courses at an early opportunity, in case unforeseen circumstances endanger course completion before the deadline section 34A (5) RTOA.

Where an offender who is offered the DDRS course elects to undertake it in a different area to that in which the sentencing court is located, the court will send details of the offender to the supervising court for that area. Courts should use Libra document RDNOTOC (notice to supervising court) for this purpose.

There is no separate or additional penalty imposed if an offender agrees to accept a referral order at the time of sentencing and subsequently declines to attend, or is unable to attend a course. In such a case the offender will not receive a certificate of course completion, and will not be entitled to a reduced disqualification period.

The DDRS provider is required to give written notice to the offender of the decision not to issue a certificate of course completion as soon as possible and in any event not later than 14 days after the date specified in the order as the latest date for completion of the course section 34B(5) RTOA. This written notice has been standardised as the ‘notice of non-completion’ recognised across the scheme see Annex B.

High Risk Offenders (HRO) who were referred to an approved course (and whether or not they completed it) are required to satisfy the Secretary of State that they do not have an ‘alcohol problem’, and are fit to drive, before their licence is reissued. This includes submitting to a medical examination by a DVLA approved medical practitioner. Course providers should be prepared to give guidance to those identified by the court as HRO.

Note: High Risk Offenders - Specified in regulation 74 of the Motor Vehicles (Driving Licences) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999 No. 2864): persons disqualified from driving for being two and half times or more over the prescribed limit; for failing without reasonable excuse to provide a specimen for analysis; or for being unfit to drive through drink or driving with an alcohol concentration above the prescribed limit on 2 or more occasions within 10 years.

The National Probation Service in England and Wales currently offers, in some areas only, an intensive supervised programme entitled ‘Drink Impaired Driver’ (DID). This workshop for drink-drive offenders is run over several weeks, attendance at which can be made a condition of a community-based sentence, where the nature of the offence is thought to require a higher degree of intervention.

There is no available reduction in the period of driving disqualification for satisfactory completion of a DID course, as it is not within the DDRS. However, attending a DID course does not prevent a court additionally referring an offender to an approved DDRS course, completion of which would result in a reduction in the period of disqualification.

Subsequent applications to the court by an offender

Where the offender wishes to challenge a decision not to issue a certificate of completion, a statutory option exists. An application may be made to the supervising court by the offender under section 34B(6) RTOA for a declaration against a course provider’s decision not to issue a certificate of completion. The court may issue a summons directing the course provider to attend a hearing to consider the application and the applicant should also be informed of the date of hearing by the court.

In England and Scotland any such application must be made in accordance with court rules. The court will endeavour to ensure that any application is considered promptly so that, if it decides to grant the application, a reduced period of disqualification can still take effect.

If a course provider fails to give either a certificate of completion or a notice of non-completion to the offender within 14 days of the latest date for the completion of a course specified in the order the offender may apply to the supervising court for a declaration that the course provider is in default section 34B (8) RTOA. If the court grants the application, the reduced period of disqualification will apply as if a certificate of course completion had been received by the court section 34B(9) RTOA.

In Scotland the court procedures for applications, such as those under sections 34B(6) and (8) RTOA, are laid down in the relevant rules of court, namely the Act of Adjournal (Criminal Procedure Rules) 1996. The procedure is flexible, but the course provider may be required to lodge written answers to the application before a date for hearing the application is fixed. The period in which any application may be made is 28 days as laid down in the Act of Adjournal.

Where the court has made a decision in the applicant’s favour and orders a reduction in the period of disqualification, and in any case where the disqualification was suspended, it must notify DVLA of its decision under section 34B(11) RTOA. This notification should be made on the same form as for the notification of a reduced period of disqualification following completion of a course and should at the same time be copied to the local PNC bureau.

Appeal by a course provider

A course provider has a right to appeal to the First-Tier Tribunal if aggrieved over the Secretary of State’s refusal to grant course approval, grant of approval subject to condition or withdrawal of course approval.

More information

Contact DVSA if you have any questions about this guidance.

Drink-drive rehabilitation scheme

Drink-drive rehabilitation
Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency
The Axis Building
112 Upper Parliament Street

Nottingham
NG1 6LP

Find DDRS training providers

Annex A: list of approved course providers

Annex A: list of approved course providers

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Annex B: certificate of completion and notice of non-completion

Annex B: certificate of completion

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Annex B: notice of non-completion

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Annex C: annual reporting template

Annex C: annual reporting template

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Annex D: DDRS statistics quarterly returns

Annex D: DDRS statistics quarterly returns

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Annex D: DDRS per capita quarterly template

Annex D: DDRS per capita quarterly template

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Annex D: DDRS course schedule template

Annex D: DDRS course schedule template

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Annex E: a schematic for courts

Annex E: a schematic for courts

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Annex F: National Protocol agreement for the Drink Drive Rehabilitation scheme

Annex F: National protocol agreement for Drink Drive Rehabilitation scheme

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Annex G: Exception request process

Annex G: Exception request process

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Annex G: Exception request process

Annex G: Exception request template

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May 12, 2015 03:06 PM

ODF Wikipedia Page

2A02:FE0:C110:3420:1208:B1FF:FEE2:A8AF: /* Support for OpenDocument */ default text editors for Mac and win support it. think that is significant.

Support for OpenDocument: default text editors for Mac and win support it. think that is significant.

← Previous revision Revision as of 13:05, 12 May 2015
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*The UK government has adopted ODF as the standard for all documents in the UK civil service <ref>{{cite web | url=https://www.gov.uk/government/news/open-document-formats-selected-to-meet-user-needs|title=Open document formats selected to meet user needs}}</ref>
 
*The UK government has adopted ODF as the standard for all documents in the UK civil service <ref>{{cite web | url=https://www.gov.uk/government/news/open-document-formats-selected-to-meet-user-needs|title=Open document formats selected to meet user needs}}</ref>
 
*The [[Wikimedia Foundation]] supports ODF export from [[MediaWiki]], which powers [[Wikipedia]] and a number of other Internet [[wiki]]-based sites.<ref>{{cite web | url= http://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Wikis_Go_Printable | title= Wikis Go Printable | work= [[Wikimedia Foundation]] | date= 13 December 2007 | accessdate= 31 December 2007}}</ref>
 
*The [[Wikimedia Foundation]] supports ODF export from [[MediaWiki]], which powers [[Wikipedia]] and a number of other Internet [[wiki]]-based sites.<ref>{{cite web | url= http://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Wikis_Go_Printable | title= Wikis Go Printable | work= [[Wikimedia Foundation]] | date= 13 December 2007 | accessdate= 31 December 2007}}</ref>
  +
*The default text processing applications in Windows 10 ([[WordPad]]) and Mac OS 10.9 ([[TextEdit]]) support OpenDocument Text.
   
 
On 4 November 2005, IBM and Sun Microsystems convened the "OpenDocument (ODF) Summit" in [[Armonk, New York]], to discuss how to boost OpenDocument adoption. The ODF Summit brought together representatives from several industry groups and technology companies, including Oracle, Google, Adobe, Novell, Red Hat, Computer Associates, Corel, Nokia, Intel, and Linux e-mail company Scalix (LaMonica, 10 November 2005). The providers committed resources to technically improve OpenDocument through existing standards bodies and to promote its usage in the marketplace, possibly through a stand-alone foundation.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://news.cnet.com/OpenDocument-format-gathers-steam/2100-7344_3-5942913.html|title=OpenDocument format gathers steam|author=Martin LaMonica|publisher=CNET News|date=10 November 2005<!-- 4:00 AM PST-->|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> Scholars have suggested that the "OpenDocument standard is the wedge that can hold open the door for competition, particularly with regard to the specific concerns of the public sector."<ref name="papers.ssrn.com">{{cite web|url=http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1656616|author=Tony Casson|author2=Patrick S. Ryan|date=1 May 2006|title=Open Standards, Open Source Adoption in the Public Sector, and Their Relationship to Microsoft’s Market Dominance|publisher= Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> Indeed, adoption by the public sector has risen considerably since the promulgation of the OpenDocument format initiated the 2005/2006 time period.<ref name="papers.ssrn.com" />
 
On 4 November 2005, IBM and Sun Microsystems convened the "OpenDocument (ODF) Summit" in [[Armonk, New York]], to discuss how to boost OpenDocument adoption. The ODF Summit brought together representatives from several industry groups and technology companies, including Oracle, Google, Adobe, Novell, Red Hat, Computer Associates, Corel, Nokia, Intel, and Linux e-mail company Scalix (LaMonica, 10 November 2005). The providers committed resources to technically improve OpenDocument through existing standards bodies and to promote its usage in the marketplace, possibly through a stand-alone foundation.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://news.cnet.com/OpenDocument-format-gathers-steam/2100-7344_3-5942913.html|title=OpenDocument format gathers steam|author=Martin LaMonica|publisher=CNET News|date=10 November 2005<!-- 4:00 AM PST-->|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> Scholars have suggested that the "OpenDocument standard is the wedge that can hold open the door for competition, particularly with regard to the specific concerns of the public sector."<ref name="papers.ssrn.com">{{cite web|url=http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1656616|author=Tony Casson|author2=Patrick S. Ryan|date=1 May 2006|title=Open Standards, Open Source Adoption in the Public Sector, and Their Relationship to Microsoft’s Market Dominance|publisher= Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> Indeed, adoption by the public sector has risen considerably since the promulgation of the OpenDocument format initiated the 2005/2006 time period.<ref name="papers.ssrn.com" />

by 2A02:FE0:C110:3420:1208:B1FF:FEE2:A8AF at May 12, 2015 01:05 PM

May 07, 2015

UK Government

Statistical data set: ENV19 - Quarterly local authority collected waste management statistics

Updated: Updated by more recent quarterly estimates.

This data set covers the provisional quarterly estimates of local authority collected waste generation and management for England and the regions.

If you require the data in another format such as Excel please contact: enviro.statistics@defra.gsi.gov.uk

Quarterly local authority collected waste management statistics from 2010 incorporating July 2014 to September 2014

This file is in an OpenDocument format

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If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email defra.helpline@defra.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

May 07, 2015 08:30 AM

May 05, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: Current Crown Commercial Service suppliers: what you need to know

Updated: Updated URN list

Terms and conditions template

As a guide for suppliers and buyers there is a standard set of terms and conditions for framework agreements and call-off contracts for goods and services bought under the agreement. The template for call-off contracts forms the basis of the terms and conditions in individual further competitions and can be supplemented or refined with additional terms to suit the requirement.

View the model framework agreement (MS Word Document, 329KB) and the model call-off contract (MS Word Document, 402KB)

Submitting monthly management information

All CCS suppliers must submit monthly management information (MI) returns. This is done online through the MISO system. You will need to include the unique reference number (URN) for each customer listed on the return.

Failure to submit MI returns correctly or within the agreed timescales may incur admin fees (MS Excel Spreadsheet, 12.1KB)

Download the latest customer URN list (ODS, 2.7MB)

Please note we are updating the CCS internal Customer Relationship Management system and as a result the weekly downloadable list of URNs will be changing.

The existing sheet of four tabs will reduce to three, listing all live URNs with customer details, a second detailing merges and a third detailing name changes. Legacy tabs will be added for the time being showing older changes that are not present on the new system.

The sub-sector is now known as organisation type and is being updated to better and more accurately describe the organisation within its sector.

Please ensure all new customer requests are checked against the URN list before submitting a request form; our guidance should also be referred to.

If your customer is not included in the list, you will need to request a new URN by completing and submitting the add organisation request form (MS Excel Spreadsheet, 37KB) to supplier@ccs.gsi.gov.uk.

All worksheets within the customer URN list should be checked before submitting a request as some customer records may have been renamed or merged.

Read the URN request guidance (PDF, 126KB, 1 page) before completing the request form.

Promoting your place on a CCS agreement

Suppliers are encouraged to promote the fact that their goods and services are available through a CCS agreement to prospective public sector customers. To request a copy of the supplier marketing toolkit which includes logos and guidance please contact your CCS agreement manager or email supplier@ccs.gsi.gov.uk

Supplier management

CCS manages suppliers on framework agreements. A network of Crown Representatives also helps ensure the government is getting the best value for taxpayers from its contracts with strategically important suppliers.

Audit and assurance

An annual supplier audit programme is carried out to provide assurance to the CCS board and the National Audit Office (NAO). The strategy is agreed in conjunction with the NAO and a risk based methodology is applied to identify suppliers to include in the annual audit plan.

This programme reviews:

  • the accuracy, appropriateness and completeness of management information returns
  • the timely and accurate payment of invoices
  • the appropriate and accurate charging of customers making purchases under framework agreements

As a CCS supplier, your organisation is also required to provide an annual self-audit certificate confirming that you have robust systems in place to identify, record and report accurate and complete framework spend.

Expiring agreements

When the CCS agreement you are on is expiring or being replaced you will need to retender for a place on the new agreement. Contracts are not renewed automatically.

You can view forthcoming tender opportunities on the CCS procurement pipeline

Improving public procurement practice

CCS operates a Mystery Shopper scheme providing a direct route for suppliers to raise concerns about poor public procurement practice.

Bribery Act 2010

CCS expects its suppliers to put appropriate controls and procedures in place to ensure compliance with the Bribery Act 2010

Government Security Classifications Scheme

A new Government Security Classifications scheme was introduced in April 2014 making it simpler to classify government documents.

If you have any general enquiries please contact the Cabinet Office policy team at classifications@cabinet-office.x.gsi.gov.uk

May 05, 2015 12:03 PM

May 03, 2015

Planet KDE

collaborative editing for the win

On the first day of the Kolab Summit we announced that Kolab is getting full extended MAPI support. That was in itself a pretty fantastic announcement, but it was accompanied by announcements of instant messaging, WebRTC and collaborative editing.

Here is a picture which I think captures what the LibreOffice and WebODF people think about this direction, captured over lunch today:

by Aaron Seigo (aseigo) at May 03, 2015 12:17 PM

April 23, 2015

UK Government

April 22, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Jahia to Offer Ethical Web Data Exchange to Apache - CMSWire


Jahia to Offer Ethical Web Data Exchange to Apache
CMSWire
It launched a formalization process with the OASIS standards organization — the same one which stewards the OpenDocument (ODF) format used by the free office applications suite LibreOffice. The initial meetings of the CXS technical committee (TC) have ...

and more »

April 22, 2015 06:54 PM

UK Government

Corporate information: Working for British High Commission Colombo

Updated: Adding another job vacancy

We thank you for your interest in British High Commission as a potential employer. The British High Commission is an equal opportunity employer. We encourage applications from applicants with diverse backgrounds and do not discriminate on the basis of gender, ethnicity, age, religion or disability.

Vacancy Advertisement: Deputy Programme Manager

The main purpose of this job is to jointly develop and effectively manage Conflict Security and Stability Fund (CSSF) projects (£2m for FY 15-16), ensuring effective delivery, monitoring and evaluation, financial administration, and reporting. And also work closely with the wider political team to ensure projects deliver real impact in support of UK objectives. Applications closing date is 30th April 2015 midnight. For mode details, read the complete Job Specification for the Post of Deputy Programme Manager B3 (ODT, 111KB) .

Please use our Job Application From (ODT, 37.7KB) when you apply to the above job vacancy.

Vacancy Advertisement:Enrichment Team Leader

The main purpose of this job is to lead the Colombo end of UKVI’s enrichment operation and thereby ensure that proper checks are done on applications, applicants and documentation, to ensure that control of the UK border is maintained. Applications closing date is 6th May 2015 midnight. For mode details, read the complete Enrichment Team Leader (ODT, 113KB) .

Please use our Job Application Form (ODT, 37.7KB) when you apply to the above job vacancy.

April 22, 2015 11:51 AM

ODF Wikipedia Page

AliIsingor: /* Worldwide adoption */ add turkey

Worldwide adoption: add turkey

← Previous revision Revision as of 04:34, 22 April 2015
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* [[Serbia]]
 
* [[Serbia]]
 
* [[Switzerland]]
 
* [[Switzerland]]
  +
* [[Turkey]]
 
{{endflatlist}}
 
{{endflatlist}}
 
|-
 
|-

by AliIsingor at April 22, 2015 04:34 AM

April 20, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

Kitsunegami: /* Additional royalty-free licensing */ Fixed spaced em dashes.

Additional royalty-free licensing: Fixed spaced em dashes.

← Previous revision Revision as of 02:17, 20 April 2015
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Key contributor [[Sun Microsystems]] made an irrevocable intellectual property covenant, providing all implementers with the guarantee that Sun will not seek to enforce any of its enforceable U.S. or foreign patents against any implementation of the OpenDocument specification in which development Sun participates to the point of incurring an obligation.<ref name="SunOpenDocumentPatentStatement">{{cite web | url = http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/office/ipr.php | title = Sun OpenDocument Patent Statement | work = OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) TC | author = Microsystems, Inc. | publisher = OASIS foundation}}</ref>
 
Key contributor [[Sun Microsystems]] made an irrevocable intellectual property covenant, providing all implementers with the guarantee that Sun will not seek to enforce any of its enforceable U.S. or foreign patents against any implementation of the OpenDocument specification in which development Sun participates to the point of incurring an obligation.<ref name="SunOpenDocumentPatentStatement">{{cite web | url = http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/office/ipr.php | title = Sun OpenDocument Patent Statement | work = OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) TC | author = Microsystems, Inc. | publisher = OASIS foundation}}</ref>
   
A second contributor to ODF development, [[IBM]] which, for instance, has contributed Lotus spreadsheet documentation<ref>{{cite web|url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200607/msg00076.html|title=Formula subcommittee status|author=David A. Wheeler|publisher=office@lists.oasis-open.org, office-formula@lists.oasis-open.org|date=21 Jul 2006<!-- 13:50:46 -0400 (EDT)-->|accessdate=12 September 2012}}</ref> has made their patent rights available through their'' Interoperability Specifications Pledge'' in which "IBM irrevocably covenants to you that it will not assert any Necessary Claims against you for your making, using, importing, selling, or offering for sale Covered Implementations."<ref name="IBM-ISP-list">{{cite web|url=http://www-03.ibm.com/linux/ossstds/isplist.html|title=Interoperability Pledge Specification List|work=Interoperability Specifications Pledge|publisher=IBM Corp|date=12 December 2011|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
+
A second contributor to ODF development, [[IBM]]&nbsp;– which, for instance, has contributed Lotus spreadsheet documentation<ref>{{cite web|url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200607/msg00076.html|title=Formula subcommittee status|author=David A. Wheeler|publisher=office@lists.oasis-open.org, office-formula@lists.oasis-open.org|date=21 Jul 2006<!-- 13:50:46 -0400 (EDT)-->|accessdate=12 September 2012}}</ref>&nbsp;– has made their patent rights available through their'' Interoperability Specifications Pledge'' in which "IBM irrevocably covenants to you that it will not assert any Necessary Claims against you for your making, using, importing, selling, or offering for sale Covered Implementations."<ref name="IBM-ISP-list">{{cite web|url=http://www-03.ibm.com/linux/ossstds/isplist.html|title=Interoperability Pledge Specification List|work=Interoperability Specifications Pledge|publisher=IBM Corp|date=12 December 2011|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
   
 
The [[Software Freedom Law Center]] has [http://www.softwarefreedom.org/resources/2006/OpenDocument.html examined] whether there are any legal barriers to the use of the OpenDocument Format (ODF) in free and open source software arising from the standardization process. In their opinion ODF is free of legal encumbrances that would prevent its use in free and open source software, as distributed under licenses authored by Apache and the FSF.
 
The [[Software Freedom Law Center]] has [http://www.softwarefreedom.org/resources/2006/OpenDocument.html examined] whether there are any legal barriers to the use of the OpenDocument Format (ODF) in free and open source software arising from the standardization process. In their opinion ODF is free of legal encumbrances that would prevent its use in free and open source software, as distributed under licenses authored by Apache and the FSF.

by Kitsunegami at April 20, 2015 02:17 AM

April 17, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: Key stage 2 tests: headteachers’ responsibilities

Updated: Date when mark schemes will be published on NCA tools has been corrected to Tuesday 26 May.

Headteachers at schools which are taking part in the key stage 2 tests have specific responsibilities. These are described in the Introduction to the key stage 2 ‘Assessment and reporting arrangements’. This guidance explains how to fulfil your responsibilities in relation to the tests.

Maladministration

Your school could be subject to investigations of maladministration if it doesn’t comply with our test administration guidance. This consists of:

You should consider taking steps to protect staff involved in administering the tests against allegations of maladministration. For example, you could invite a trusted member of your school’s community to observe the tests being administered at your school. Allegations of maladministration can come from misunderstandings about correct test administration and use of access arrangements. To avoid this, make sure all staff, pupils and parents understand:

  • how the tests will be administered
  • what the test timetable is
  • what assistance is allowed in the tests
  • how any access arrangements will be used

Test administrators

Everyone involved in administering the tests must be thoroughly trained and familiar with the Standards and Testing Agency’s guidance. We suggest you hold training sessions for your test administration team. If you have arranged independent observation of the tests at your school, observers should also attend this training.

