Planet ODF

May 19, 2016

EC Joinup

May 17, 2016

HackerNews

ODF Wikipedia Page

The Last V8: /* Adoption */ + ref

Adoption: + ref

← Previous revision Revision as of 19:39, 17 May 2016
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** [[Italy]]
 
** [[Italy]]
 
** [[Netherlands]]<ref>{{cite web |title=ODF 1.2 on Dutch "apply or explain" list |url=https://lijsten.forumstandaardisatie.nl/open-standaard/odf12}}</ref>
 
** [[Netherlands]]<ref>{{cite web |title=ODF 1.2 on Dutch "apply or explain" list |url=https://lijsten.forumstandaardisatie.nl/open-standaard/odf12}}</ref>
** [[Poland]]
+
** [[Poland]]<ref>{{cite web |url=http://isap.sejm.gov.pl/DetailsServlet?id=WDU20120000526 |title=Rozporządzenie Rady Ministrów z dnia 12 kwietnia 2012 r. w sprawie Krajowych Ram Interoperacyjności, minimalnych wymagań dla rejestrów publicznych i wymiany informacji w postaci elektronicznej oraz minimalnych wymagań dla systemów teleinformatycznych |publisher=Internetowy System Aktów Prawnych |date= |accessdate=2016-05-17}}</ref>
 
** [[Portugal]]<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.esop.pt/portugal-publishes-open-standards-catalogodf-pdf-and-several-other-standards-are-mandatory/ |title=ESOP » Portugal publishes open standards catalog. ODF, PDF and several other standards are mandatory |publisher=Esop.pt |date= |accessdate=2013-05-01}}</ref>
 
** [[Portugal]]<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.esop.pt/portugal-publishes-open-standards-catalogodf-pdf-and-several-other-standards-are-mandatory/ |title=ESOP » Portugal publishes open standards catalog. ODF, PDF and several other standards are mandatory |publisher=Esop.pt |date= |accessdate=2013-05-01}}</ref>
 
** [[Slovakia]]
 
** [[Slovakia]]

by The Last V8 at May 17, 2016 07:39 PM

May 14, 2016

Google News

Italijanska vojska izbrala LibreOffice - Računalniške Novice


Računalniške Novice

Italijanska vojska izbrala LibreOffice
Računalniške Novice
S tem bo dokumentni format ODF postal uradni format italijanske vojske in za izmenjavo dokumentov znotraj obrambnega ministrstva. Italijansko obrambno ministrstvo naj bi s tem pristopom v nekaj letih privarčevalo med 26 milijoni in 29 milijoni evrov ...

and more »

May 14, 2016 02:35 PM

Talijanska vojska prelazi na LibreOffice - Bug.hr


Bug.hr

Talijanska vojska prelazi na LibreOffice
Bug.hr
Talijansko Ministarstvo obrane službeno je objavilo kako u idućih nekoliko godina planira u potpunosti prijeći s Microsoftovog paketa uredskih alata Office na alternativu otvorenog koda LibreOffice. Također planiraju prihvatiti ODF kao službeni format ...

May 14, 2016 05:39 AM

Upcoming Features of LibreOffice 5.2 - Softpedia News


Upcoming Features of LibreOffice 5.2
Softpedia News
But that's not all, as LibreOffice Calc also ships with a new statistical wizard as an alternative to supplement the package Microsoft Excel analysis, support for wildcards that are compatible with the XLS, XLSX, and ODF 1.2 document formats, support ...

May 14, 2016 02:08 AM

May 12, 2016

Google News

26-29 millió eurót tervez spórolni az olasz hadsereg a LibreOffice-ra váltással - Hungarian Unix Portal


26-29 millió eurót tervez spórolni az olasz hadsereg a LibreOffice-ra váltással
Hungarian Unix Portal
Tavaly szeptemberben jelentette be a LibreItalia Association, hogy az olasz hadseregnél folyamatban van a LibreOffice irodai programcsomagra és Open Document Format-ra (ODF) váltás. Azóta sok hír nem érkezett a projekt felől, egészen mostanáig.

May 12, 2016 09:05 PM

Italian military to drop Microsoft Office for LibreOffice - Neowin


Neowin

Italian military to drop Microsoft Office for LibreOffice
Neowin
LibreItalia says it has committed to developing a series of educational and training courses to help Italian servicemen and MoD members learn LibreOffice software and the Open Document Format (ODF), and migrate away from Microsoft's Office suite of ...

and more »

May 12, 2016 08:40 PM

The Document Foundation Planet

Rosemary Sebastian: About this blog

Hello, I’m Rosemary, aka roses in the IRC. This year, my project proposal with LibreOffice got accepted for GSoC. In this blog, I’ll be writing mainly about my work for the project, which is “Saving ODF XML of Change-tracking as a Sequence of Pre-defined Changes“.

 

 


May 12, 2016 07:16 PM

Google News

LibreOffice : la Défense italienne espère 29 millions d'euros d'économies - Silicon


LibreOffice : la Défense italienne espère 29 millions d'euros d'économies
Silicon
En pleine bataille de chiffre et de communication, le ministère italien de la Défense avait annoncé en septembre dernier qu'il se convertissait à LibreOffice et au format ODF. Un accord a été passé avec l'association LibreItalia pour installer la suite ...