Test administrators should be familiar with:

Make sure each test administrator also understands:

You will need to think about how many staff will be needed to administer the tests. Anyone administering a test on their own is more vulnerable to allegations of maladministration as they don’t have another adult to verify the test administration procedures. We recommend having at least 2 test administrators in each test room. If this will be difficult for your school, you should consider using a timetable variation.

If a test administrator is a relative of a pupil they are supervising, there must be at least 1 other test administrator (not related to the pupil) present at all times.

Arrangements should also be in place in case a pupil needs to be removed, eg if they are disruptive or become ill.

Registering pupils for the tests

You must have registered and confirmed all pupils that are at the end of key stage 2 via the NCA tools website by Friday 20 March.

Any pupils not registered for the level 6 tests by Friday 20 March will not be able to participate in them.

The pupil registration section of NCA tools remains open after Friday 20 March for the levels 3-5 tests. You should amend the data in this section to reflect any pupils that leave or join your school. You should do this up until the last day of test week.

Arrangements for pupils with specific needs

Access arrangements

You must make sure test administrators know which pupils will be allowed access arrangements, and understand how to use these correctly. We advise each test administrator is given a list of any pupils with access arrangements in advance of the tests.

Relatives, carers or guardians of pupils who need access arrangements must not be involved in administering the tests to those pupils. If you use access arrangements, you should consider whether to administer the tests to pupils in a separate room to the main group. Your school may receive a monitoring visit. If so, you will need to show evidence that:

  • any access arrangements are based on normal classroom practice
  • each pupil using access arrangements, eg a prompter, has an associated special educational need

You should also consider explaining to all parents and pupils what support can be given in the test. This should help to avoid any misinterpretation of valid access arrangements, which could lead to allegations of maladministration.

Headteachers need to complete application or notification forms for certain access arrangements. Make sure you read the guidance so you understand your responsibilities.

Special consideration

Occasionally a pupil’s performance may be affected by extremely distressing circumstances at the time of the tests. We may adjust the pupil’s test result to accommodate this. You will need to read the guidance on eligibility before you apply.

Test materials

Security

You must make sure your test materials are kept securely from when they are delivered to your school until the end of the test period. You will receive your school’s materials during the week commencing 27 April. The test period ends on Thursday 21 May, (the last date a pupil may take a test using a timetable variation).

Store test materials in a secure locked cupboard. The tests should not be opened before they are administered unless the test paper needs to be modified or a translation needs to be made. In this instance they may be opened up to an hour before the administration of the tests. If more than an hour is required for any modification or translation then an application for early opening should have been made.

Read our guidance about:

Deliveries of test materials

You will receive your test materials during the week commencing 27 April. Your stationery pack will be in a separate consignment to the test paper packs.

If you have ordered modified versions of the tests, these will be delivered in the same consignment as standard test materials. If you have ordered braille tests you will receive additional stationery items for dispatching braille test scripts.

Quantities of materials are based on the information your school submitted during the pupil registration process.

You will not be sent printed mark schemes. These are published on the ‘Test orders’ section of the NCA tools website on Tuesday 26 May and the past papers section of GOV.UK on Tuesday 23 June.

If you have not received all of your test materials by Tuesday 5 May, or if your delivery is incorrect, contact the national curriculum assessments helpline as soon as possible.

Checking deliveries

You should check your delivery as soon as it is received. At this point you should start a log to record who has access to the test materials.

Test packs

The packs of test papers must not be opened.

Two members of staff should carry out the following checks together.

As soon as your materials arrive:

  • check that the school details are correct and that the delivery is for your school
  • check the boxes for any damage

Any boxes of test papers that are unsealed or damaged on arrival must be reported immediately to the national curriculum assessments helpline. You may be asked to send a photograph of the damage to us.

There will be a delivery note in the first box of each consignment. Use it to make sure you have received the correct number of boxes and that each box tallies correctly. Annotate the delivery note accordingly. Keep your copy of the delivery note in an accessible place. You will be asked to produce it if you have a monitoring visit.

You may wish to organise the test packs in the order the tests will be taken. If you do, make sure you record this on your test materials log.

When you have finished your checks, make sure you reseal the boxes and secure them in a locked cupboard. There is guidance on GOV.UK about security of test materials.

Stationery packs

You will receive 1 stationery consignment during the week commencing 27 April. If you have registered pupils for the level 6 tests by Friday 20 March, this will include stationery for these tests as well as the levels 3-5 tests. The contents of the stationery packs are listed on the pack cover sheet. You may open the stationery packs to confirm that the correct materials are enclosed.

Your test attendance registers will be included in the stationery pack. The ‘Attendance register and test script dispatch instructions’ give details of how to check that your attendance registers are correct.

Preparing test materials

You can only open test paper packs before the scheduled test date if we have given you permission. The deadline for applications was Monday 2 March.

Test packs can be opened up to 1 hour before the start of a particular test but only if:

  • a written translation is needed for a mathematics test
  • a test paper needs to be adapted to meet an individual pupil’s needs

At least 2 members of staff should be present while test materials are opened and prepared.

Equipment

It is important to make sure that all equipment is ready and working before the tests. This section lists everything you will need for the standard versions of the tests. The specific instructions for each levels 3-5 and level 6 test lists equipment by test.

Pupils will need:

  • blue / black pens or dark pencils, pencil sharpeners and rubbers
  • rulers (showing centimetres and millimetres)
  • angle measurers or protractors
  • tracing paper
  • mirrors
  • calculators that are normally used in class for the level 6 mathematics Paper 2 only

Pupils may use highlighter pens to highlight sections of the reading booklet for their own reference, if this is normal classroom practice. Highlighted text must not form part of their response.

All the key stage 2 tests will be marked on screen in 2015. Pupils must not use glitter pens or coloured pens, in particular red. These are illegible when scanned for on screen marking.

For the levels 3-5 mental mathematics test you will need the following in each room where the test is being administered:

  • a CD player
  • a stopwatch, watch or clock with a second hand (in case of a fault with the CD or CD player and/or where the test is being administered using the test transcript)

Dictionaries and other reference material

Dictionaries, bilingual word lists and electronic spell checkers can only be used as shown in the specific instructions for each of the levels 3-5 and level 6 tests, providing this is normal classroom practice.

Pupils must not use a thesaurus during any of the tests.

Additional paper

The test papers and answer booklets have been designed so that most pupils will have enough room to record their answers. If necessary pupils may be given spare lined paper for the English reading tests and the level 6 English grammar, punctuation and spelling test Paper 1: extended task. Spare paper must not be provided in any other test.

Pupils taking the level 6 English grammar, punctuation and spelling test Paper 1: extended task should ensure they have used the extra page in the back of the booklet before they use any additional paper. They should write their name, school name and Department for Education number on any additional paper they use. The instructions on packing test scripts include information about how to return any scripts where additional paper has been used.

Test rooms

Think about how many rooms you will need to administer the tests, eg if you are using access arrangements you may need to separate specific pupils from the main group. Any rooms where tests will take place should be prepared before pupils are admitted. This means:

  • removing or covering any displays or materials that could help pupils
  • ensuring seating arrangements will allow all pupils to work quietly and independently
  • making sure pupils won’t be able to view other pupils’ test papers
  • ensuring a clock is visible in the room to help pupils pace themselves
  • ensuring there is a board at the front of the room for test administrators to write start and finish times and other information

Administering the tests away from school

In exceptional circumstances you may administer tests at a different location within the UK, eg another school, the pupil’s home, a hospital or pupil referral unit. You must still make sure the test administration guidance is followed correctly.

Packing test scripts for marking

You are responsible for making sure your school’s test scripts are collated, packed and sealed correctly, as soon as possible on the day of each test. We advise you are personally involved in packing your school’s scripts. The ‘Attendance register and test script dispatch instructions’ explains exactly how to do this.

Any individual left alone with test materials is vulnerable to allegations of maladministration. Make sure that test scripts:

  • are collected and collated by more than 1 person
  • aren’t left with an individual at any point

Your test administrators should return test scripts to you immediately after each test. Emphasise they must not review pupils’ answers, unless they are making a transcript. Test administrators should know which pupils are likely to need a transcript before the administration of the tests.

You are responsible for ensuring that pupils’ answers are their own and that they are not amended after the tests.

Headteacher’s declaration form

You must complete and submit the headteacher’s declaration form after your school has completed the tests. The form either confirms that you have administered the tests according to the published guidance or that you have raised issues with us.

The form must only be completed after all test scripts, including any level 6 test scripts, have been collected for marking.

Completing the form

You, or a delegated senior member of staff, must complete and submit the online form on the ‘Pupil registration’ section of the NCA tools website. The form is available from 5pm on Thursday 14 May until Friday 22 May.

The form includes instructions to help you complete it correctly. You will need to know the total number of pupils who sat the levels 3-5 and level 6 tests, including those who took braille versions. You can get this information from your test attendance registers.

This year the form includes an additional question which asks whether you invited observers to oversee some or all of the tests.

Where possible you need to confirm that the tests have been administered in accordance with the statutory requirements as set out in the 2015 key stage 2 ‘Assessments and reporting arrangements’ and the confidentiality of the tests has been maintained. If any of the statements in the form can’t be confirmed then you need to confirm that this has been reported to us.

You can’t amend the form after it has been submitted.

If for any reason you can’t complete the headteacher’s declaration form, you should notify the national curriculum assessments helpline.

Getting help

Standards and Testing Agency

For general enquiries about national curriculum tests.

April 17, 2015 03:00 PM

Detailed guide: Key stage 2 tests: how to use access arrangements

Updated: The 'Early opening' section has been updated to clarify the situation around opening test papers early to make photocopies.

A small number of pupils may need additional arrangements so they can take part in the key stage 2 tests. Headteachers and teachers must consider access arrangements before they administer the tests.

Access arrangements should be based primarily on normal classroom practice for pupils with particular needs. They must never provide an unfair advantage; the support given must not change the test questions and the answers must be the pupil’s own.

If schools use access arrangements for a pupil inappropriately, the pupil’s results may be anulled.

Because of the diversity of pupils’ needs this page doesn’t list every circumstance where it would be appropriate to use access arrangements. When you are planning for the tests you should think of any needs your pupils may have and whether they receive additional support as part of normal classroom practice. If the guidance below doesn’t cover your pupils’ needs, contact us by using the Message us page in the ‘Access arrangements’ section of the NCA tools website.

Which pupils may use access arrangements

Read the national curriculum tests section of the key stage 2 ‘Assessment and reporting arrangements’ for a summary of who access arrangements are for and how they can be used.

Some pupils may not be able to access the tests, despite the provision of the additional arrangements described below. If you have queries about using access arrangements with individual pupils, you should contact us by using the Message us page in the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools.

Additional time

Additional time may be appropriate for pupils who:

  • use additional time as part of normal classroom practice
  • are working at the level of the key stage 2 tests
  • use the standard versions of the tests

Schools must complete an application to administer additional time to these pupils. The deadline for applications is Monday 27 April.

Pupils who automatically qualify for additional time

A pupil is automatically entitled to additional time if they:

  • have a statement of special educational needs or an Education Health and Care Plan (EHCP)
  • use the braille or modified large print (MLP) versions of the tests

You do not need to complete an application for these pupils.

Pupils with a statement of special educational needs or EHCP are allowed up to 25% additional time, except for the mental mathematics test and the spelling task.

Pupils who use the braille or MLP versions of the tests can have up to 100% additional time.

Pupils who should not be given additional time

Some pupils should not be given additional time as they should not be taking the tests. These pupils will be:

  • working below the level of the tests
  • working at the level of the tests but unable to participate even using access arrangements

Making applications

You must complete the additional time form on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools. The form will be available from Monday 2 February. It must be completed by Monday 27 April. Unless you are from an independent school, you will need to provide pupils’ UPNs when completing applications.

Applications should be made by a teacher who has a good knowledge of the particular pupil’s needs and abilities. Reports from educational psychologists or other education professionals are not required and won’t be considered.

Applications can’t be amended. You should read the Additional time application questions (ODT, 50KB) before you start. This will ensure you understand what information is needed to complete the application process.

You will need to respond to a short series of questions about the pupil. The questions draw on your knowledge of pupils and your ability to assess an individual pupil and their corresponding access needs. Some questions in the form have been revised to help schools accurately identify pupils who may need access arrangements.

You will be given information about the use of additional time and any alternative access arrangements for a particular pupil as soon as you have completed the application process. Local authorities (LAs) will not consider applications for additional time although they will be able to view completed applications.

You must have evidence to justify your decisions regarding the use of additional time in case you receive a monitoring visit.

Schools that use additional time or any other access arrangement inappropriately will be subject to a maladministration investigation. This could lead to pupils’ results being amended or annulled.

Specific uses of additional time

Please refer to the following sections for guidance on using additional time in specific circumstances:

Apparatus in the mathematics test

If a pupil has difficulties accessing two-dimensional diagrams you may give them real objects that look like those illustrated in the mathematics tests.

Number apparatus, counters or number squares must not be used.

You don’t need to get permission from us or your LA before providing apparatus for a pupil taking a key stage 2 test.

Test administrators may indicate on the test papers where real objects are available for pupils to look at. Shapes should be identical to those drawn and relative sizes should be the same.

Squared paper should not be given to pupils as a standard resource in the mathematics tests. Squared paper may support some pupils when they are laying out calculation questions, however it can disadvantage them on other questions. For example, where pupils are asked to find the area of a shape, drawing the shape on squared paper and counting the squares may be less effective than using a calculation method.

If it is normal classroom practice for a pupil to use squared paper you may provide it. However you should be careful that they only use it for formatting their calculations or generating number squares. Any squared paper used should be included with the pupil’s test script when scripts are returned to the headteacher or senior member of staff responsible for collating the test scripts.

Pupils with a visual impairment

You can make these access arrangements at your own discretion. You don’t need to request permission.

Modified versions of the tests

MLP, braille and enlarged print (EP) tests are available for pupils with a visual impairment. The Key stage 2 tests: materials for pupils with a visual or hearing impairment page gives information about the modified versions of the tests and how to order them.

Adapting test papers

Test papers can be opened up to 1 hour before a test is due to start to make the following adaptations, provided this is normal classroom practice.

Enlarging or reducing modified test papers

You may further enlarge the modified test papers, with the exception of certain mathematics questions detailed below. In exceptional cases it may be appropriate to enlarge or reduce sections of the text in the MLP or EP versions of the tests. You should contact our modified test helpline for guidance.

Enhancing diagrams

You may enhance the shading on diagrams (including braille diagrams), charts and graphs to increase their visual clarity. Bold lines may also be added for pupils with spatial perception difficulties. You must take care not to invalidate the tests by drawing the pupil’s attention to the response sought.

Diagrams may also be enlarged, cut out, embossed or mounted on card or other materials. You must avoid changing the nature of any question, particularly in mathematics.

Certain diagrams in the mathematics papers must not be enlarged. These will be listed in the guidance that accompanies the standard and modified tests.

Diagrams must not be altered in any other way.

Photocopying onto coloured paper or using coloured overlays

You may photocopy the test papers onto coloured paper. You don’t need to apply for early opening to do this as you can photocopy papers in the hour before the tests.

Pupils may also use coloured overlays and coloured filter lenses.

Using emphasis in MLP and braille test papers

Bold, underlining, upper case text and italics are sometimes removed from the MLP and braille test papers to increase accessibility. You may underline or highlight words presented in these styles in the standard versions of the tests provided it does not give the pupil an unfair advantage. Readers may add emphasis in the mathematics and English grammar, punctuation and spelling tests, and in the English reading general instructions.

Adapting braille test papers

For the 2015 key stage 2 tests, schools will be sent braille versions of the tests in both Standard English Braille (SEB) and United English Braille (UEB). You should select the version of braille that best suits the needs of your pupil(s). You may also adapt braille test papers into grade 1 braille or non-capitalised braille. If you need to adapt braille test papers you should consider whether you need to make an application for early opening in order to make the changes.

Making recorded versions of the mathematics tests

You may produce recorded versions of the written mathematics tests for pupils who regularly use recordings or have access to readers. Recorded versions can be used alongside the standard and modified versions of the tests.

The general instructions for the tests may be clarified in recorded versions, but no other changes can be made to the wording of the tests.

Recorded versions of the English tests are not allowed.

Low-vision aids

Pupils who normally use technical or electrical aids, including low-vision aids such as closed-circuit TV or JOCR scanners, may use these for the tests.

The process for letting us know if a pupil has used an electronic or technical aid has changed. The headteacher must complete an online notification form via the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools.

Supporting pupils using braille test papers

Readers and test administrators may help pupils use tactile diagrams, graphs and tables to obtain information that the standard paper would give to a sighted pupil.

Compensatory marks

Eligibility

Compensatory marks may be awarded to pupils who have a profound hearing impairment and do not use lip-reading or a signing system.

They are available for the:

  • spelling component of the levels 3-5, and level 6, English grammar, punctuation and spelling test
  • levels 3-5 mental mathematics test

Compensatory marks are based on average scores generated during the pre-testing phase of a test’s development. Awarding these marks may mean that pupils can receive a test level. This is dependent on completion of the other components of the relevant test and the total overall marks.

If a pupil takes a test, which has been approved for compensatory marks, the pupil will be awarded marks based on their performance in the test. They will not be awarded the compensatory marks.

Apply

The ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools opens on Monday 2 February for applications for compensatory marks. The deadline for schools to submit applications is Monday 2 March.

Early opening

You may open test papers, including modified test papers, up to 1 hour before a test is due to start without seeking our permission. This flexibility is designed to help schools that need to make small adaptations for their pupils, eg photocopying test papers onto coloured paper.

If you need to open test papers, including modified test papers, more than 1 hour before a test is due to start you must submit an application. We will only allow schools to open test materials more than 1 day before the tests in exceptional circumstances. The ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools opens on Monday 2 February for applications for early opening. The deadline for schools to submit applications is Monday 2 March. All schools that have applied for early opening will have been notified of the outcome of their application via NCA tools by Monday 13 April.

Permission is required in all cases, regardless of a pupil’s provision as determined in the Special educational needs (SEN) code of practice. This applies to the early opening of modified and standard test materials.

The headteacher is responsible for safeguarding the security and confidentiality of test materials before the administration of the tests and until they are dispatched for marking.

Eligibility

You will only be given permission to open test materials early if you need to prepare apparatus or make adaptations to text. Early opening may be appropriate when:

  • preparations need to be made to use MLP or braille versions of the tests such as setting up visual scanning equipment or preparing tactile examples
  • some or all of a test paper needs to be enlarged to a particular font size for a pupil with a visual impairment or specific special educational needs
  • communicators or sign language interpreters need to co-ordinate the presentation of a test to a large number of pupils with a hearing impairment and / or pupils who use sign language
  • a pupil uses apparatus or adaptations to text as part of normal classroom practice that can’t be prepared in the hour before the start of the test

These pupils will usually be those:

  • with a statement of SEN or an EHCP as described in SEN Code of Practice or a local equivalent such as an Individual Pupil Resourcing Agreement (IPRA)
  • for whom provision is being made in school using the SEN Support system or the School Action or School Action Plus aspect of the SEN code of practice and whose learning difficulty or disability significantly affects their ability to access the tests

You must receive confirmation from us before opening test materials early. Only the headteacher or a person making adaptations to text should have access to test papers that have been opened early.

Circumstances when early opening is not appropriate

Early opening to prepare apparatus or make adaptations to text is not appropriate when:

  • a pupil is working below the level of the test and would not benefit from taking part in the test even with access arrangements
  • a pupil doesn’t use apparatus or have adaptations made to text as part of normal classroom practice
  • a pupil’s needs would be better catered for by other access arrangements such as rest breaks and / or working in a separate room

An early opening application will not be approved if it is received after the deadline of Monday 2 March.

Modified test materials

You should request permission for early opening of modified test materials in the usual way.

You may open and assemble any models supplied for the MLP and braille tests up to 2 school days before the test. The date when model packs can be opened is stated on the cover of the test pack.

Modified versions of the tests come with modified subject-specific guidance for administering the tests. This guidance may be opened 1 school day before the test. The date is stated on the cover of the test pack.

The contents of the assembly notes and guidance are strictly confidential and must not be passed on or circulated in any way.

Injury or illness

Injuries

You must not open the tests early because of injuries.

A week before the tests

Schools can use access arrangements when a pupil’s injury affects their ability to take the tests, for example if they break their writing arm or hand. Appropriate access arrangements are:

  • 25% additional time and / or a scribe
  • a word processor
  • a transcript

You do not need to request permission to use access arrangements in these circumstances, but you do need to complete the new notification form on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools. This is available from Friday 8 May.

At the end of each test, test administrators should make a note of which pupils used a scribe, transcript, or word processor or electronic or technical aid and give the information to their headteacher. The headteacher must use this information to complete an online notification form via the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools. The form should be completed once all tests have been completed. It must be submitted before the headteacher’s declaration form.

More than a week before the tests

A pupil should be given the chance to practice with a scribe under test conditions. They therefore won’t be eligible for additional time.

Pupils with injuries who still took the test do not qualify for special consideration as alternative access arrangements are available.

Illness

Pupils who are ill on the day of a test are not expected to sit them. You should consider using a timetable variation if it is a minor illness and a pupil is not able to take the test later that day.

Timetable variations may allow a pupil to take a test up 5 school days after the published test date.

If a pupil doesn’t take a test because of illness, the pupil should be entered as absent on the attendance register.

Pupils who were ill but still took the test do not qualify for special consideration as they shouldn’t have taken the test if they were unwell.

Mental mathematics test

These arrangements can be used to enable pupils to access the mental mathematics test.

Rest breaks

If a pupil has a medical issue during the mental mathematics test they may have a rest break. When the pupil is ready to continue, the test should be restarted at the beginning of the question.

Pupils with a visual impairment

Pupils who use MLP papers for the written mathematics test will be provided with a modified version of the mental mathematics answer sheet. A modified script will be provided for test administrators.

Pupils who use braille will be provided with grade 2 braille versions of the stimulus material from the answer sheet. A modified script will be provided for test administrators.

The standard mental mathematics CD and script must not be used with the MLP and braille versions of the test. This is because of changes to timings and the modification of some questions. In these cases, the mental mathematics test must be administered in a separate room on a one-to-one or small-group basis.

Modified subject-specific guidance on how to administer the mental mathematics test for pupils using MLP or braille versions of the tests will accompany the modified tests.

Pupils who use EP tests must use the standard recorded version of the mental mathematics test. They must not be given additional time to answer test questions.

Additional time for pupils using MLP or braille versions of the test

Pupils using the MLP or braille versions of the mental mathematics test may be given as much additional time as they need to familiarise themselves with any stimulus material before a test question is read.

Once a question has been asked, you may allow pupils up to 100% additional time to process the language of the question and record their answer. The additional time is reflected in the modified script. Timings in the script must be strictly adhered to.

Pupils with a hearing impairment

Pupils should use the answer sheet provided with no additional time and no additional stimulus materials.

You should use either the CD or test administrator read version of the standard mental mathematics test on a one-to-one or small-group basis. Consider administering the test:

  • individually at full volume
  • through earphones
  • by reading it aloud to the pupil

Reading the test transcript

If you choose to read the test to a pupil you must complete the mental mathematics notification form on the ‘Access arrangements section of NCA tools.

This opens on Monday 2 February for you to complete the notification form. The deadline for schools to submit the form is Friday 22 May.

Rolling subtitles

If your school does not use British Sign Language (BSL) you may produce rolling subtitles displayed via a computer, if this is normal classroom practice.

This access arrangement may also be appropriate for other pupils that have difficulty processing information received aurally. If you have queries about using this access arrangement for pupils who do not have a hearing impairment you should contact us by using the Message us page in the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools.

You should apply for early opening via NCA tools to make these modifications. The ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools opens on Monday 2 February for applications for early opening. The deadline for schools to submit applications is Monday 2 March. All schools that have applied for early opening will have been notified of the outcome of their application via NCA tools by Monday 13 April.

Modified materials

These are available for pupils:

  • with permanent or long-term hearing loss who rely on BSL or other sign-supported communication
  • who supplement their residual hearing with lip-reading

They consist of:

  • a modified script for the test administrator (an oralist and sign-supported English modified script for lip-readers, or a BSL script)
  • a CD or flashcards of the stimulus material from the answer sheet plus some additional stimulus material where this will support access to the test content

The standard mental mathematics CD and script must not be used with the additional support materials. This is because of changes to timings and the wording of some questions. A communicator or signer should administer the tests in a separate room on a one-to-one or small-group basis using the modified script provided. Each pupil must be provided with a standard answer sheet.

Read Key stage 2 tests: materials for pupils with a visual or hearing impairment for details of these materials and how to order them.

Arrangements for pupils who do not use sign language or lip-read

You may produce rolling subtitles for pupils with a profound hearing impairment who are unable to use a sign system or lip-read, if this is normal classroom practice. Subtitles should be displayed on a computer. Each question must be repeated twice on screen and then pupils should be given the correct time allocation to answer.

This access arrangement may also be appropriate for other pupils that have difficulty processing information received aurally. If you have queries about using this access arrangement for pupils who do not have a hearing impairment you should contact us by using the Message us page in the ‘Access arrangements’ section of the NCA tools website website.

Pupils with dual sensory impairment

These pupils might be able to access the mental mathematics test if provided with an enlarged answer sheet. This can be used with the stimulus material for pupils with a hearing impairment.

Pupils with a motor disability

You may use the teacher transcript enclosed with the test papers to read the test to the pupil if they can’t write the answer within the time limit. If you choose to read the test to a pupil you must complete the mental mathematics notification form on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools.

This opens on Monday 2 February for you to complete the notification form. The deadline for schools to submit the form is Friday 22 May.

In these cases, you must administer the test to the pupil individually. You must make sure they do not have any more than the 5, 10 or 15 seconds’ ‘thinking time’ allowed for each question. However, they may have additional time to record or communicate their answers, depending on the nature and degree of their needs.

Pupils with limited fluency in English

You may choose to deliver an oral translation of the mental mathematics test to a pupil with limited fluency in English as long as:

  • the translated version of the test is delivered orally
  • all timings are strictly observed
  • the translation is not made or delivered by a relative of the pupil

Oral translations can usually be made in the hour before the test. However, early opening may be allowed if you will have difficulties making translations in time.

The ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools opens on Monday 2 February for applications for early opening. The deadline for schools to submit applications is Monday 2 March. All schools that have applied for early opening will have been notified of the outcome of their application via NCA tools by Monday 13 April.

Pupils with specific difficulties processing spoken language

The mental mathematics test is a test of a pupil’s ability to mentally process mathematics questions under timed conditions. Additional time is not allowed for the mental mathematics test for pupils who only have processing difficulties, eg autism.

You could administer the test by reading and following the mental mathematics test transcript to the pupil rather than using the recording supplied on CD. This method must be used on a one-to-one basis. Although the timings remain the same this approach may help the pupil to access the test.

If a pupil has specific difficulties with processing spoken language you may choose to support administration of the mental mathematics test using flashcards. These are available to order from our modified test helpline. You could also make your own rolling subtitles which would allow the pupil to read each question instead of having the test delivered orally.

If you have queries about using this access arrangement you should contact us by using the Message us page in the ‘Access arrangements’ section of the NCA tools website website.

Prompters

A pupil with severe attention problems may be supported by a prompter. The use of a prompter must be normal classroom practice. Verbal prompting may be used where this is in line with the support the pupil normally receives in class.

You don’t need to request permission from us or your LA to use a prompter.

However, in the event of a monitoring visit you must:

  • have evidence to show that each pupil using a prompter has severe attention problems
  • be able to show that resources are routinely committed to providing this support

Prompters should:

  • agree the best way to prompt before the test begins
  • be the pupil’s own learning support assistant

Prompters must:

  • only be used on a one-to-one basis.
  • only be used to draw a pupil’s attention back to the task
  • not advise the pupil on which questions to do or when to move on to the next question
  • not help the pupil on the order in which to attempt questions
  • be careful that they do not do anything that could be interpreted as over-aiding pupils as this can lead to allegations of maladministration
  • not be a relative / carer or guardian of the pupil

If a pupil finds it difficult to concentrate on individual questions, then you may choose to use adhesive notes or stickers to cover other questions on the page. In these circumstances the whole question the pupil is currently working on should remain uncovered. This should only be done when it is in line with the support the pupil normally receives in class.

Readers

The use of a reader must be normal classroom practice. You must have evidence to show that resources are routinely committed to providing this support. A reader must only be used on a one-to-one basis. In most cases, this will apply to pupils whose reading age is considerably lower than their actual age.

You don’t need to request permission from us or your LA in these circumstances.

Readers are usually teachers or support assistants and they:

  • don’t need to be specialists in the subject being tested
  • should be able to read accurately and at a reasonable speed
  • must not be another pupil at the school or a relative / carer or guardian of the pupil

Before the test period, you need to make sure readers understand:

  • the test format and style
  • their role and what may or may not be read to a pupil in particular tests
  • any subject-specific issues that might occur

You should consider testing pupils in a separate room if they need more than single words or sentences read to them. For example a pupil’s individual education plan may show that they need the whole question paper read to them so that they can access the test.

If a pupil requests it, the reader may also read back any part of a pupil’s response.

Eligibility

Readers must not be used with pupils who are capable of reading the test materials on their own.

We will monitor schools during the test period to make sure readers are used correctly. The inappropriate use of readers may lead to the annulment of a pupil’s results.

English reading tests

The reader may only help the pupil to read the general instructions. This includes information on the front cover of the test paper and any directions that are not part of the actual questions. For example the reader may say ‘Questions 1–12 are about The Humble Potato (pages 4–5).’ The reader must not read the texts, questions or any part of a pupil’s response back to the pupil.

English grammar, punctuation and spelling tests

Readers are allowed for the English grammar, punctuation and spelling test if it is part of normal classroom practice. ‘Notes for readers in the English grammar, punctuation and spelling test: short answer questions’ gives examples of how particular types of questions should be read aloud to a pupil. Readers should make sure they understand the guidance so that they can read each question type correctly, in particular questions with multiple choice answers. This is so they don’t give pupils an advantage by reading questions in a particular way.

Mathematics tests

A reader may help a pupil to read the mathematics tests. They may:

  • clarify instructions as long as no additional information is given and the assessment is not invalidated
  • read but not clarify subject-specific vocabulary
  • refer a pupil back to the previous part of the question in multi-part questions

If you’re reading a mathematics question to a pupil you may read words and numbers but not mathematical symbols. This is so that the function of a mathematical symbol is not inadvertently explained by reading its name.

Rest breaks

You do not need to get permission from us or your LA before using rest breaks with a pupil taking the key stage 2 tests.

Guidance on using rest breaks

Rest breaks can be appropriate for a pupil who finds it difficult to concentrate or who may experience fatigue. Rest breaks can be provided by splitting the tests into sections or stopping the clock.

The content of the test must not be discussed during rest breaks.

English reading test

Levels 3-5 test

Rest breaks can be used at any point during the levels 3-5 English reading test. You might consider stopping the test once the pupil has either read a particular text or answered the questions for that text, before moving onto the next text in the test.

Level 6 test

Rest breaks can be used during the reading passage in the reading test. The pupil must read the entire reading passage before seeing or attempting the questions.

There isn’t specific guidance for the mathematics or the English grammar, punctuation and spelling tests. If you decide to split a test, be careful to:

  • divide the test into sections during the hour before it is due to start
  • administer all sections of the test on the timetabled day
  • make sure the pupil has the same overall time to complete the test as those who take the test in 1 sitting
  • keep the questions in the same order
  • give the pupil an opportunity to attempt all parts of a paper, so that the test properly reflects their attainment

If you stop the clock make sure you do not give unauthorised additional time.

Scribes

A scribe is a writing assistant who writes out answers dictated by the pupil.

You do not need to request permission from us or your LA when using a scribe but you do need to complete the new notification form on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools. This is available from Friday 8 May.

At the end of each test, test administrators should make a note of which pupils used a scribe and give the information to their headteacher. The headteacher must use this information to complete an online notification form via the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools. The form should be completed once all tests have been completed. It must be submitted before the headteacher’s declaration form.

Eligibility

You should consider using a word processor or transcription before deciding to use a scribe. A scribe should only be used if other options are not appropriate and if it is part of normal classroom practice for that pupil. You must have evidence to show that resources are routinely used to support the pupil (except in the case of injuries).

A scribe can be used when a pupil is physically:

  • unable to write their own answers or use a word processor
  • able to write but has a motor impairment that causes physical discomfort when writing
  • able to write but writes very slowly
  • able to write but finds writing very difficult
  • unable to write following an injury

You should arrange for a scribe in advance when you are aware of a pupil who may need a scribe part way through the test. A scribe might be needed for a pupil:

  • who is known to experience fatigue
  • with a visual / motor impairment and writes over their own handwriting which needs to be made clear

In these circumstances the pupil may start the test as normal and begin using a scribe when needed.

Guidance for scribes

Scribes:

  • must be able to write legibly
  • must be able to write at a reasonable speed
  • must not be another pupil at the school or a relative
  • must not be a guardian of the pupil taking the test
  • should have a working knowledge of the subject
  • may also act as a reader

The scribe must not pause for spellings to be dictated unless the pupil usually works this way. Pausing is allowed in the spelling component of the English grammar, punctuation and spelling test. All language, punctuation and phrasing must be the pupil’s own.

The scribe must:

  • not transcribe a braille script to print
  • make a correction on a typescript or braille script if asked to do so by the pupil
  • work at the pupil’s pace and not hurry them if they need time for reflection / rest or reading
  • follow precisely the pupil’s instructions to draw or add to diagrams / charts and graphs in the mathematics tests

Additional time

If a pupil needs a scribe because of an injury that occurred in the week before the tests you may use 25% additional time. This is only for circumstances where the pupil is unfamiliar with working with a scribe. Schools do not need to apply for additional time in this instance.

Transcripts

You do not need to request permission from us or your LA to create a transcript but you do need to complete the new notification form on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools. This is available from Friday 8 May.

At the end of each test, test administrators should make a note of which pupils used a transcript and give the information to their headteacher. The headteacher must use this information to complete an online notification form via the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools. The form should be completed once all tests have been completed. It must be submitted before the headteacher’s declaration form.

Guidance on creating a transcript

You can transcribe all or part of a pupil’s test script, if it will be very difficult for a marker to read the pupil’s writing. If the marker can read the pupil’s writing, they will mark the original work.

When transcribing a pupil’s work you must remember that:

  • a transcript can only be made at the end of the test
  • a different colour pen, but not red, must be used to transcribe onto the pupil’s script
  • extensive / full transcripts should be transcribed onto a new test paper
  • the test administrator should transcribe the work with the pupil present before the pupil leaves the test room
  • the pupil should be kept separate from the rest of the cohort until the transcript is complete
  • care must be taken to ensure that no original answers are changed
  • no assistance with spelling may be given in any of the tests
  • punctuation and phrasing must be the pupil’s own
  • the pupil’s original test script must be sent to the marker

Pupils who can’t read their own writing should use a word processor or scribe, if this is normal classroom practice.

Braille test scripts should not be transcribed as we will make appropriate marking arrangements.

Word processors or other technical or electrical aids

If a pupil uses a word processor or electronic or technical aid (including electronic readers and pens) you need to complete a new notification form. This is available on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools from Friday 8 May.

At the end of each test, test administrators should make a note of which pupils used a word processor or electronic or technical aid and give the information to their headteacher. Headteachers must use this information to complete the form on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools. The form should be filled out once all tests have been completed. It must be submitted before the headteacher’s declaration form.

Mathematics and English grammar, punctuation and spelling tests

Eligible pupils may use word processors or other technical or electrical aids during these tests provided:

  • it is normal classroom practice and you have evidence to show this
  • the equipment doesn’t read mathematical symbols in the mathematics tests or punctuation in the English grammar, punctuation and spelling tests
  • the equipment is used on a one-to-one basis, preferably in a separate room to the rest of the cohort

You should test the functionality of the equipment by using a past national curriculum test. If there is functionality which can’t be turned off which would provide the pupil with an advantage the pupil must not use the equipment. You may arrange for the test to be read to the pupil according to the guidance on using readers instead.

English reading test

Word processors or electronic or technical aids may be used to record pupils’ answers to the English reading test. They mustn’t be used to provide reading support, other than to read the general instructions on page 3 of the reading answer booklet.

You must ensure that the guidance relating to the use of readers is adhered to. Inappropriate use of equipment may lead to annulment of the pupil’s results.

Written or oral translations

The use of written or oral translations for pupils with English as an additional language (EAL) must be normal classroom practice. You must have evidence to show that resources are routinely committed to providing this support.

You don’t need to request permission from us or your LA to make translations.

The headteacher is responsible for assuring the quality of any translation made. Translations should be made at the time of the test.

Translators

Translators need to bear in mind that pupils with EAL may not be familiar with some subject vocabulary and technical terms in their preferred language. You should advise accordingly. A translator must not be a relative, carer or guardian of the pupil requiring a translation. Inappropriate use of translators may lead to annulment of the pupil’s results.

Timetable variations

You should consider a timetable variation when several pupils require a translator but only 1 is available. In exceptional circumstances, the school should apply for a timetable variation or early opening if a translator is not going to be available on the day.

English tests

You should bear in mind that:

  • oral and written translations of the questions can’t be given
  • no help may be given with reading or understanding the questions or passages of text on which questions are based
  • only the general instructions on the front cover of the question paper and any directions that are not part of the actual questions can be translated

Mathematics tests

Pupils may read the tests in English and answer:

  • in English
  • in their first language

Reading the tests in English and answering in their first language

If a pupil reads in English and answers in their own language, a transcript should be made by the pupil’s usual translator. The pupil’s original test script must be sent to the marker along with the translated test script. Your headteacher must also complete the new notification form to tell us that a transcript has been made. This is available on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools from Friday 8 May.

Oral translations

Oral translations may be given by a translator at the time of the tests. This must be on a one-to-one basis. If a pupil answers orally, this must also be on a one-to-one basis.

The pupil may then write their responses in English or in their first language. If the pupil’s answers are not in English a transcript should be made by the pupil’s usual translator.

The pupil’s original test script must be sent to the marker. Your headteacher must also complete the new notification form on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools. This is available from Friday 8 May.

Written translations

If written translations are normally provided in class, they should be made during the hour before the test is due to start. If, due to exceptional circumstances, it is not possible to do this, an application must be made to open materials 1 day early.

The pupil may respond in English or in their first language. If the pupil’s answers are not in English a transcript should be made by the pupil’s usual translator.

The pupil’s original test script must be sent to the marker along with the translated test script. Your headteacher must also complete the new notification form on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of NCA tools. This is available from Friday 8 May.

Getting help

Standards and Testing Agency

For guidance on ordering modified test materials.

April 17, 2015 02:59 PM

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Gnumeric 1.12.22 Released with ODF and XLSX Import/Export Improvements - Softpedia News


Softpedia News

Gnumeric 1.12.22 Released with ODF and XLSX Import/Export Improvements
Softpedia News
According to the internal changelog, Gnumeric 1.12.22 is here to improve ODF (Open Document Format) import/export of additional axes, to fix ODF export of styles for additional axes, as well as to simplify the export of SECH and SEC to ODF. This ...

April 17, 2015 03:32 AM

WebODF news

WebODF 0.5.7 released, bringing review-only modus to Wodo.TextEditor

The weeks since the last release were spent on improving support for annotations with ODT files. As a result this release now adds official support in Wodo.TextEditor for an alternative review-only modus (see the feature demo), where users can only add, edit and remove own annotations, but not modify the actual document content. Also have a few annotation related bugs been fixed.

So go to the Download page and update your deployment of webodf.js or the Wodo.TextEditor. Or check the demos (general, features).

April 17, 2015 12:00 AM

April 14, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: Schools financial value standard and assurance (SFVS)

Updated: Open format versions added of assessment form and additional resources document, to enable completion.

The SFVS helps schools to manage their finances and to provide assurance to the local authority that they have secure financial management in place.

The guidance applies to maintained schools and local authorities and is for:

  • governing bodies of maintained schools
  • management committees of pupil referral units
  • local authorities
  • other interested parties

As governing bodies have formal responsibility for the financial management of their schools, the standard is primarily aimed at them.

Local authority maintained schools are required to submit the SFVS annually to the authority. Local authorities use this information to inform their programme of financial assessment and audit.

Other schools are welcome to use this guidance and any of the other material associated with the standard.

SFVS 2015 assessment form

The assessment form informs the local authority’s submission of the dedicated schools grant chief financial officer assurance form, covering all maintained schools in their area. This is returned annually to the Department for Education.

SFVS 2015 support notes

This guidance provides clarification for each of the 25 questions on the assessment form. It also includes examples of good practice and details further support available to assist schools in addressing specific issues.

SFVS 2015 additional resources

The additional resources provides useful information and tools to help complete the SFVS effectively. It includes details to help schools to review the roles of governors, as well as staff in schools with financial management responsibility. It also includes a matrix to help schools to analyse the spread of relevant skills and competencies.

This advice will be reviewed in April 2016.

April 14, 2015 12:50 PM

Apache OpenOffice Blog

New UK online share plan reporting requirements - are you ready? - Lexology (registration)


New UK online share plan reporting requirements - are you ready?
Lexology (registration)
Unlike in previous years, the templates must be uploaded in ODF format and submitted to HMRC online - HMRC will no longer accept paper returns. The returns can only be submitted online (via the 'Employment-Related Securities' section of HMRC's PAYE ...

and more »

April 14, 2015 12:31 PM

New UK online share plan reporting requirements - are you ready? - Lexology (registration)


New UK online share plan reporting requirements - are you ready?
Lexology (registration)
Unlike in previous years, the templates must be uploaded in ODF format and submitted to HMRC online - HMRC will no longer accept paper returns. The returns can only be submitted online (via the 'Employment-Related Securities' section of HMRC's PAYE ...

and more »

April 14, 2015 12:31 PM

April 09, 2015

Charles H. Schulz

ODF in the age of Big Data

On the 25th of March 2015, my son was born and to me it is by far the most important event of the day. Yet the same day the Document Freedom Day was gathering people across the world to celebrate open standards for documents and spread the word against vendor lock-in. This year, two distinct announcements were made that should pave the way for a continued adoption of ODF across the various markets. The first one was the start of the LibreOffice OnLine project, and the other one was Microsoft announcing the availability of ODF export for Microsoft Office 365. If we add to these two news items the commitment of Google to properly support ODF inside Google Drive, things are getting exciting for ODF. I have attempted to explain the advantages of ODF and open standards in this blog for many years, like several others have done and are still doing. But when it comes to the benefits of ODF in the cloud and with regard to big data, there has not been, as far as I can tell, any real attempt at articulating the relevance of ODF at this level.

Describing the benefits of ODF can be at times rather tricky as many people are just used to the omnipresent MS Office file formats. They do not ask themselves too many questions, and may not readily perceive some key advantages of ODF. In a nutshell, it is important to explain as a backgrounder the difference between interoperability and compatibility and then move on to address issues such as vendor lock-in, public and transparent standardization processes, licensing and copyright of the norm, etc. One may even rely on the theory of network effects to explain how one proprietary, de facto standard can quickly come to impose itself in any given market to justify the coming of age of ODF. How does all this work for the cloud? Not so well, actually.dove-logo-2012

Cloud computing, and more specifically software as a service may not render all the points above moot, but it does change the paradigm. Consuming, editing, sharing documents in the cloud change the basic premise that in order for me to exchange content with someone, I need to have the same software and use the same file format. The basic premise does not go away, but becomes one possible use case among others. What rather happens is that I can create a document that I will share inside a group of peers or inside an organization. The file itself is stored in the cloud (public or private) and I will send a link, not a file with a specific file format, to the people I want to share the document with. They in turn can use the link to simply read, or edit, and share back the document. In this scenario there is no need to have high quality implementations of specific file format. The final output tends to become more and more a PDF as all the editing work has already happened and the document logic and formatting itself resides more on the server side that inside a sophisticated file format. So much for document freedom? Not so fast.

ODF and file formats specifications that are open standards cannot do much for cloud architectures or the policy of data usage for organizations or consumers. One may need other types of open standards, corporate and public policy, use cases, etc. Document file formats are expected to remain what they are. But as such they do convey real benefits even in the age of the cloud and the big data. After all, thousands of documents stored in a cloud and formatted in binary blurbs no one has the key for remain exactly as useless as they were without the cloud: useless docs.

With ODF, benefits exist even in the cloud:

  • Portability: You not only maintain the ability to use, reuse and archive your documents, you ensure that the portability of your existing and future documents across the cloud services and proivders you rely on today and will rely on tomorrow.
  • Reusability/data mining and intelligence: Because its specifications are published and its IPR allowing any kind of modification and implementation, ODF documents are a sound base for what’s often referred to as big data operations, such as data mining, extracting sense and value out f metadata inside and outside organizations.
  • Interoperability: This one may sound obvious, but it is not. There is a number of people out there who will readily tell anyone who cares to listen that office file formats (any of them) are on the verge of extinction, since you can do anything you need to do through software or software as a service that has html and pdf as their output. This is of course true. Oddly enough, I have yet to see a cross platform word processor or, spreadsheet or presentation software, or even a text editor that would offer the same ability foranyoneto edit html files that are complex, such as tables with pivot tables and working formulas or complex looking text documents. This may sound ludicrous, but the only tools doing this to this day are office suites that will have you compose your document first and then export it to html, with more or less integrity as to the formatting. Nothing else exists -and yes I’m aware of LaTeX, but this is about tools foreveryone. My point here is that ODF is essentially a compressed archive of xml files and additional contents (images, fonts), just like several other formats of its generation. Zipping several xml files together and keeping both the integrity of the content and its presentation is something that can be achievable on a server, and as such could enable ODF to become one of the pivot formats for documents and data in the cloud.
  • Auditability /control over your data: Because ODF documents have their specifications published and known, it is always possible to check their integrity and audit them while being stored on the cloud or “offloaded” from it. It is useful if you want to ensure that no one tinkered with your documents and if you want to avoid building a walled garden with the data you own and control but which only one or a handful of vendors own the real key.

ODF-logoOne may notice that the points listed above loosely match the main points usually mentioned when discussing the benefits of ODF in the more standard settings of the desktop. This is not surprising, but it was not necessarily intended; if anything this is a testimony to the value of a standard like ODF and its importance. The key point here is that when it comes to the cloud and big data, ODF is both a factor of transparency and innovation. This is something worth promoting and is a potential path to renewed success of ODF in the future.

by Charles at April 09, 2015 05:29 PM

April 08, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Office 365 skal få bedre ODF-støtte - digi.no


Office 365 skal få bedre ODF-støtte
digi.no
I fjor sommer valgte det britiske regjeringen hvilke filformater forvaltningen i Storbritannia skal bruke ved utveksling av dokumenter. Valget falt på ODF 1.2 (Open Document Format) for redigerbare dokumenter og PDF/A eller HTML for visning av dokumenter.

April 08, 2015 12:18 PM

April 07, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

86.222.9.87: /* Worldwide adoption */ Add a better ref for European Union

Worldwide adoption: Add a better ref for European Union

← Previous revision Revision as of 07:16, 7 April 2015
Line 256: Line 256:
 
|style="vertical-align:top;padding:0.25em 0.5em;"|
 
|style="vertical-align:top;padding:0.25em 0.5em;"|
 
{{startflatlist}}
 
{{startflatlist}}
* [[European Union]]<ref name="ec.europa.eu"/>
+
* [[European Union]]<ref name="ec.europa.eu"/> <ref>https://joinup.ec.europa.eu/community/osor/news/ec-recommends-supporting-open-document-format</ref>
 
** [[Belgium]]
 
** [[Belgium]]
 
** [[Croatia]]
 
** [[Croatia]]

by 86.222.9.87 at April 07, 2015 07:16 AM

April 06, 2015

Planet AbiWord

Alan Horkan: OpenRaster Metadata

Summary: plugin updated to allow round-trip of metadata.

OpenRaster does not yet make any suggestions on how to store metadata. My preference is for OpenRaster to continue to borrow from OpenDocument and use the same format meta.xml file, but that can be complicated. Rather than taking the time to write a whole lot of code and waiting do metadata the best way, I found another way that is good enough, and expedient. I think ordinary users will find it useful -- which is the most important thing -- to be able to round-trip metadata in the OpenRaster format, so despite my reservations about creating code that might discourage developers (myself included) from doing things a better way in future I am choosing the easy option. (In my previous post I mentioned my concern about maintainability, this is what I was alluding to.)

A lot of work has been done over the years to make the The GNU Image Manupilation Program (GIMP) work with existing standards. One of those standards is XMP, the eXtensible Metadata Platform originally created by Adobe Systems, which used the existing Dublin Core metadata standard to create XML packets that can be inserted inside (or alongside) an image file. The existing code creates an XMP packet, let's call it packet.xmp and include it in the OpenRaster file. There's a little more code to the load the information back in and users should be able to go to menu File, Properties and in Properties dialog go to the tab labelled Advanced to view (or set) metadata.

This approach may not be particularly useful to users who want to get their information out into other applications such as MyPaint or Krita (or Drawpile or Lazpaint) but it at least allows them not to lose metadata information when they use OpenRaster. (In the long run other programs will probably want to implement code to read XMP anyway, so I think this is a reasonable compromise, even though I want OpenRaster to stay close to OpenDocument and benefit from being part of that very large community.)

You can get the updated plugin immediately from the OpenRaster plugin gitorious project page.

If you are a developer and want to modify or reuse the code, it is published under the ISC License.

April 06, 2015 09:09 PM

April 03, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Format ODF : Microsoft cède à la pression - Linformatique.org


Format ODF : Microsoft cède à la pression
Linformatique.org
Après que les administrations du Royaume-Uni aient retenu le format ODF comme standard pour ses documents, Microsoft cède à la pression en acceptant d'ajouter la prise en charge de ce format par Office 365. C'est en 2009 déjà que la Free Software ...

April 03, 2015 10:27 AM

Microsoft week: Surface 3, Project Spartan and Windows 10 on more phones - V3.co.uk


V3.co.uk

Microsoft week: Surface 3, Project Spartan and Windows 10 on more phones
V3.co.uk
Microsoft said that it will update Office 365 to enhance support for the Open Document Format (ODF) championed by the government, allowing users to export files as ODF regardless of the format in which they were created. Microsoft makes cloud backup to ...

and more »

April 03, 2015 09:27 AM

UK Government Now Main Driver of ODF Advance: Kudos - ComputerworldUK (blog)


UK Government Now Main Driver of ODF Advance: Kudos
ComputerworldUK (blog)
After years of disappointments, and despite the usual lobbying/threats by a certain large US software company against the move, the Cabinet Office announced that it was officially adopting the Open Document Format (ODF) for sharing or collaborating on ...

April 03, 2015 08:37 AM

April 02, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Microsoft Finally Adopts Open Document Format at UK's Pressure - Softpedia


Softpedia

Microsoft Finally Adopts Open Document Format at UK's Pressure
Softpedia
The United Kingdom decided last year to adopt ODF as the standardized document format instead of Microsoft's XML despite pressure coming from the software giant, which has contracts with state departments and provides software and services, including ...

April 02, 2015 01:11 PM

H Microsoft θα υποστηρίζει το φορμά ODF - pestaola


H Microsoft θα υποστηρίζει το φορμά ODF
pestaola
Το φορμά ODF, ή αλλιώς Open Document Format, ανακοίνωσε ότι θα υποστηρίζει στη σουίτα της Office, η Microsoft μετά από διαμάχη με την βρετανική Κυβέρνηση. Συγκεκριμένα, το πρότυπο εγγράφων ODF, θα μπορεί κανείς να το χρησιμοποιεί στη σουίτα ...

April 02, 2015 12:08 PM

Document Freedom Day marked in Accra - spyghana.com


spyghana.com

Document Freedom Day marked in Accra
spyghana.com
He also cited the German, UK, Finnish, Brazilian and Indian governments as part of a group of leading countries that have adopted OpenDocument Formats (ODF) as a format of choice. There was heavy representation from the public sector as Ministries, ...

April 02, 2015 09:26 AM

April 01, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Experts welcome Government's move to ODF - ITProPortal


Experts welcome Government's move to ODF
ITProPortal
Mackintosh has recently released an educational paper to public sector personnel, demonstrating how easy it could be to switch to ODF and the risks that could be incurred by doing nothing. “ODF frees documents and data from their applications of origin ...
Microsoft to introduce Office 365 Open Document FormatDigital By Default News

all 2 news articles »

April 01, 2015 02:13 PM

Microsoft to introduce Office 365 Open Document Format - Digital By Default News


Microsoft to introduce Office 365 Open Document Format
Digital By Default News
Microsoft is to update its Office 365 platform to support the Open Document Format (ODF), following discussions with the Government Digital Service. The change, which has been championed by the GDS and Francis Maude, will allow users to export files as ...
Experts welcome Government's move to ODFITProPortal

all 2 news articles »

April 01, 2015 11:01 AM

Office 365 : Microsoft ajoutera l'export au format ODF 1.2 - Numerama


Office 365 : Microsoft ajoutera l'export au format ODF 1.2
Numerama
Dans un message publié vendredi dernier, Microsoft annonce que sa suite bureautique en ligne, Office 365, pourra gérer l'export des documents au format ODF 1.2. Une évolution quelque peu forcée, car Microsoft aurait préféré continuer à pousser Office ...

and more »

April 01, 2015 10:12 AM

March 31, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Microsoft allows government-approved ODF in Office 365 - TechRadar


TechRadar

Microsoft allows government-approved ODF in Office 365
TechRadar
Microsoft has finally relented in the face of the open document format (ODF) to allow documents created in Office 365 to be exported in the format thus adhering to UK government guidelines on document creation and sharing. The decision, which comes ...
Microsoft will adopt open document standards following government battleITProPortal
Microsoft agrees to use ODF 1.2 after meeting with MaudeCloud Pro
Microsoft adds ODF 1.2 to Office 365 to adhere to government demandsComputerWeekly.com
UKAuthority.com (press release) (blog)
all 7 news articles »

March 31, 2015 02:38 PM

ODF Wikipedia Page

Kravietz: /* Standardization */ link to article

Standardization: link to article

← Previous revision Revision as of 12:49, 31 March 2015
Line 140: Line 140:
 
*The [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards|OASIS]] Committee Specification [http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/download.php/19274/OpenDocument-v1.0ed2-cs1.pdf '''OpenDocument 1.0''' (second edition)] corresponds to the published ISO/IEC 26300:2006 standard. The content of ISO/IEC 26300 and OASIS OpenDocument v1.0 2nd ed. is identical.<ref>{{citation |url=http://standards.iso.org/ittf/PubliclyAvailableStandards/c043485_ISO_IEC_26300_2006(E).zip |title=ISO/IEC 26300:2006 |format=ZIP, PDF |publisher=ISO |accessdate=22 November 2009}}</ref> It includes the editorial changes made to address JTC1 ballot comments. It is available in ODF, HTML and PDF formats.
 
*The [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards|OASIS]] Committee Specification [http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/download.php/19274/OpenDocument-v1.0ed2-cs1.pdf '''OpenDocument 1.0''' (second edition)] corresponds to the published ISO/IEC 26300:2006 standard. The content of ISO/IEC 26300 and OASIS OpenDocument v1.0 2nd ed. is identical.<ref>{{citation |url=http://standards.iso.org/ittf/PubliclyAvailableStandards/c043485_ISO_IEC_26300_2006(E).zip |title=ISO/IEC 26300:2006 |format=ZIP, PDF |publisher=ISO |accessdate=22 November 2009}}</ref> It includes the editorial changes made to address JTC1 ballot comments. It is available in ODF, HTML and PDF formats.
 
*'''[http://docs.oasis-open.org/office/v1.1/OS/OpenDocument-v1.1.pdf OpenDocument 1.1]''' includes additional features to address accessibility concerns.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office#odf11 | title=OpenDocument 1.1 Specifications | year=2006 | accessdate=31 October 2006 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> It was approved as an OASIS Standard on 2007-02-01 following a call for vote issued on 2007-01-16.<ref>{{cite web | title=Approval of OpenDocument v1.1 as OASIS Standard | url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200702/msg00003.html | accessdate=6 February 2007 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> The public announcement was made on 2007-02-13.<ref>{{cite web | title=Members Approve OpenDocument Version 1.1 as OASIS Standard | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/news/oasis-news-2007-02-14.php | accessdate=15 February 2007 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> This version was not initially submitted to ISO/IEC, because it is considered to be a minor update to ODF 1.0 only, and OASIS were working already on ODF 1.2 at the time ODF 1.1 was approved.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.zdnet.co.uk/talkback/0,1000001161,39409700-39001068c-20093634o,00.htm|title=OOXML expert: ODF standard is broken|author=Peter Judge|publisher=ZDNet|date=2 May 2008 -- 14:47 GMT (07:47 PDT)|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> However it was later submitted to ISO/IEC (as of March 2011, it was in "enquiry stage" as Draft Amendment 1 - ISO/IEC 26300:2006/DAM 1) and published in March 2012 as "ISO/IEC 26300:2006/Amd 1:2012 — Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.1".<ref name="iso.org"/><ref name="http"/>
 
*'''[http://docs.oasis-open.org/office/v1.1/OS/OpenDocument-v1.1.pdf OpenDocument 1.1]''' includes additional features to address accessibility concerns.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office#odf11 | title=OpenDocument 1.1 Specifications | year=2006 | accessdate=31 October 2006 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> It was approved as an OASIS Standard on 2007-02-01 following a call for vote issued on 2007-01-16.<ref>{{cite web | title=Approval of OpenDocument v1.1 as OASIS Standard | url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200702/msg00003.html | accessdate=6 February 2007 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> The public announcement was made on 2007-02-13.<ref>{{cite web | title=Members Approve OpenDocument Version 1.1 as OASIS Standard | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/news/oasis-news-2007-02-14.php | accessdate=15 February 2007 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> This version was not initially submitted to ISO/IEC, because it is considered to be a minor update to ODF 1.0 only, and OASIS were working already on ODF 1.2 at the time ODF 1.1 was approved.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.zdnet.co.uk/talkback/0,1000001161,39409700-39001068c-20093634o,00.htm|title=OOXML expert: ODF standard is broken|author=Peter Judge|publisher=ZDNet|date=2 May 2008 -- 14:47 GMT (07:47 PDT)|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> However it was later submitted to ISO/IEC (as of March 2011, it was in "enquiry stage" as Draft Amendment 1 - ISO/IEC 26300:2006/DAM 1) and published in March 2012 as "ISO/IEC 26300:2006/Amd 1:2012 — Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.1".<ref name="iso.org"/><ref name="http"/>
*'''[http://docs.oasis-open.org/office/v1.2/OpenDocument-v1.2.pdf OpenDocument 1.2]''' includes additional accessibility features, [[Resource Description Framework|RDF]]-based metadata,<ref name="register">{{cite web|accessdate=18 April 2012|publisher=The Register|url=http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/09/12/libreoffice_extensions_and_templates_store_open/|date=3 October 2011|title=Open Document Format updated to fix spreadsheets|first=Gavin|last=Clarke}}</ref> a spreadsheet formula specification based on [[OpenFormula]],<ref name="register" /> support for digital signatures and some features suggested by the public. It consists of three parts: Part 1: OpenDocument Schema, Part 2: Recalculated Formula (OpenFormula) Format and Part 3: Packages. Version 1.2 of the specification was approved as an OASIS Standard on 29 September 2011.<ref name="odf12">{{citation |url=http://www.oasis-open.org/news/pr/odf-1-2-approval |title=Members Approve OpenDocument Format (ODF) Version 1.2 as OASIS Standard |date=5 October 2011 |accessdate=12 April 2012}}</ref> It has been submitted to the relevant ISO committee under the Publicly Available Specification (PAS) procedure in March 2014.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://isotc.iso.org/livelink/livelink?func=ll&objId=16678620&objAction=Open | format=PDF | title=Minutes of ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 teleconference meeting, 2014-04-16 | date=2014-04-24 | accessdate=2014-10-13}}</ref> As of October 2014, it has been unanimously approved as a Draft International Standard, some comments have been raised in process that need to be addressed before OpenDocument 1.2 can proceed to become an International Standard.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://isotc.iso.org/livelink/livelink?func=ll&objId=16810106&objAction=Open | format=PDF | title=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 N 103 Minutes of teleconference meeting of ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 2014-09-24, 23:00-00:00 UTC | date=2014-09-25 | accessdate=2014-10-13}}</ref>
+
*'''[http://docs.oasis-open.org/office/v1.2/OpenDocument-v1.2.pdf OpenDocument 1.2]''' includes additional accessibility features, [[Resource Description Framework|RDF]]-based metadata,<ref name="register">{{cite web|accessdate=18 April 2012|publisher=The Register|url=http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/09/12/libreoffice_extensions_and_templates_store_open/|date=3 October 2011|title=Open Document Format updated to fix spreadsheets|first=Gavin|last=Clarke}}</ref> a spreadsheet formula specification based on [[OpenFormula]],<ref name="register" /> support for [[digital signature]]s and some features suggested by the public. It consists of three parts: Part 1: OpenDocument Schema, Part 2: Recalculated Formula (OpenFormula) Format and Part 3: Packages. Version 1.2 of the specification was approved as an OASIS Standard on 29 September 2011.<ref name="odf12">{{citation |url=http://www.oasis-open.org/news/pr/odf-1-2-approval |title=Members Approve OpenDocument Format (ODF) Version 1.2 as OASIS Standard |date=5 October 2011 |accessdate=12 April 2012}}</ref> It has been submitted to the relevant ISO committee under the Publicly Available Specification (PAS) procedure in March 2014.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://isotc.iso.org/livelink/livelink?func=ll&objId=16678620&objAction=Open | format=PDF | title=Minutes of ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 teleconference meeting, 2014-04-16 | date=2014-04-24 | accessdate=2014-10-13}}</ref> As of October 2014, it has been unanimously approved as a Draft International Standard, some comments have been raised in process that need to be addressed before OpenDocument 1.2 can proceed to become an International Standard.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://isotc.iso.org/livelink/livelink?func=ll&objId=16810106&objAction=Open | format=PDF | title=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 N 103 Minutes of teleconference meeting of ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 2014-09-24, 23:00-00:00 UTC | date=2014-09-25 | accessdate=2014-10-13}}</ref>
   
 
===Future===
 
===Future===

by Kravietz at March 31, 2015 12:49 PM

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Microsoft adds ODF 1.2 to Office 365 to adhere to government demands - ComputerWeekly.com


TechRadar

Microsoft adds ODF 1.2 to Office 365 to adhere to government demands
ComputerWeekly.com
“While we already have great ODF support in Office 365, we've worked with GDS to understand the need to be able to create or import a document in another format and export it as ODF 1.2 and will be rolling out this new functionality to Office 365 in ...
Microsoft allows government-approved ODF in Office 365TechRadar
Government claims ODF support from Microsoft and GoogleUKAuthority.com (press release) (blog)
Microsoft will adopt open document standards following government battleITProPortal
Cloud Pro
all 7 news articles »

March 31, 2015 11:26 AM

March 30, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Microsoft promises Office 365 update for open document format - V3.co.uk


V3.co.uk

Microsoft promises Office 365 update for open document format
V3.co.uk
Microsoft will issue an update to Office 365 to enhance support for the Open Document Format (ODF) championed by the government, allowing users to export files as ODF regardless of the format they were created in. In a Microsoft blog post, Jesse ...
Microsoft adds ODF 1.2 to Office 365 to adhere to government demandsComputerWeekly.com
Government claims ODF support from Microsoft and GoogleUKAuthority.com (press release) (blog)
Microsoft agrees to use ODF 1.2 after meeting with MaudeCloud Pro
ITProPortal
all 5 news articles »

March 30, 2015 04:08 PM

March 27, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Your Summer Reading at Your Fingertips - Android Headlines - Android News


Android Headlines - Android News

Your Summer Reading at Your Fingertips
Android Headlines - Android News
ODF: This is an acronym for Open Document Format, the default format for the MS Office alternative called Open Office. Based on XML, it has more functionality than MOBI. PDF: Adobe Acrobat's files are extremely popular as there are a number for ...

March 27, 2015 11:47 PM

UK Government

Collection: Open Document Format (ODF) guidance

The UK government has selected ODF as the standard for editable office documents to be used across government.

The documents in this collection look at the ODF standard and related procurement issues. These include how to make sure applications and services dealing with editable documents are ODF-compliant.

March 27, 2015 11:40 PM

Guidance: Open Document Format (ODF): an introduction

The UK government has selected ODF as the standard for editable office documents to be used across government. ODF was selected as the standard for government because it:

  • allows citizens, businesses and other organisations to share and edit documents with government – and vice versa
  • allows people working in government to share and edit documents with each other
  • is compatible with a wide range of software
  • is a reliable long-term solution for storing and accessing information

This guidance gives further general information on the standard.

March 27, 2015 11:15 PM

Guidance: Open Document Format (ODF): user needs

Applications, products and services that government organisations use to deal with editable documents must be compliant with the ODF standard.

This guidance looks at how user needs analysis can help you select the best ODF-compliant document solution for your organisation.

March 27, 2015 11:14 PM

Guidance: Open Document Format (ODF): validators and compliance testing

The UK government has selected ODF as the standard for editable office documents to be used across government.

This guidance gives information on how to ensure applications dealing with editable documents are ODF-compliant.

March 27, 2015 11:14 PM

www.opendocsociety.org

Gov.uk puts ODF Guidance online

The UK government has selected ODF as the standard for editable office documents to be used across government. In order to assist the public and private sector with this major transition, it has published the first installment of a series of guidance documents around OpenDocument Format. The guidance was created in collaboration with OpenDoc Society and theOffice of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO).

The guidance provides a general introduction to the ODF standard, how to make sure applications and services dealing with editable documents are ODF-compliant.and procurement issues.

The Open Document Format (ODF) guidance is available online, and can also be useful for others that want to start working with ODF.

March 27, 2015 10:59 PM

Apache OpenOffice Blog

UK's first chief data officer to focus on making data a public asset - TechRepublic


TechRepublic

UK's first chief data officer to focus on making data a public asset
TechRepublic
Mike Bracken: I chaired the ODF meeting and the board that set the standards. The day of the vote was challenging. Data standards as a forcing function can only work in conjunction with the technical skill necessary to understand and implement them.

and more »

March 27, 2015 10:13 PM

UK Government

News story: Further progress made on open standards

In July 2014 the government selected open document standards for viewing and sharing government documents to make it easier for people to work with government.

The standards set out the document file formats that all government bodies should use. This makes it easier for citizens to access and work with the information that government publishes. It also enables civil servants to work more efficiently through sharing and collaborating on documents.

Since the standards were selected, departments have been publishing their implementation plans for moving to the agreed formats. Several departments have been planning user research and pilots for different software as part of the move to ODF (Open Document Format).

A number of departments are starting to publish in open formats, including the Department for Transport, Department for Communities and Local Government, Department of Health, Department for Work and Pensions, and HM Revenue and Customs. Many more departments will follow by the end of the year.

The government has also been working with a number of software providers to encourage them to improve their support for open formats in order to improve users’ experience when they share documents.

As part of this work, Microsoft has announced that it will include enhanced support for ODF in its cloud­ based software. Francis Maude met with Microsoft’s UK Country Manager, Michel Van der Bel, recognising Microsoft’s work on open standards.

Google has also announced that it brought forward its planned support for exporting presentations in this open format in addition to the existing support for text and spreadsheets. Users will soon be able to export text documents, spreadsheets and presentations in the latest open formats from two of the most commonly used products.

Minister for Cabinet Office, Francis Maude said:

The needs of users are at the heart of everything we do, and it’s great to see that major software suppliers such as Microsoft and Google are improving their support for open formats.

This will give people more choice about the software they use. This supports our digital by default agenda which is helping save citizens, businesses and taxpayers £1.2 billion over this Parliament as part of our long-term economic plan.

March 27, 2015 05:35 PM

March 26, 2015

UK Government

Corporate information: Research at HMRC

Updated: Published details of HMRC's programme of research for 2015 to 2016

Research reports

Our research and analysis publications can be found at HMRC publications: research and analysis.

Working papers series

The working papers are occasional papers on analytical issues, produced by or on behalf of HMRC.

Research activities funded by HMRC

The document below sets out current research activities funded by HMRC’s programme of research:

Contact the research team

If you have any questions about the HMRC research and analysis programme, contact:

Research Enquiries
Bush House (South West Wing), Floor 4
Strand
London
WC2B 4RD

Email: research.enquiries@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk

The HMRC Datalab

The HMRC Datalab allows approved researchers to access anonymised HMRC data in a government accredited secure environment.

The aim of the Datalab is to produce high quality analysis that benefits both HMRC and the wider research community.

Datalab projects are not commissioned by HMRC.

Data protection policies and standards

The Datalab follows HMRC’s strict data protection policies. There are restrictions on working practices to safeguard taxpayer confidentiality. To become an ‘approved researcher’, institutions have to submit a proposal and complete a short training course.

The Datalab is governed by the Commissioners for Revenue and Customs Act (CRCA) 2005, which dictates who HMRC can allow to access their data and for what reasons.

Research proposals for the Datalab must serve one of HMRC’s functions under the CRCA 2005. See IDG47000 - Disclosure for the purposes of HMRC’s functions for further information.

Organisations who can apply to use the Datalab

Access to the Datalab is open to researchers from a UK academic institution or government department.

HMRC also considers applications from not for profit organisations, such as independent research bodies.

International researchers will need to be affiliated, employed by, or studying at a UK university, government department or research organisation.

Applying to use the HMRC Datalab

To apply to use the HMRC Datalab:

  1. download and complete the Datalab project proposal form: HMRC Datalab Project Proposal Application (ODT, 24.7KB)

  2. email the form to: HMRC Datalab

It’s important that your proposal shows how your research will be:

  • useful for HMRC
  • improved using HMRC data rather than other available sources

The Datalab Team will then advise you on your project, and may request more detailed information.

Proposals are then evaluated against these criteria:

  • contribution to HMRC functions
  • long-term benefit to HMRC
  • research design and likely impact of the research
  • feasibility of the research

HMRC is more likely to support projects that are relevant to contemporary research questions.

All research in the HMRC Datalab must be independent, with the results intended for publication.

It may be useful to see this list of approved research proposals to help you with your submission:

HMRC research proposals approved to date

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email onlineservicessyndicationteam@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

These are topics currently of interest to HMRC which we would like to see explored in the HMRC Datalab:

  • efficiency improvements within HMRC
  • compliance
  • data issues
  • tax policy

Application submission deadlines

Applications are assessed on a quarterly basis:

  • 15 December 2014, to be discussed on 16 January 2015
  • 3 March 2015, to be discussed on 20 March 2015
  • 13 June 2015, to be discussed on 10 July 2015

Available datasets

These are the datasets currently available in the HMRC Datalab.

Other HMRC datasets

You can submit a proposal requesting the use of datasets not listed above, if the information you need is currently not available in the Datalab. Please consult our data catalogue for further information on the data that HMRC holds:

HMRC Data Catalogue

Using and matching your own data

You will need to describe the data you would like to bring and the HMRC Datalab Team will consider each dataset on a case by case basis.

Key identifiers have been removed from the HMRC Datalab datasets as part of the de-identification process so matching will have to be undertaken by HMRC.

Contact the HMRC Datalab

If you have any questions about the Datalab please contact us.

Bush House (South West Wing)
Strand
London
WC2B 4RD

Email: HMRC Datalab

March 26, 2015 04:11 PM

Detailed guide: Reuse DVSA learning materials

Updated: Updated the prices for the FileMaker Pro versions of the revision theory test questions.

About DVSA learning materials

DVSA encourages licensed reuse of its learning materials. You need a licence from DVSA to use its:

  • theory test revision question banks
  • simulated hazard perception test clips
  • photographs, images and graphics
  • other intellectual property

Types of licence you can get

There are 5 different types of licence that you can get:

  • royalty-based
  • royalty-based translation
  • education or research
  • British Sign Language
  • memorandum of understanding

The type of licence you’ll need will depend on how you want to reuse DVSA’s learning materials.

Royalty-based

A royalty-based licence lets you reuse DVSA’s learning materials in an English-language product you plan to make and sell. It lasts for 3 years, but you can renew it.

You must pay DVSA royalties for every 3 months. Royalties are typically 13% of net sales revenue (licensee income after tax) made from your products which are typically (but not exclusively) web-based or downloadable mobile phone applications, CDs, DVDs or books. Sales can also include revenue from subscriptions.

Sample terms: DVSA Crown copyright licence

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.publishing@dsa.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Royalty-based translation

You need this licence for commercial products resulting from your translation of DVSA learning materials into a language other than English. A product might also include elements such as learning English for theory and driving tests, if you wish to include this.

You can promote your translated products made under the licence free of charge on the Safe Driving for Life website.

Sample terms: DVSA translation licence

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.publishing@dsa.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Education or research

You need this licence to use licensed materials for educational or research purposes if you’re:

  • an educational establishment and you don’t charge pupils for access to the material and there’s no commercial gain
  • doing a research project or coursework and want to use its licensed material

You must confirm that the finished work is not copied, sold, published electronically or made available for sale.

British Sign Language

You need this licence if you want to translate DVSA’s material for the deaf or hard of hearing. You can produce and sell any type of product and don’t have to pay DVSA royalties on your sales.

Memorandum of understanding

You need a memorandum of understanding to reuse crown copyright material if you’re a non-UK government or other UK government department.

Apply for a licence

Fill in the licence application form if you want to apply for a licence.

Reuse theory test revision questions

DVSA does not publish the actual multiple-choice questions and answers used in the theory test, but you can reuse the DVSA theory test revision questions.

You can get revision questions for these test types:

  • car
  • motorcycle
  • large goods vehicle (LGV) and passenger carrying vehicle (PCV)
  • approved driving instructor (ADI) part 1

You can get the questions as either:

Number of test types PDF FileMaker Pro (without VAT)
1 Free £250
2 Free £425
3 Free £566
4 Free £715

You can buy FileMaker Pro CDs from DVSA by:

  • telephone 0115 936 6123 and pay securely by MasterCard, Visa, Delta and UK Electron, for immediate product despatch
  • email to crowncopyright@dsa.gsi.gov.uk to request an official invoice

Knowledge and understanding text

DVSA theory test revision question banks include ‘knowledge and understanding text’ which:

  • explains the context of a question
  • must be included with every question in your product
  • adds value to your product

Reuse hazard perception clips

You can get DVSA simulated hazard perception test clips. These clips aren’t used in the actual test, but look very similar.

DVSA offers:

  • 16 filmed video clips
  • 10 computer-generated imagery (CGI) clips

The DVD with the CGI clips also contains:

  • introductory video explaining how to use the clips
  • scoring window time frames

The CGI clips and the video clips all show potential hazards and hazards that develop into a situation that would make the user respond by changing speed or direction.

Clip details

Disc files - type Number of clips Price (without VAT)
CGI (MPEG-4) 10 £500
Video (MPEG-2) 8 (clips 1 to 8) £150
Video (MPEG-2) 8 (clips 9 to 16) £150
CGI and video 26 (10 CGI and 16 video clips) £600

You can buy hazard perception clips by:

  • telephone 0115 936 6123 and pay securely by MasterCard, Visa, Delta and UK Electron, for immediate product despatch
  • email to crowncopyright@dsa.gsi.gov.uk to request an official invoice

Reuse images and photography

DVSA has an image library on Flickr.

Press and media can get permission to reuse images for press purposes by sending an email to crowncopyright@dsa.gsi.gov.uk.

More extensive use of DVSA’s images is allowed by agreeing an image bank licence agreement. The cost per image is:

  • £100 plus VAT for up to 14 images
  • £75 plus VAT for 15 images and above

Form: request for images

This file is in an OpenDocument format

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.publishing@dsa.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Reuse The Highway Code

You can reuse The Highway Code on GOV.UK without asking for permission, but you need to follow the Open Government Licence.

How DVSA protects its copyrighted material

DVSA protects its material against unlicensed use and constantly monitors the use of its material. It will:

  • pursue any case where material has been used without its permission
  • take any necessary legal action in order to protect Crown copyright

You can report infringements to DVSA.

DVSA Crown Copyright

Intellectual Property Department
Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency
The Axis Building
112 Upper Parliament Street

Nottingham
NG1 6LP

Monday to Friday, 10am to 5pm.

How DVSA trades fairly

The Reuse of Public Sector Information Regulations 2005 (PSI) established a framework for making the reuse of information held by public bodies easier. PSI Regulations set out the rules that public sector bodies should follow when providing documents for reuse.

DVSA has a delegation of authority from the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office which enables it to license reuse of Crown copyright material the DVSA produces.

DVSA is also accredited to the Information Fair Trader Scheme (IFTS) by the Office of Public Sector Information. IFTS sets out the standard for public sector bodies and encourages reuse of copyright material, fairness and transparency.

Complain about how DVSA trades

You should email the DVSA Intellectual Property Team if you’re unhappy and don’t feel DVSA has followed the principles set out by the IFTS or the rules in the PSI regulations: crowncopyright@dsa.gsi.gov.uk

If you can’t settle matters through DVSA’s complaints procedure complain to The Office of Public Sector Information which operates the Information Fair Trader Scheme (IFTS).

March 26, 2015 02:09 PM

March 25, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

LibreOffice finally to go online - ZDNet


ZDNet

​LibreOffice finally to go online
ZDNet
LibreOffice's supporters would say yes, because it will be the only one that fully supports native Open Document Format (ODF). ODF is an Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) and ISO document standard.
LibreOffice heads to the cloud in bid to take on Microsoft and GoogleInquirer
LibreOffice in the browser, revealed in 2011, finally close to realityArs Technica
LibreOffice moves to the cloud to take on Office Online and Google DocsBetaNews
FierceCIO -Liliputing -Ubergizmo (blog)
all 21 news articles »

March 25, 2015 09:13 PM

LibreOffice Online sfida Office 365 e Google Docs - Webnews


Tom's Hardware

LibreOffice Online sfida Office 365 e Google Docs
Webnews
Questo prototipo verrà presto trasformato in un'applicazione cloud e diventerà l'alternativa open source a soluzioni proprietarie, come Google Docs e Microsoft Office 365, la prima a supportare in modo nativo lo standard Open Document Format (ODF).
LibreOffice Online, la sfida con Office si sposta sul cloudTom's Hardware

all 2 news articles »

March 25, 2015 05:12 PM

LibreOffice in the browser, revealed in 2011, finally close to reality - Ars Technica


Ars Technica

LibreOffice in the browser, revealed in 2011, finally close to reality
Ars Technica
"That proof of concept will be developed into a state of the art cloud application, which will become the free alternative to proprietary solutions such as Google Docs and Office 365, and the first to natively support the Open Document Format (ODF ...
LibreOffice Online will bring open source office suite to the cloudLiliputing
LibreOffice Online Is An Open Source Alternative To Office 365 And Google DocsUbergizmo (blog)
Upcoming LibreOffice Online wants to compete with Google Docs, Office 365FierceCIO

all 11 news articles »

March 25, 2015 03:16 PM

Why the UK government must adopt Open Document Format - The Information Daily


The Information Daily

Why the UK government must adopt Open Document Format
The Information Daily
But document freedom starts at the top, at government level, and on this day UK public sector bodies can really adhere to Open Standards Principles and enable UK industry innovation by making Open Document Format (ODF) their default file application.

March 25, 2015 02:07 PM

March 20, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: Key stage 2 tests: how to apply for a timetable variation

Updated: Updated for 2015

Some pupils may be able to take a test at a different time from the rest of the cohort, subject to strict criteria. Schools can use 2 types of timetable variation to change the 2015 test timetable (ODT, 50.4KB) . Both must be approved by the headteacher before submission to STA.

You can use a timetable variation to vary the test time:

  • to a different day, up to 5 school days after the day specified in the statutory timetable
  • between 7:00am and 7:00pm on the day of a test, so that an individual pupil can take a test on the scheduled date, but separately from the rest of the cohort

Under no circumstances may a test be taken before the day specified in the statutory timetable.

Apply for a timetable variation

You must complete the appropriate form on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of the NCA tools website.

All timetable variations must be approved by the headteacher before submission to STA. Schools can use 2 types of timetable variation. Both must be approved by the headteacher. Timetable variations can be used to change the statutory timetable:

  • by up to a week (5 school days) after the day specified in the statutory timetable
  • so that an individual child can take a test on the scheduled date, but separately from the rest of the cohort, between 7:00am and 7:00pm on the day of a test

Under no circumstances may a test be taken before the day specified in the statutory timetable.

Timetable variations will only be granted if:

  • pupils take the test(s) at the nominated time(s)
  • we are informed of any variation to the nominated time(s)
  • the pupils are kept apart from other pupils who have taken the test(s)
  • the pupils haven’t had access to the internet

It is maladministration for a school to vary the statutory test timetable without us giving permission or a school providing notification to us, as appropriate. This could lead to the annulment of pupils’ results. If you are in any doubt about the type of timetable variation to make, contact the national curriculum assessments helpline.

If you are in any doubt about the type of timetable variation to make, contact the national curriculum assessments helpline.

To move a test by up to 5 school days

Submit an online ‘Application for a timetable variation’ form on the ‘Access arrangements’ section of the NCA tools website to move the test to a different day. You can move a test up to 5 school days after the date specified in the statutory timetable. You must not administer the test to the pupil until we have approved your application.

We will consider your application if a pupil:

  • is absent on the day of the test due to illness
  • has an important appointment that can’t be rearranged, eg hospital appointments, court appearances and national and international sports participation
  • is observing a religious or cultural festival

We will also consider applications if your school:

  • is being used as a polling station for local or general elections, if it isn’t possible to continue with test administration in another part of the school
  • has to deal with unforeseeable problems, eg flooding
  • has a short working day, eg in a pupil referral unit
  • has received its test materials late, so that it can’t administer the tests on the scheduled dates

We will not allow the test timetable to be changed for:

  • family holidays
  • school activities, eg staff training events, field trips and excursions

Approval

If a pupil is absent on the day of the test, wait until the pupil has returned to school before making an application. We won’t accept applications unless we are sure which day the test will be taken.

You need to allow up to an hour for your application to be processed. Please bear this in mind when submitting your application. The pupil must not take the test until the application has been formally approved.

You will receive an automated email to tell you whether your application has been approved, rejected or that more information is required.

To vary the time of a test on the scheduled day

You must notify us if you are going to make a timetable variation for individual pupils between 7:00am and 7:00pm on the day of a test. In the interest of pupil welfare, pupils mustn’t take the tests before 7:00am or after 7:00pm.

You may move the test on the scheduled day if, for example:

  • a pupil is ill
  • a pupil arrives late
  • you need to move a test to the afternoon so you can arrange for a scribe because a pupil arrives in school on the morning of a scheduled test with a broken arm
  • you need to stagger the tests because you have a large cohort but not enough staff to administer the tests to all pupils at the same time
  • you have a number of pupils who need readers, translators or scribes and you don’t have enough staff to support them if they were to take the test at the same time

Approval

Submit an online ‘Notification of a timetable variation’ form using the ‘Access arrangements’ section of the NCA tools website before the test is administered to the pupil. We don’t approve or reject notifications so you don’t need to wait to administer the test to the pupil.

Headteachers’ responsibilities

Headteachers must make a judgement about any proposed timetable variations.

Schools must not administer a timetable variation unless the headteacher can confirm that:

  • the content of the test(s) has remained confidential
  • the pupil has not been in contact with any of the pupils who have already taken the test(s)
  • the pupil has not had access to the internet

Headteachers may decide to contact the pupil’s parents to confirm that the integrity of the tests has been maintained. If a pupil has had contact with pupils who have taken the test or access to the internet, the pupil must not take the test. They must be marked as absent on the attendance register.

This table summarises what action you need to take if a pupil is late or absent on the day of a test.

Circumstance Action required ‘Application’ or ‘notification’ of a timetable variation required?
A pupil arrives late but before the rest of the pupils have completed the test. The pupil should be given the full time to complete the test. No
A pupil arrives after the test has been completed, but before the rest of the cohort has left the test room. The pupil should be kept isolated from the rest of the cohort until the pupil’s rescheduled test has been administered. No
A pupil arrives after the test has been completed and the pupils have left the test room. The pupil should be kept isolated from the rest of the cohort until the pupil’s rescheduled test has been administered. Yes - notification of a timetable variation
The school is unable to administer a test to the whole cohort in 1 sitting. The school may administer the test in 2 or more sittings on the scheduled day of the test. No pupil should have the opportunity to communicate with any pupil who has already taken the test. Yes -notification of a timetable variation
A pupil is absent on the day of a test and returns to school within 5 school days of the published test date. The headteacher must first confirm that the pupil hasn’t had any contact with any other pupil who has already sat the test or had access to the internet. Yes - application for a timetable variation

Help and support

Standards and Testing Agency

For general enquiries about national curriculum tests.

March 20, 2015 03:28 PM

Form: VAT Mini One Stop Shop: Non-Union Return

Use this return template if you want to upload your Non-Union VAT MOSS Return to HMRC Online Services.

There are 2 versions of the template, both are OpenDocument format. The version you should download depends on the software you choose to use.

You can use:

  • the free LibreOffice software
  • Microsoft Excel - Microsoft Office 2010

Make sure you download the correct version of the template for your software.

March 20, 2015 12:20 PM

March 18, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: Criminal justice system: data standards forum guidance

Updated: Case Marker Descriptive v.2, Offence Initiation Code v.4 and National Court Codes v.6.0 added.

Overview

The CJS in England and Wales uses a commonly agreed set of data standards to support ICT communications between the systems used by criminal justice organisations (CJOs). These data standards are designed specifically to support the operation of the CJS. They are to be used with open data standards as defined in the government’s Open Standards Principles. The government’s open standards are selected by the Cabinet Office standards hub.

Common data standards are used by CJOs, their ICT suppliers and potential suppliers wishing to bid for CJS contracts. They are also used to support the data analytics of criminal justice information.

These standards are available to the public under the Open Government Licence.

The selection of the CJS data standards is made by the CJS Data Standards Forum. This is a technical forum which has representatives from the principal CJOs.

Geography

The CJS data standards apply to all CJOs in England and Wales.

Data standards catalogue

CJS data standards catalogue 5.0

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.comments@justice.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

CJS data standards catalogue 4.3

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.comments@justice.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

CJS data standards catalogue 4.3 to 5.0 change log

This file is in an OpenDocument format

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.comments@justice.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

The catalogue contains data standards to support the exchange of criminal justice information between different CJOs. Only the latest version of the catalogue is current. Earlier versions of the catalogue are provided to:

  • track changes between the different versions to help organisations understand the practical implications of the ‘before’ and ‘after’ versions of altered standards
  • provide historical versions of the standards, especially those with lists of values, which may be used for historical reporting purposes and statistical analysis of historical data

A change log specifically identifies the changes between 2 successive versions of the catalogue. Use the change log to rapidly identify items that have changed between a version of the catalogue and its immediate successor.

How to use the catalogue

Use the CJS data standards when sending criminal justice information from one CJO to another. The data standards don’t have to be used within CJOs.

Options for implementing the CJS data standards

Each CJO can decide how to implement the standards. It can either

  • map its internal data standards to the criminal justice data standards when sending information to a different CJO
  • adopt one or more of the CJS data standards as its internal data standard. This avoids the costs and performance impacts of mapping to the CJS data standards when sending information to a different CJO

Each CJO should make its decision on how to use the CJS data standards based on the contribution those standards make both in terms of the system’s functional and non-functional requirements and in the context of a total cost of ownership model.

Ensuring CJS data standards implementation

To ensure that the CJS data standards are used, CJOs should contractually specify that:

  • suppliers comply with the CJS data standards for the transmission of information both for ICT development and during service management
  • ICT suppliers monitor the CJS data standards web pages and always use the latest versions of those standards
  • the latest version of the CJS data standards is downloaded directly from the CJS data standards web pages
  • suppliers subscribe to receive updates to the CJS data standards

Subscribing to updates of this page will give you notifications of:

  • new versions of the catalogue
  • new versions of standards which have yet to be entered into a new version of the catalogue
  • updates to code lists

CJOs should also consider mapping the data standards to any supporting technical documentation such as logical data models and interface specifications.

Types of data standard

The catalogue includes 3 different types of data standard:

  • formatting standards
  • organisational structure standards
  • reference data standards

Formatting standards

These are concerned with the structure of a common type of data item such as dates or notes fields in a message or a database table. Use the common format for such items when you send information between different organisations. Formatting standards don’t have lists of actual values associated with them.

Organisational structure standards

Organisational structure standards describe the logical structure of an organisation. You can use these to work out the allocation of responsibilities in that they uniquely identify organisational units. This helps the correct transmission of information from one part of a CJO to part of a different CJO. Use organisational structure standards also to support reporting.

Reference data standards

A reference data standard categorises other data by using a commonly accepted list of mutually exclusive values. For example, a record for a person might include the person’s gender by use of the reference data standard ‘Gender Type Code’. Using a common list of such values across the CJS helps create a shared understanding of the correct interpretation of such classifications.

Code lists for data standards

Many of the lists for the reference data standards and organisational structure standards are comparatively small. In those cases the complete list for that standard is given in the catalogue.

A smaller number of standards are either too large to put in the catalogue or are subject to comparatively frequent change. In either of these cases the CJO that stewards the specific standard must provide that list. Each data standard in the catalogue specifies the organisation that acts as its steward.

Where the stewarding body is the Data Standards Forum itself, or where the body falls under the remit of the Ministry of Justice (MOJ), the lists of the data values are provided here.

Code lists for reference data standards

The lists of data values for reference data standards managed either by the Data Standards Forum or MOJ which are not in the catalogue are:

Code lists for organisational structure standards

The lists of data values for organisational structure standards are all elements of the ‘Organisation Unit (OU) Identifier’ structure of the data standards catalogue. The top level codes are specified in the catalogue. Elements below the top level are managed separately by the various CJOs. The code lists for HMCTS magistrates and Crown Courts are given below:

CJSE courts BC OU codes v7.4

This file is in an OpenDocument format

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.comments@justice.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

CJS standards and open standards

The CJS data standards are sector specific. Any interested party can use them, subject to the Open Government Licence. They are different from the open standards selected for government IT. The open standards are at the Cabinet Office’s standards hub.

If there’s a choice between the 2, then open standards must take precedence as they are mandated by Cabinet Office policy.

Engaging with the Data Standards Forum

The CJS Data Standards Forum undertakes technical management of the CJS data standards. All of the principal CJOs are represented on the forum.

If you’re a member of a CJO, contact your forum representative for any issues related to CJS data standards. This includes queries about particular standards, change requests to existing standards or requirements for new standards.

Suppliers should contact their contracting CJO to raise any issues relating to the CJS data standards. In turn, the CJO should contact their representative on the forum.

If your CJO doesn’t have a representative and you want to get involved, contact the chair at CJSDataStandards@justice.gsi.gov.uk

Changes to the standards

There are 2 types of process which could result in a change to the CJS Data Standards catalogue:

  • a CJO can raise a change request to create, update or retire a data standard
  • forum representatives may initiate changes as part of a continued review process of the contents of the catalogue.

Continued review

The Data Standards Forum continuously reviews the catalogue as a standing action. The aim is to produce a set of standards that is as small as possible while still being fit for purpose. It contributes to the ‘Value for Money’ agenda by focusing on existing business need to reduce the costs of compliance. Each forum meeting reviews a number of the standards to ensure that they’re relevant and meet the business need.

Notification of changes

Changes to standards will be posted here. They will stay here until they’ve been included into a new version of the catalogue.

National court code

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.comments@justice.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Legal aid status standard

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.comments@justice.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Case marker descriptive v.2

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.comments@justice.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Offence initiation code v.4

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request a different format.

If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email web.comments@justice.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

March 18, 2015 04:55 PM

March 16, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

League of Legends Daily Fantasy Contests at Vulcun Expand to $4 Million in ... - ODF Report


ODF Report

League of Legends Daily Fantasy Contests at Vulcun Expand to $4 Million in ...
ODF Report
Contests at Vulcun are much like that found on any DFS site, with daily and weekly contests where fantasy players compete against one another by drafting LoL players under a salary-cap format. Players score points based on their rosters' performance ...

and more »

March 16, 2015 07:19 PM

WebODF news

WebODF 0.5.6 released, adding two more toolbar options to Wodo.TextEditor

The last month of WebODF development saw mainly internal code cleanups. Just, no reason to withhold you the one new feature in Wodo.TextEditor and the one bug fix in WebODF.

Go to the Download page and update your deployment of webodf.js or the Wodo.TextEditor. Or check the demos.

March 16, 2015 12:00 AM

March 14, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

Yobot: WP:CHECKWIKI error fixes using AWB (10861)

WP:CHECKWIKI error fixes using AWB (10861)

← Previous revision Revision as of 08:16, 14 March 2015
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{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
 
{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
   
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS Standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC Standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] the 28th August 2001<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.open-std.org/keld/iso26300-odf/dkuug-std-010828.pdf | title=Meeting agenda for DKUUG STD 2001-08-28 - item 5.6 | accessdate=13 March 2015}}</ref>.
+
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS Standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC Standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] the 28th August 2001.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.open-std.org/keld/iso26300-odf/dkuug-std-010828.pdf | title=Meeting agenda for DKUUG STD 2001-08-28 - item 5.6 | accessdate=13 March 2015}}</ref>
   
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 - Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 - Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>
Line 175: Line 175:
 
*[[NeoOffice]]
 
*[[NeoOffice]]
 
*[[Okular]]
 
*[[Okular]]
*[[OnlyOffice | ONLYOFFICE]]
+
*[[OnlyOffice|ONLYOFFICE]]
 
*[[OpenOffice.org]]
 
*[[OpenOffice.org]]
 
*[[Scribus]] imports .odt and .odg
 
*[[Scribus]] imports .odt and .odg

by Yobot at March 14, 2015 08:16 AM

March 13, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

85.81.22.91: /* Standardization */

Standardization

← Previous revision Revision as of 17:21, 13 March 2015
Line 131: Line 131:
 
{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
 
{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
   
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS Standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC Standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] the 28th August 200<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.open-std.org/keld/iso26300-odf/dkuug-std-010828.pdf | title=Meeting agenda for DKUUG STD 2001-08-28 - item 5.6 | accessdate=13 March 2015}}</ref>1.
+
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS Standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC Standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] the 28th August 2001<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.open-std.org/keld/iso26300-odf/dkuug-std-010828.pdf | title=Meeting agenda for DKUUG STD 2001-08-28 - item 5.6 | accessdate=13 March 2015}}</ref>.
   
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 - Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 - Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>

by 85.81.22.91 at March 13, 2015 05:21 PM

85.81.22.91: /* Standardization */

Standardization

← Previous revision Revision as of 17:20, 13 March 2015
Line 131: Line 131:
 
{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
 
{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
   
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS Standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC Standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] the 28th August 2001.
+
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS Standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC Standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] the 28th August 200<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.open-std.org/keld/iso26300-odf/dkuug-std-010828.pdf | title=Meeting agenda for DKUUG STD 2001-08-28 - item 5.6 | accessdate=13 March 2015}}</ref>1.
   
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 - Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 - Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>

by 85.81.22.91 at March 13, 2015 05:20 PM

85.81.22.91: /* Standardization */

Standardization

← Previous revision Revision as of 16:38, 13 March 2015
Line 131: Line 131:
 
{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
 
{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
   
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS Standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules.
+
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS Standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC Standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] the 28th August 2001.
   
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 - Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 - Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>

by 85.81.22.91 at March 13, 2015 04:38 PM

March 12, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

UK Daily Fantasy Sports Could Follow in US Footsteps - ODF Report


ODF Report

UK Daily Fantasy Sports Could Follow in US Footsteps
ODF Report
First and foremost, the season-long format has to be kicked into touch and replaced by daily games and in-play opportunities. A live, single game, real-time product would hold great appeal to customers who are accustomed to watching sport while ...

March 12, 2015 12:02 PM

March 11, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: Academies revenue funding allocations

Updated: This page has been updated to include the pupil number adjustment calculator for the 2014 to 2015 academic year.

Academies revenue funding allocations

Academies (including special academies) are funded on the same basis as maintained schools. They receive annual funding allocations from the Education Funding Agency (EFA).

The A to Z of academies funding explains the main funding terms and acronyms and includes links to further information.

We use pupil numbers as the basis for most of your funding. These are taken from either your autumn census return or your agreed estimate of pupil numbers, depending on what your funding statement specifies as the basis for your funding.

EFA calculates funding using a local authority (LA) formula for mainstream provision, and place-led funding for high needs institutions. You’ll also get additional funding through the education services grant (ESG), which covers the cost of services LAs provide directly to maintained schools.

EFA provides funding for academies for the academic year, from September to August. This is different to maintained schools which are funded for the financial year, from April to March.

Most funding for academies comes from the general annual grant (GAG). More information on funding outside the GAG (which includes capital and pupil premium allocations) is available in our guide to estimating your allocation and in our short training video.

Each LA agrees funding factors and rates in consultation with their schools forum. For mainstream academies the funding formula incorporates pupil-led factors such as basic entitlement, deprivation, prior attainment, mobility and English as an additional language (EAL). These are combined with other factors based on the institution, such as a lump sum for premises costs, split site funding or a sparsity factor for small rural academies.

Allocations for 2015 to 2016 academic year

The funding allocation pack guides academies through their funding allocation. It includes sample tables and explains how each element is calculated.

A PNA calculator (ODS, 9.83KB) from EFA sent in July 2014 to all academies summarizes the main funding changes for the 2015 to 2016 academic year and sets out arrangements for the Education Services Grant (ESG).

You can also access our series of short training videos which explain the funding changes for academies and free schools in more detail.

The presentations cover:

  • the essentials of academy funding for the 2015 to 2016 academic year
  • funding for free schools, UTCs and studio schools
  • engaging with your schools forum
  • the education services grant - includes a worked example of the new tapered funding protection
  • the minimum funding guarantee - including capping and scaling
  • funding for new academies
  • funding outside your general annual grant

We also hosted two interactive webinars in October, offering participants the opportunity to ask a panel of experts questions about next year’s funding.

The webinars cover:

  • funding for academies: 2015 to 2016 academic year
  • funding for free schools, UTCs and studio schools

You can watch the recorded webinars now.

Allocations for 2014 to 2015 academic year

The funding allocation pack guides academies through their allocation.

Our series of online briefings and webinars sets out how we calculate your funding.

The presentations cover:

  • pre-16 mainstream funding – an overview of changes to how we calculate pre-16 schools funding and an update on recent changes
  • post-16 funding – an update of changes in post-16 funding
  • high needs funding for academies – an overview of high needs funding in mainstream and specialist provision
  • high needs funding for local authorities – understanding high needs funding from a LA perspective

The recorded webinars cover:

  • high needs funding for academies
  • high needs funding for LAs
  • funding for free schools, studio schools and university technical colleges

You can find a summary of the main changes to funding in the 2014 to 2015 academic year in a letter from Sue Baldwin, EFA Director of Academies and Maintained Schools, sent in June 2013.

16 to 19 funding allocations

Information about how colleges, schools and academies receive their allocations is available on our 16 to 19 funding allocations guidance page.

General annual grant

The general annual grant (GAG) is made up of:

  • school budget share – calculated on the same basis as for maintained schools in the same LA
  • education services grant (ESG) – allocated based on pupil numbers

As in the 2014 to 2015 academic year, in 2015 to 2016 the school budget share is protected by a minimum funding guarantee. This means per pupil funding will not fall by more than 1.5% compared with the previous year.

The minimum funding guarantee calculation excludes funding for sixth forms and places in special units.

Education services grant

Academies receive education services grant (ESG) at a rate of:

  • £140 per pupil in the 2014 to 2015 academic year
  • £87 per pupil in the 2015 to 2016 academic year

Special academies receive ESG at a rate of:

  • £595 per pupil in the 2014 to 2015 academic year
  • £369.75 per pupil in the 2015 to 2016 academic year

Alternative provision academies receive ESG at a rate of:

  • £525 per pupil in the 2014 to 2015 academic year
  • £326.25 per pupil in the 2015 to 2016 academic year

Academies are protected against significant budget reductions as a result of changes to the ESG rate in the 2015 to 2016 academic year. A supplementary guidance note provides additional information for academies and free schools about the changes to ESG and how the tapered protection will be applied.

High needs funding

Since 2013 local authorities have had an enhanced role in funding high needs pupils as the commissioner of education provision for these pupils. This means academies now receive funding from both EFA and the LA for pupils with high needs.

Mainstream academies (leaving aside any special units within them) are expected to contribute up to £6,000 from their school budget share to the cost of additional educational support provision for high needs pupils and students. Their notional SEN budget is indicated in table A of their funding allocation pack.

If your academy receives a post-16 funding allocation, your statement will show how much of the formula funding the LA has attributed to meeting SEN support costs.

Funding for special and AP academies, special units and resourced provision

Special academies and academies with special units or resourced provision receive £10,000 for each high needs place. Alternative provision (AP) academies receive £8,000 for each AP place.

Top-up funding above these levels, based on the assessed needs of the pupil and the cost of meeting these, should be agreed between the commissioning LA and the academy. Top-up funding is paid on a per-pupil basis, in or close to the real-time movement of the pupil. It is paid directly to academies by the LA. Top-up funding for pupils in AP can be paid directly by other academies and schools if they commission the places for those pupils.

Pupils in hospital education places in academies do not attract top-up funding.

LAs have the main responsibility for planning and funding provision for high needs students from 0-25 as set out in the Children and Families Act. It is EFA’s job to support them to do that in the most effective and coherent way.

The 2014-15 Revenue Funding Arrangements: Operational Information for Local Authorities sets out the timetable and process for implementing the 2014 to 2015 academic year high needs place funding arrangements.

A letter from the EFA’s National Director for Young People, Peter Mucklow, details high-needs funding for 5- to 25-year-olds in the academic year 2014 to 2015. Information for the 2015 to 2016 academic year is available on the 16-19 funding allocations guidance page.

Revenue funding outside the general annual grant

Academies receive funding outside their general annual grant (GAG) including:

Your academy may also receive capital funding from EFA.

Our presentation on funding outside the GAG includes more information about how and when these revenue streams are paid.

Funding responsibilities

Academies are responsible for services including:

  • education welfare services
  • pupil support (eg school uniform grants)
  • music services (eg instrumental tutors)
  • outdoor education including environmental and field studies (not sports)
  • therapies and health-related services that aren’t funded by the health service
  • visual and performing arts
  • monitoring national curriculum assessment
  • school improvement such as continuous professional development for staff
  • determination of terms and conditions of service for staff
  • early retirement and redundancy costs
  • asset management
  • producing financial accounts
  • internal auditing

The following duties remain with the LA and are not academies’ responsibility:

  • home to school transport, including transport for pupils with special educational needs (SEN)
  • education psychology, SEN statements and assessment
  • assigning SEN resources for pupils who require high levels of additional resource (this is a top-up to formula funding under a separate contract with the LA)
  • monitoring of SEN provision and parent partnerships
  • prosecuting parents for non-attendance
  • provision of pupil referral units for pupils no longer registered at an academy

Pupil number adjustment

Pupil number adjustment (PNA) is a calculation carried out by EFA using schools census data. The adjustment is applied to academies who received funding based on estimated pupil numbers to make sure their funding more accurately reflects the actual pupil numbers present during the year.

Estimate-funded academies have a threshold specified in their funding agreement. If an academy’s estimate of pupil numbers for the 2014 to 2015 academic year is within the tolerance of the threshold, no funding adjustment will be made through the PNA process. If the estimate differs from the actual pupil numbers by more than the threshold, the PNA calculates a funding adjustment, which may be a funding increase or decrease.

An academy’s estimated pupil numbers and the funding they received are used to produce a per pupil funding rate for academic year 2014 to 2015. This per pupil amount is multiplied by the number of pupils that are over or under the threshold tolerance when comparing the funded number against the autumn 2014 census return. Separate calculations are made for pre-16 school budget share funding, post-16 funding and ESG funding. An academy’s overall PNA is the sum of these three amounts.

Use our PNA calculator (ODS, 9.83KB) with the figures for your academy to see how the adjustment is calculated.

We will send PNA statements to academies in scope for PNA for the 2014 to 2015 academic year by mid-May.

March 11, 2015 04:16 PM

March 06, 2015

UK Government

Corporate information: Research at DfE

Updated: Added expression of interest for project 2014032.

Overview

Our social research aims to provide high-quality evidence to inform policy development and delivery.

Building evidence into our services is crucial to improving the education and children’s services we provide. We have published a collection of papers that set out research priorities and questions across education and children’s services for the research community, sector and department. We hope these papers will encourage researchers, sector organisations and practitioners to discuss research needs and contribute to the development of our policy and practice.

More information on how we are building evidence into education and children’s services is available from our ‘research priorities for education and children’s services’ collection.

Publications

You can find our published research reports from the last 5 years in GOV.UK’s publications section.

Archived publications

Our archived research is available from the National Archives.

Current research

You can find a list of our current research contracts on Contracts Finder.

Invitations to tender for new projects

You must submit an expression of interest (EOI) for us to consider you for an invitation to tender. Please use the expression of interest form (ODT, 29.7KB) .

To express an interest you must first register with us and will need your ID number.

To register, please complete the supplier registration form.

We let all contracts on the basis of our terms and conditions. We encourage you to read the EOI guide before submitting your EOI. There is also a style guide and template for contractors writing research publications.

Submission of an EOI does not guarantee an invitation to tender, and we do not routinely advise organisations that they have not been successful. However, we will provide feedback if you request it.

Supplier contact details

We are currently updating our records. Suppliers should provide their main contact details by 30 March 2015 to ensure they continue to receive our email alerts for research EOIs.

Please send the following information to louise.hardy@education.gsi.gov.uk:

  • reference number
  • supplier name
  • named contact
  • email address
  • type of organisation

Calls for expressions of interest

Project 2014032: longitudinal study of young people in England part 2, waves 4 to 7 (LSYPE2)

We invite expressions of interest (EOIs) for project 2014032: longitudinal study of young people in England part 2, waves 4 to 7 (LSYPE2) (PDF, 127KB, 4 pages) . The deadline for EOIs is 12pm on 13 March 2015. (We originally posted this EOI on 2 February 2015 and extended the deadline on 5 March 2015.)

Project 2014022: post-16 institutions omnibus

We invite expressions of interest for project 2014022: post-16 institutions omnibus (PDF, 240KB, 3 pages) . The deadline for EOIs is 5pm on 16 March 2015. (We originally posted this EOI on 23 February 2015 and extended the deadline on 4 March 2015.)

EOI ID number and general enquiries

If you have a query about your EOI ID number, please email us at: enquiries.rbu@education.gsi.gov.uk.

For all other enquiries about our research, please contact us.

Research centres

From 2010 to 2014 we worked with a number of independent organisations who provided us with national and international evidence. The following research centres were under contract with us and are now finishing the work we commissioned:

March 06, 2015 02:13 PM

March 05, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

Frietjes at 17:19, 5 March 2015

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| data7 = {{nowrap|'''[[Uniform Type Identifier|Uniform Type Identifier (UTI)]]'''<br/>{{plaincode|org.oasis.opendocument.text}}<ref name="uti">{{cite web |url=http://www.huw.id.au/filetypes.html#OpenDocument |title=Filetypes |author=Huw Alexander Ogilvie |accessdate=20 June 2008}}</ref>}}
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by Frietjes at March 05, 2015 05:19 PM

March 04, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

211.45.95.190: /* Application support */

Application support

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*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
+
*[[Polaris Office]]
 
Various organizations have announced development of conversion software (including ''plugins'' and ''filters'') to support OpenDocument on [[Microsoft]]'s products.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20060504015438308 | title=OpenDocument Foundation to MA: We Have a Plugin | date=4 May 2006 | accessdate=23 August 2006 | publisher=Groklaw}}</ref><ref>{{cite news | url=http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Microsoft_Office_to_get_a_dose_of_OpenDocument/0,130061733,139255766,00.htm | title=Microsoft Office to get a dose of OpenDocument | date=5 May 2006 | accessdate=6 December 2006|publisher=CNet}}</ref> {{asof|July 2007}}, there are nine packages of conversion software.<!--Commented out invalid reference <ref name="odf20070727"/>--> Microsoft first released support for the OpenDocument Format in Office 2007 SP2.<ref>{{cite web | title=Office 2007 SP2 Supports ODF | url=http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/164015/office_2007_sp2_supports_odf.html | date=28 April 2009 | publisher=PC World}}</ref> However, the implementation faced [[OpenDocument software#Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 support controversy|substantial criticism]] and the [[ODF Alliance]] and others claimed that the third party plugins provided better support.<ref name="sp2-fact-sheet">{{cite web | url=http://web.archive.org/web/20090611181719/http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf | title=Fact-sheet Microsoft ODF support | accessdate=24 May 2009 | quote=''MS Excel 2007 will process ODF spreadsheet documents when loaded via the Sun Plug-In 3.0 for MS Office or the SourceForge “OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office,” but will fail when using the “built-in” support provided by Office 2007 SP2.'' | publisher=odfalliance}}</ref> Microsoft Office 2010 can open and save OpenDocument Format documents natively, although not all features are supported.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/starter-help/differences-between-the-opendocument-text-odt-format-and-the-word-docx-format-HA010355788.aspx|title=Differences between the OpenDocument Text (.odt) format and the Word (.docx) format|work=office.microsoft.com}}</ref>
 
Various organizations have announced development of conversion software (including ''plugins'' and ''filters'') to support OpenDocument on [[Microsoft]]'s products.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20060504015438308 | title=OpenDocument Foundation to MA: We Have a Plugin | date=4 May 2006 | accessdate=23 August 2006 | publisher=Groklaw}}</ref><ref>{{cite news | url=http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Microsoft_Office_to_get_a_dose_of_OpenDocument/0,130061733,139255766,00.htm | title=Microsoft Office to get a dose of OpenDocument | date=5 May 2006 | accessdate=6 December 2006|publisher=CNet}}</ref> {{asof|July 2007}}, there are nine packages of conversion software.<!--Commented out invalid reference <ref name="odf20070727"/>--> Microsoft first released support for the OpenDocument Format in Office 2007 SP2.<ref>{{cite web | title=Office 2007 SP2 Supports ODF | url=http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/164015/office_2007_sp2_supports_odf.html | date=28 April 2009 | publisher=PC World}}</ref> However, the implementation faced [[OpenDocument software#Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 support controversy|substantial criticism]] and the [[ODF Alliance]] and others claimed that the third party plugins provided better support.<ref name="sp2-fact-sheet">{{cite web | url=http://web.archive.org/web/20090611181719/http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf | title=Fact-sheet Microsoft ODF support | accessdate=24 May 2009 | quote=''MS Excel 2007 will process ODF spreadsheet documents when loaded via the Sun Plug-In 3.0 for MS Office or the SourceForge “OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office,” but will fail when using the “built-in” support provided by Office 2007 SP2.'' | publisher=odfalliance}}</ref> Microsoft Office 2010 can open and save OpenDocument Format documents natively, although not all features are supported.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/starter-help/differences-between-the-opendocument-text-odt-format-and-the-word-docx-format-HA010355788.aspx|title=Differences between the OpenDocument Text (.odt) format and the Word (.docx) format|work=office.microsoft.com}}</ref>
   

by 211.45.95.190 at March 04, 2015 07:35 AM

March 03, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

Lagoset: /* External links */

External links

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* {{commons category inline|OpenDocument}}
 
* {{commons category inline|OpenDocument}}
 
* [http://opendocumentformat.org/ OpenDocumentFormat.org] Portal for consumers, business users and developers with information on OpenDocument format.
 
* [http://opendocumentformat.org/ OpenDocumentFormat.org] Portal for consumers, business users and developers with information on OpenDocument format.
  +
* [http://documentfreedom.org/index.en.html Document Freedom Day]
 
* [http://opendocsociety.org/ OpenDoc Society] Association with members around the world that promote best practices in office productivity such as OpenDocument format.
 
* [http://opendocsociety.org/ OpenDoc Society] Association with members around the world that promote best practices in office productivity such as OpenDocument format.
 
* [http://opendocumentfellowship.com/ OpenDocument Fellowship] Volunteer organization with members around the world to promote the adoption, use and development of the OpenDocument format.
 
* [http://opendocumentfellowship.com/ OpenDocument Fellowship] Volunteer organization with members around the world to promote the adoption, use and development of the OpenDocument format.

by Lagoset at March 03, 2015 06:52 AM

AndrewBUR: /* Software */ one mode software added

Software: one mode software added

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*[[NeoOffice]]
 
*[[NeoOffice]]
 
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*[[OpenOffice.org]]
 
*[[OpenOffice.org]]
 
*[[Scribus]] imports .odt and .odg
 
*[[Scribus]] imports .odt and .odg

by AndrewBUR at March 03, 2015 06:07 AM

February 28, 2015

UK Government

Supporting page: HMRC Campaigns

Updated: Campaign revenue figures updated - now correct as of 31 Jan 2015.

HMRC runs campaigns that are designed to:

  • help people to bring their tax affairs up to date
  • help them keep them that way, and
  • help stop them getting it wrong in the first place

These campaigns are part of HMRC’s approach to tax compliance.

How they work

We do this by:

  • providing opportunities that make it easier to be compliant – including offering an incentive to self-correct
  • bringing together a basket of activities to encourage voluntary compliance in the target population
  • looking for opportunities to inform customers who are entering the targeted risk area for the first time
  • using what is learned to help HMRC to improve processes to deal more efficiently with customers in the future

What they mean for customers

Our campaigns offer people a chance to get their tax affairs in order on the best possible terms. They provide tools and information to help people do that; to help people keep their affairs in order; and to help stop people getting it wrong in the first place.

Where people choose not to take the chance to set the record straight, we use the information, gathered before and during the campaign, to conduct follow-up work. This includes investigations and prosecutions.

If you think you have unpaid tax that you want to report and pay to us, please contact the Campaigns Voluntary Disclosure Helpline, 8.00 am to 6.30 pm, Monday to Friday, on 0845 601 5041

The results of HMRC campaigns

Since 2007, HMRC campaigns have collected over £610 million in tax from people coming to us, and over £395 million from a large number of follow-up activities.

Campaign Total Revenue as at 31 January 2015
Tax Health Plan £70,961,034
Tax Catch Up Plan £2,968,808
Value Added Tax Outstanding Returns £38,696,945
VAT Initiative £22,271,526
Plumbers Tax Safe Plan £22,166,777
Electricians Tax Safe Plan £15,803,609
E Marketplaces £9,379,361
Direct Selling £505,617
Tax Returns Initiative £86,279,162
My Tax Return Catch Up £33,137,621
Property Sales £8,245,782
Offshore Disclosure Facility £512,190,000
Offshore New Disclosure Opportunity £156,923,070
Campaigns Consequential Disclosures* £5,536,921
Let Property £20,017,365
Health Well Being Tax Plan £936,315
Second Income Update due 2015/16
Credit Card Sales Update due 2015/16
Solicitors Tax Campaign Update due 2015/16
TOTAL £1,006,019,913

*These disclosures are from individuals not targeted by any Campaign who have voluntarily come forward and used the Campaigns disclosure line to tell us about undeclared income.

Current HMRC campaigns

Solicitors Tax Campaign

The Solicitors Tax Campaign gives solicitors working in a partnership or company, or as an individual, the chance to tell HMRC about any income they haven’t declared.

Find out more about HMRC’s Solicitors Tax Campaign, or call the Solicitors Tax Campaign helpline between 8am and 8pm Monday to Friday on 0300 013 4749.

Credit Card Sales Campaign

The Credit Card Sales Campaign is aimed at individuals or businesses that accept credit or debit card payments. It offers them an opportunity to bring their tax affairs up to date.

Find out more about HMRC’s Credit Card Sales Campaign, or call the Credit Card Sales Campaign Hotline between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday on 0300 123 9272.

Second Incomes Campaign

The Second Incomes Campaign offers employees who have not declared additional untaxed income a chance to pay the tax they owe.

Find out more about HMRC’s Second Incomes Campaign, or call the Second Incomes Campaign Hotline between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday on 0300 123 0945.

Let Property Campaign

The Let Property Campaign targets the residential property letting market and offers a chance for landlords in this sector to get up to date or put right any errors they have made and then remain compliant. So far over 9,500 landlords have taken the opportunity to bring their tax affairs up to date.

Find out more about HMRC’s Let Property Campaign or call the Let Property Campaign Hotline between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday on 03000 514479.

Past HMRC Campaigns

Health and Wellbeing Campaign

The Health and Wellbeing campaign gave professionals working in Health and Wellbeing an opportunity to bring their tax affairs up to date on the best possible terms. This included physiotherapists, chiropractors, chiropodists, osteopaths, occupational therapists, those working in homeopathy, acupuncture, nutritional therapy, reflexology, nutrition, as well as psychology, speech therapy, arts therapy.

The deadline for making your disclosure and paying what you owe was 6 April 2014.

People who missed the opportunity can still make a disclosure by using the Campaign Voluntary Disclosure Helpline on 0300 123 1077 - Monday to Friday, 8am to 6:30pm.

The original guidance on how to make your voluntary disclosure is still available.

My Tax Return Catch Up Plan

The My Tax Return Catch Up Plan was aimed at people who received a tax return or notice to file a return for years up to and including 2011-12, and who had not acted. People had until 15 October 2013 to file all their outstanding tax returns and pay what they owe. After that, HMRC began to take a much closer look at their tax affairs. By using this campaign to come forward, customers received the best terms available.

Property Sales Campaign

The Property Sales campaign is a chance for people to bring their tax up to date if they have sold a residential property, in the UK or abroad, that’s not their main home. If people made a profit but have not told HMRC, they might not have paid the right amount of tax. To take advantage of the best possible terms people needed to have voluntarily disclosed income or gains and to have paid what they owed by 6 September 2013.

The disclosure deadline has now passed and our follow up compliance work focused on those who should have come forward is underway. Although the terms on offer during the disclosure are no longer guaranteed, it will still be better for anyone who has something to tell us about to come forward.

Direct Selling campaign

The Direct Selling campaign gave people involved in direct selling, who had not told HMRC about all of their income, a chance to bring their tax up to date on the best possible terms. Direct selling is where people sell directly to customers usually door to door or in customers’ homes or the workplace.

The voluntary disclosure opportunity offered as part of the Direct Selling campaign closed on 28 February 2013. Cases are now being considered for follow-up action.

VAT Outstanding Returns campaign

The VAT Outstanding Returns campaign was a chance for those who ere registered for VAT, but had not sent in all of their VAT Returns, to bring their VAT Returns and payments up to date on the best possible terms.

The voluntary opportunity offered as part of the VAT Outstanding Returns campaign closed on the 28 February 2013. The identification of cases suitable for compliance checks and criminal investigation is ongoing.

Tax Return Initiative

The Tax Return Initiative was aimed at higher rate tax paying individuals who had been sent a Self Assessment (SA) tax return, or had been told they should send one in, but had not submitted a return.

The Tax Return Initiative voluntary disclosure opportunity closed on 2 October 2012. HMRC is following up against those targeted in this campaign who chose not to take part. This includes issuing estimates of the amount of tax owed and collecting payment through court action or by using a debt collection agency.

e-Marketplaces campaign

The e-Marketplaces campaign was a chance for those who use electronic marketplace websites to buy and sell goods as a trade or business, but who had not paid what they owe, to bring their tax affairs up to date on the best possible terms.

The voluntary disclosure opportunity offered as part of the e-marketplaces campaign (e-MDF) closed in September 2012. HMRC is successfully continuing to use the data gathered to support the campaign to identify those who should have come forward but chose not to. HMRC are looking for cases suitable for investigation.

Tax Catch Up Plan for tutors and coaches

The Tax Catch Up Plan is for those who provide private tuition, instruction and coaching, either as a main or as a secondary income - which they choose not to tell HMRC about. Whilst the time limited voluntary disclosure opportunity closed on 31 March 2012 it is still better to come forward to HMRC as we continue to look for cases suitable for investigation

The VAT Initiative

The VAT Initiative campaign focused on individuals and businesses operating at or above the VAT threshold who had not registered for VAT. Those that came forward were given help by HMRC to pay what they owe and to claim VAT repayments. HMRC continues to help those that came forward to get their affairs in order.

HMRC continues to follow up on those businesses where the information held suggests that the VAT turnover threshold had been exceeded. This could lead to the compulsory registration of businesses and a possible ‘failure to notify’ penalty of up to 100 per cent of the VAT due.

Electricians’ Tax Safe Plan

The Electricians Tax Safe Plan was an opportunity for people who install, maintain and test electrical systems, equipment and appliances, who had not told HMRC about all their income in the past, to bring their tax affairs up to date on the best possible terms.

The voluntary disclosure opportunity closed in August 2012.

Plumbers’ Tax Safe Plan

The Plumbers Tax Safe Plan was a chance for people working as plumbers, gas fitters, heating engineers and associated trades, who had not told HMRC about all their income in the past, to bring their tax affairs up to date on the best possible terms.

The voluntary disclosure opportunity closed in August 2011. As at 30 June 2012, six plumbers have been convicted with more expected to follow.

Medics Tax Health Plan

The Medics Tax Health Plan first offered a voluntary opportunity for doctors and dentists, with tax to pay, to get their affairs up to date with the benefit of a fixed penalty.

The voluntary opportunity closed in June 2010. The disclosures included one individual payment of over £1 million by a doctor and one of over £300,000 by a dentist. Our risk and intervention programme is ongoing so for those who need to it is still better to come forward to HMRC.

New (offshore) Disclosure Opportunity

The New Disclosure Opportunity was designed to provide one final chance for UK based individuals and businesses, with unpaid tax linked to an offshore account or asset, to make a disclosure and put their affairs in order. 15 individual payments over £500,000 four of which were in excess of £1 million.

The New (offshore) Disclosure Opportunity was open to those with any offshore interest, assets or accounts. Data from financial institutions was provided and HMRC has used this and other information to open thousands of enquiries.

Offshore Disclosure Facility

The Offshore Disclosure Facility was the first HMRC campaign and ran between April and November 2007.

The Offshore Disclosure Facility was based on data obtained from five major UK financial institutions. Like the New (offshore) Disclosure Opportunity, it gave people or businesses with unpaid tax connected to an offshore account or asset an opportunity to make a full disclosure of liabilities and to pay duties, interest and penalties due.

The campaign was the first of its kind and provided information and understanding of the way offshore accounts and assets were used that was carried into the first full offshore campaign (the New (offshore) Disclosure Opportunity) covering all institutions offering offshore facilities to UK based entities. After the ODF HMRC made follow up enquiries, mainly based on data gathered following a successful application for notices on five major UK financial institutions.

February 28, 2015 09:23 AM

February 27, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Review: LibreOffice 4.4 raises the bar - InfoWorld


InfoWorld

Review: LibreOffice 4.4 raises the bar
InfoWorld
Attempting to make more than the most trivial changes to it, however, triggered a warning: I'd need to save the document as ODF, not OOXML, to preserve all details. I knew full well what might happen if I didn't. In another document I'd converted ...

February 27, 2015 11:12 AM

February 23, 2015

Planet KDE

Protocol Plugfest: opening closed doors to interoperability together

Protocol Plugest - http://www.protocolsplugfest.com/europe/

The "world wide web" has been such an amazing success in large part because it was based on open protocols and formats that anyone can implement and use on a level playing field. This opened the way for interoperability on a grand and global scale, and is why http and HTML succeeded where many others failed previously.

Unfortunately, not all areas of computing are as blessed with open protocols and formats. Some are quite significant, too, with hundreds of millions of people using and relying on them every single day. Thankfully, some brave souls have stepped up to implement these proprietary protocols and formats using open technology, specifically as free software. The poster child for this is Samba and the ubiquitous file and print server protocols from Microsoft.

Such formats abound and are a key component in every day business (and personal) computer usage, and since the protocols are often not as open as we'd like it can be tricky to provide free, open and interoperable implementations of them. Again, just ask the Samba team. Yet bringing the option of freedom in technologies used by business and government around the world relies on these efforts.

The free software community is moving rapidly on all fronts of this landscape, and to help ensure that our efforts actually do work as expected and that we are sharing useful information with each other between projects, a fantastic conference has been set up: the Protocol Plugfest which will be held in Zaragoza, Spain on May 12-14. This is much like the ODF Plugfest which focuses on office file formats, but with a stronger focus on protocols found in products such as Active Directory, Exchange, Sharepoint, CIFS and LDAP.

The call for papers is now open and several speakers have already been confirmed. This include Kolab System's own Georg Greve who will be speaking on the topic of "Achieving All-Platform Interoperability", reflecting on Kolab's path towards supporting the wide world of clients, data formats and wire protocols such as ActiveSync.

He will also have some exciting announcements to make in this area during the presentation, so I hope everyone interested in free software collaboration suites will keep an eye on the event!

The other speakers include people from LibreOffice, Samba, Zentyal and ... Microsoft! Yes, I count no fewer than six speakers from Microsoft who are there to speak about the various protocols they've inflicted upon the world. This kind of engagement, while not perfect compared to having proper open standards, will certainly help push forward the state of support for all the protocols of the world in free software products.

I hope to see many of you there!


by Aaron Seigo (aseigo) at February 23, 2015 11:08 AM

February 19, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Standard ways to make data go further - The Guardian


Standard ways to make data go further
The Guardian
As for Microsoft Office, Law should note that it supports ODF formats, and that its default format since 2007 has been Office Open XML. This was standardised as ECMA-376 in 2006 and, in later versions, as ISO/IEC 29500 in 2008. In fact, Microsoft ...

February 19, 2015 07:36 PM

February 18, 2015

UK Government

February 17, 2015

UK Government

Guidance: Call for bids: support for British detainees overseas facing the death penalty

Background

In support of our aim to deliver a consistently high quality consular service for British nationals in detention overseas, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office works in partnership with other organisations to provide specialist assistance to British prisoners in death penalty cases. This supports a long-standing UK policy to oppose the use of the death penalty in all circumstances.

There are currently 13 British nationals on death row in Africa, South Asia, Asia Pacific and the Americas.

There are 31 British nationals at risk of the death penalty in South Asia, South East Asia, the Caribbean, the Middle East and the Americas.

Proposals are invited from organisations with relevant expertise to form a partnership with the FCO to help deliver our policy aims.

Objective

To support Consular Directorate in our objective to deliver consistently high quality consular assistance for British nationals in detention overseas facing the death penalty and to work to avoid British nationals being executed.

We welcome bids from organisations that can support this aim.

Examples of appropriate support include but are not limited to: assistance in finding a local lawyer; working in partnership with local lawyers; securing expert opinions e.g. medical assessments; consultation with detainees/their families on case strategies.

Consular Directorate provides impartial support. Our partners should demonstrate how they will deliver support to British nationals consistently, ensuring that all cases receive due attention.

Proposal design

The anticipated maximum budget for this work is £110,000 per annum. Bids are welcomed for a proportion of this funding or for the total amount, dependent on whether organisations have the expertise and resources to deliver support regionally or globally.

Potential partners are encouraged to submit realistic but ambitious proposals, including where this would require a higher total amount of funding.

Proposals should identify in which countries the partner is able to deliver effective support. If an extension of existing networks could be achieved through a higher level of funding, or through dedicated staffing, this should be explained and will be considered. Funding will not, however, be provided to cover organisational overhead costs not directly attributable to the support of British nationals’ cases and the objectives of Consular Directorate.

Who can bid?

Project proposals are welcomed from organisations with experience of providing support to prisoners or defendants facing capital punishment overseas. Organisation should be in possession of all relevant licences and permits to enable delivery of the requirements in the countries where the services will be delivered.

We are looking for organisations which can demonstrate some or all of:

  • legal expertise
  • regional expertise, including knowledge of and access to local legal networks
  • experience of working with British nationals
  • experience or understanding of productive working with government
  • capacity to deliver assistance in challenging contexts

Criteria for assessing project proposals

The Board will consider projects against the following criteria:

  • Strategy, outcomes and impact:
    • Closeness of fit with Consular Directorate’s objectives
    • Co-ordination with, and support to other Foreign and Commonwealth Office human rights objectives, such as ensuring British nationals receive treatment and access to justice in line with international norms or working to set global trial, sentencing and detention standards;
    • Evidence of sustainability and scalability;
    • Past delivery of implementer;
  • Design of proposal:
    • Clarity;
    • Coherence and relevance of purpose, outputs, activities and indicators;
  • Evidence of wider stakeholder support and engagement;

  • Detailed budget breakdown and value for money;

  • Monitoring and evaluation planning to demonstrate delivery against objectives.

Guidelines for submitting a project proposal

Proposals must be submitted on the standard FCO project proposal form (ODT, 34.1KB) . These should be submitted in full and in accordance with the guidance provided. Incomplete proposal forms will not be reviewed. If any aspect of the form requirements is unclear to applicants, we strongly recommend consultation with the Prisoner Human Rights Team ConsularPrisoner.Team@fco.gov.uk.

Key points to note are:

  • Language used should be clear and succinct.

  • Part A should include both qualitative and quantitative milestones, which should be referenced in reporting.

  • Part B of the form should be completed by the FCO. Proposals submitted by external partners should however include annexed evidence of previous experience delivering similar projects.

  • In addition to the requirements outlined above, proposals must provide details of how the work will be monitored. Monitoring methods should be robust, transparent and include scope for beneficiary input. The methods identified should be designed to give a meaningful assessment of impact. The FCO places a strong emphasis on evaluation. Proposals for delivery valued £100,000 and over may be independently evaluated.

  • Proposals must demonstrate a full assessment of project risks. Partners should identify any risks which might apply to the project, what steps will be taken to mitigate those risks, and how risks will be reviewed during the delivery cycle. The partner must have an internal due diligence process in place to monitor these risks. Proposals will not be approved without realistic risk assessments, including duty of care to staff.

  • Projects should be budgeted in Pounds Sterling and demonstrate value for money and should be ex-VAT. Budgets should give a detailed breakdown of cost per activity per month and unit costs for staff where possible. Travel and accommodation costs incurred should be in line with FCO guidance.

  • Strong proposals will spread the cost throughout the year, avoiding where possible spend in the final quarter.

Terms of contracts

Agreements will be subject to FCO standard contract terms:

  • Payment will be made quarterly in arrears for quarters 1-3, and monthly in arrears for the final quarter.
  • The financial year runs from 1 April 2015 – 31 March 2016. We intend to contract on a yearly cycle, renewable for up to three financial years.
  • Quarterly reports should be submitted to the FCO on the standard FCO template. This should make clear how funds have been allocated to and used to support, the cases of British nationals.
  • Draft copies of our standard T and Cs are available on request

Timing

Proposals should be submitted to the FCO Prisoner Human Rights Team by 1700 GMT 06 March 2015 at ConsularPrisoner.Team@fco.gov.uk.

Contact

Eleanor French 0207 008 0144

February 17, 2015 04:46 PM

Statistical data set: Live tables on planning application statistics

Updated: Added revised table 151.

Live tables

Table P120: district planning authorities - planning applications received and decided

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Table P121: district planning authorities - planning decisions by type of authority and speed of decision

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Table P122: district planning authorities - planning decisions by type of authority and speed of decision

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Table P123: district planning authorities - planning decisions by speed, performance agreements and type of development

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Table P124: district planning authorities - planning decisions by speed, performance agreements and type of development

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Table P124A: district planning authorities - planning decisions by development type and local authority

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Table P125: district planning authorities - major planning decisions by speed, performance agreements and type of development

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Table P126: district planning authorities - major planning decisions by speed, performance agreements and type of development

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Table P127: district planning authorities - enforcement action

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Table P128: district planning authorities - regulation 3 and 4 consents granted and applications for determination

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Table P129: district planning authorities - enforcement action by authority

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Table P130: district planning authorities - enforcement action by authority

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Table P131: district planning authorities - planning decisions, by development type, speed of decision and authority

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Table P132: district planning authorities - planning decisions, by development type, speed of decision and authority

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Table P133: district planning authorities - applications received, decided, granted and delegated, environmental statements received and flow of applications by authority

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Table P134: district planning authorities - applications received, decided, granted and delegated, environmental statements received and flow of applications by authority

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Table P135: district planning authorities - planning decisions on major and minor residential development by authority

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Table P136: district planning authorities - planning decisions on major and minor residential development by authority

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Table P137: district planning authorities - planning decisions on major and minor traveller caravans by authority

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Table P138: district planning authorities - planning decisions on major and minor traveller caravans by authority

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Table P139: 'county matters' planning authorities - planning applications received, decided and granted by type of authority

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Table P140: 'county matters' planning authorities - planning decisions decided and granted by type of authority and type and size of development

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Table P141: 'county matters' planning authorities - planning decisions decided and granted by type of authority and type and size of development

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Table P142: 'county matters' planning authorities - planning decisions by speed of decision

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Table P143: 'county matters' planning authorities - planning applications received, decided and granted and regulation 3 and 4 consents by authority

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Table P144: 'county matters' planning authorities - planning applications received, decided and granted and regulation 3 and 4 consents by authority

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Table P145: 'county matters' planning authorities - enforcement action

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Table P146: 'county matters' planning authorities - decisions on minerals applications by type of development

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Table P147: 'county matters' planning authorities - decisions on waste planning applications by type of development

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Table P148: 'county matters' planning authorities - planning decisions decided and granted by nature of site, type of development and nature of application

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Table P149: 'county matters' planning authorities - planning decisions by speed, size of site and type of development

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Table P150: 'county matters' planning authorities - reasons given for decisions taking over 8 weeks

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A revised county matters table (P151b) within table P151 covering the 8 quarters to 30 September 2014 was published on 17 February 2015 to replace the table that was published on 18 December 2014.

The revised table is consistent with the figures for July to September 2014 included in the version of table P143 that was published on 18 December 2014.

Table P151: district and 'county matters' planning authorities performance - speed of decisions

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Table P152: district and 'county matters' planning authorities performance - quality of decisions

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Experimental tables

Table E1: 'district matters' decisions on applications for prior approvals for permitted developments, by local planning authority

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Table E2: 'district matters' decisions on applications for prior approvals for permitted developments, England

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Table E3: 'county matters' decisions on applications for prior approvals for permitted developments, by local planning authority

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Reference tables

Table 1: PS1 – England totals: July to September 2014

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Table 2: PS2 – England totals: July to September 2014

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Table 3: CPS1 – England totals: July to September 2014

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February 17, 2015 12:00 PM

February 13, 2015

Planet AbiWord

Alan Horkan: OpenRaster and OpenDocument: Metadata

OpenRaster is a file format for the exchange of layered images, and is loosely based on the OpenDocument standard. I previously wrote about how a little extra XML can make a file that is both OpenRaster and OpenDocument compatible. The OpenRaster specification is small and relatively simple, but it does not do everything, so what happens if a developer wants to do something not covered by the standard? What if you want to include metadata?

How about doing it the same way as OpenDocument, it does not have to be complicated. OpenDocument already cleverly reused the existing Dublin Core (dc) standard for metadata, and includes a file called meta.xml in the zip container. A good idea worth borrowing, a simplified example file follows:

Sample OpenDocument Metadata[Pastebin]

(if you can't see the XML here directly, see the link to Pastebin instead.)

I extended the OpenRaster code in Pinta to support metadata in this way. This is the easy part, it gets more complicated if you want to do more than import and export within the same program. As before the resulting file can renamed from .ora to .odg and be opened using OpenOffice* allowing you to view the image and the metadata too. The code is Pinta OraFormat.cs is freely available on GitHub under the same license (MIT X11) as Pinta. The relevant sections of are "ReadMeta" and "GetMeta". A Properties dialog and other code was also added, and I've edited a screenshot of Pinta to show both the menu and the dialog at the same time:

[* OpenOffice 3 is quite generous, and opens the file without complaint. LibreOffice 4 is far less forgiving and gives an error unless I specifically choose "ODF Drawing (.odg)" as the file type in the Open dialog]

February 13, 2015 01:04 AM

February 12, 2015

WebODF news

WebODF 0.5.5 released, adding a "documentModified" state and security fixes

A new year, so time for a first new update. To protect against losing data, the editor now has a state "documentModified", by which can be checked if the document has been edited since the last processing or saving. Also have a few security holes been closed.

So go to the Download page and update your deployment of webodf.js or the Wodo.TextEditor. Or check the demos.

February 12, 2015 12:00 AM

February 11, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

La importancia de los formatos de documento abiertos - Hipertextual


Hipertextual

La importancia de los formatos de documento abiertos
Hipertextual
Para los que no lo conozcáis aún, el ODF (Open Document Format) es una familia internacional de estándares para guardar y procesar información que trasciende aplicaciones y proveedores específicos. Lo importante de este formato es su capacidad de ...

February 11, 2015 12:42 AM

February 09, 2015

UK Government

Guidance: Share Incentive Plan (SIP) template

Updated: Revised templates and ERS bulletin published to coincide with the release of the revised checking service on the tax platform.

On this page you’ll find the attachment you need to tell HMRC about SIP options granted during the tax year, along with guidance notes to help you fill out the worksheet.

Get the right software

You’ll need software that can open Open Document Format (ODF) files, such as a recent version of Microsoft Excel or the free LibreOffice. Download the latest version of LibreOffice.

February 09, 2015 11:20 AM

Guidance: Save As You Earn (SAYE) template

Updated: Revised templates and ERS bulletin published to coincide with the release of the revised checking service on the tax platform.

On this page you’ll find the attachment you need to tell HMRC about SAYE options granted during the tax year, along with guidance notes to help you fill out the worksheet.

Get the right software

You’ll need software that can open Open Document Format (ODF) files, such as a recent version of Microsoft Excel or the free LibreOffice. Download the latest version of LibreOffice.

February 09, 2015 11:19 AM

Guidance: Other ERS schemes or arrangements template

Updated: Revised templates and ERS bulletin published to coincide with the release of the revised checking service on the tax platform.

On this page you’ll find the attachment you need to tell HMRC about other Employment-Related Shares options granted during the tax year, along with guidance notes to help you fill out the worksheet.

Get the right software

You’ll need software that can open Open Document Format (ODF) files, such as a recent version of Microsoft Excel or the free LibreOffice. Download the latest version of LibreOffice.

February 09, 2015 11:18 AM

Guidance: Enterprise Management Incentives (EMI) template

Updated: Revised templates and ERS bulletin published to coincide with the release of the revised checking service on the tax platform.

On this page you’ll find the attachment you need to tell HMRC about EMI options adjusted, replaced, released, lapsed or cancelled and any taxable or non-taxable exercise of options during the tax year, along with guidance notes to help you fill out the worksheet.

Get the right software

You’ll need software that can open Open Document Format (ODF) files, such as a recent version of Microsoft Excel or the free LibreOffice. Download the latest version of LibreOffice.

February 09, 2015 11:18 AM

Guidance: Company Share Option Plan (CSOP) scheme template

Updated: Revised templates and ERS bulletin published to coincide with the release of the revised checking service on the tax platform.

On this page you’ll find the attachment you need to tell HMRC about CSOP options granted during the tax year, along with guidance notes to help you fill out the worksheet.

Get the right software

You’ll need software that can open Open Document Format (ODF) files, such as a recent version of Microsoft Excel or the free LibreOffice. Download the latest version of LibreOffice.

February 09, 2015 11:15 AM

February 04, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Paid development pays off for LibreOffice for Android - InfoWorld


InfoWorld

Paid development pays off for LibreOffice for Android
InfoWorld
A full made-for-touch, ODF-capable editor is the goal, however. The developers demonstrated their work building a tiled display system that interacts with the LibreOffice engine. ... for open source development using donated funds, may well pay off. By ...

February 04, 2015 11:18 AM

ODF Wikipedia Page

Ziphit: /* Software */ Removing bad links

Software: Removing bad links

← Previous revision Revision as of 03:34, 4 February 2015
Line 179: Line 179:
 
*[[SoftMaker Office]]
 
*[[SoftMaker Office]]
 
*[[Sun Microsystems]] [[StarOffice]]
 
*[[Sun Microsystems]] [[StarOffice]]
*[[WebODF]]
 
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />

by Ziphit at February 04, 2015 03:34 AM

February 03, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

You can now petition the European Union to 'fix my document' - opensource.com


You can now petition the European Union to 'fix my document'
opensource.com
Many parts of the EU are legitimately working hard to implement ODF, the open document format for office applications. Fixmydocument.eu will help them better identify software and documents that are presenting the most pressing and immediate problems.

February 03, 2015 11:11 AM

February 02, 2015

UK Government

Corporate information: Working for British High Commission Abuja

Updated: Updated Finance and programme manager vacancy

Vacancies

Job Advert Finance and Programme Manager (ODT, 84.6KB)

The closing date is Friday 13 February 2015 and no further applications will be accepted after that date.

February 02, 2015 10:25 AM

February 01, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

IBM Redpaper Guides You To IBM i Modernization Tools - IT Jungle


IBM Redpaper Guides You To IBM i Modernization Tools
IT Jungle
The tool also supports the new Open Display File (ODF) format, which looksoftware is pushing as a way to build new IBM i from scratch without involving any DDS whatsoever. The company also sells smartclient, which uses Microsoft's .NET APIs for ...

and more »

February 01, 2015 09:39 PM

January 30, 2015

UK Government

Statistical data set: Live tables on Energy Performance of Buildings Certificates

Updated: Updated tables.

These tables show data from certificates lodged on the Energy Performance of Buildings Registers since 2008, including average energy efficiency ratings, energy use, carbon dioxide emissions, fuel costs, average floor area sizes and numbers of certificates recorded.

Due to large file sizes some tables may take a while to download.

Table A1: Energy Performance Certificates for all properties by total floor area and type of property

This file is in an OpenDocument format

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If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email alternativeformats@communities.gsi.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Table D1: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by energy efficiency rating

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Table D2: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by environmental impact rating

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Table D3: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by floor area, size, energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs

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Table D4(a): domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of transaction

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Table D4(b): domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of transaction and tenure

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Table D5: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of property and energy efficiency rating

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Table D6: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of property and environmental impact rating

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Table D7: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of property, average energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs

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Table LA1: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings in each local authority, by energy efficiency rating

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Table LA2: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings in each local authority, by environmental impact rating

This file is in an OpenDocument format

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Table NB1: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by energy efficiency rating

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Table NB2: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by environmental impact rating

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Table NB3: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by floor area, size, energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs

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Table NB4: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by type of property

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Table NB5: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by type of property and energy efficiency rating

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Table NB6: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by type of property and environmental impact rating

This file is in an OpenDocument format

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Table NB7: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by type of property, average energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs

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Table A: non-domestic Energy Performance Certificates by energy performance asset rating

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Table B: non-domestic Energy Performance Certificates by property group

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Table DEC1: Display Energy Certificates by local authority and energy performance operational rating

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Table DEC2: Display Energy Certificates - annual energy use and carbon dioxide emissions

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January 30, 2015 09:30 AM