May 12, 2016 02:47 PM

Преходът от Microsoft Office към LibreOffice ще икономиса на италианските военни 29 милиона евро - kaldata.com


kaldata.com

Преходът от Microsoft Office към LibreOffice ще икономиса на италианските военни 29 милиона евро
kaldata.com
... на Microsoft с open-source. Според италианските военни, преходът от Microsoft Office към LibreOffice ще даде икономия от 29 милиона евро. А в италианската армия ще бъде одобрен за използване формата ODF (Open Document Format).

and more »

May 12, 2016 01:11 PM

May 11, 2016

Slashdot

Italian Military To Save Up To 29 Million Euro By Migrating To LibreOffice

Reader prisoninmate writes: Following on last year's bold announcement that they will attempt to migrate from proprietary Microsoft Office products to an open-source alternative like LibreOffice, Italy's Ministry of Defense now expects to save up to 29 million Euro with this move. We said it before, and we'll say it again, this is the smartest choice a government institution can do. And to back up this statement, the Italian Ministry of Defense announced that they expect to save between 26 and 29 million Euro over the next few years by migrating to the LibreOffice open-source software for productivity and adopting the Open Document Format (ODF).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

by manishs at May 11, 2016 03:00 PM

Google News

Italian Military to Save Up to 29 Million Euro by Migrating to LibreOffice - Softpedia News


Softpedia News

Italian Military to Save Up to 29 Million Euro by Migrating to LibreOffice
Softpedia News
... this statement, the Italian Ministry of Defense announced that they expect to save between 26 and 29 million Euro over the next few years by migrating to the LibreOffice open-source software for productivity and adopting the Open Document Format (ODF).

May 11, 2016 10:05 AM

May 09, 2016

EC Joinup

Italian military to save 26-29 million Euro by migrating to LibreOffice

The Italian Ministry of Defence expects to save 26-29 million Euro over the coming years by using LibreOffice. The LibreDifesa project aims to eventually migrate all of the organisation's well over 100,000 desktops to the open-source office productivity suite. Taking into account the deadlines set by our current Microsoft Office licences, we will have 75,000 (70%) LibreOffice users by 2017, and an additional 25,000 by 2020, says General Camillo Sileo, Deputy Chief of Department VI, Systems Department C4I, for the Transformation of Defence and General Staff.

read more

by Adrian Offerman at May 09, 2016 11:19 AM

Planet KDE

Let’s make Text and Vectors Awesome: 2016 Kickstarter

Even while we’re still working on fixing the last bunch of bugs for what promises to become a great 3.0 release, we’re taking the next step! It’s time for the 2016 Krita Kickstarter!
Last year, our backers funded a big performance improvement in the form of the Instant Preview feature and wickedly cool animation support, right in the core of Krita. And a bunch of stretch goals, some of which are already implemented in 3.0, some of which will come in Krita 3.1.

This year, we’re focusing on two big topics: the text tool and the vector layers. Plus, there are a lot of exciting stretch goals for you to vote on!

Krita’s text tool used to be shared with the rest of KOffice, later Calligra. It’s a complete word processor in a box, with bibliography, semantic markup, tables, columns and more! But not much fine typographic control and besides… It has always been a bad fit, it has never worked well!

Now is the time to join us and make it possible to create an awesome text tool, one that is really suitable to what you need text for in Krita: real typographic and artistic control, support for various languages, for translations, for scripts from all over the world. One integrated text tool that is easy to use, puts you in control and can be extended over the years with new features.

texteditor-mock

The second topic is vector graphics. It’s related to the text tool, since both are vector layer features. Currently, our vector graphics are defined in the OpenDocument Graphics format, which is fine for office applications, but not great for artwork. There’s already a start for supporting the SVG standard instead, and now’s the time to finish the job! And once we’re SVG to the core, we can start improving the usability of the vector tools themselves, which also suffer from having been designed to work in a word processor, spreadsheet or presentation application. Now that Krita is no longer part of a suite of office applications, we can really focus on making all the tools suitable for artists! Let’s make working with vector art great!

FlyingKonqui-animtim

And of course, there are a bunch of stretch goals, ranging from small ones to a really big stretch goal, Python scripting. Check out the kickstarter page for a full list!

support-krita-2016-3

One of the fun parts of backing a kickstarter project are the rewards. For a Krita kickstarter, these are mostly small, fun things to remember a great campaign by. But we’re trying to do something special this year! After the kickstarter is funded, we will commission Krita artists from all over the world to create art for us that we will use in various rewards!

by Krita News at May 09, 2016 04:36 AM

May 07, 2016

The Document Foundation Planet

Charles Schulz: Not so fast, open standards!

My friend Andrew Updegrove wrote a surprising essay in his latest blog post about the irrelevance of open standards. More exactly his point, if I understood correctly, was that open standards were becoming irrelevant as a topic as everyone is using and relying on them, and the software industry can no longer afford to play the game of vendor lock-in towards customers, partners and competitors. If that’s Andy’s opinion I happen to disagree with it, but only partially. Let me explain.

Open Standards fading into oblivion as something that’s not interesting and yet so mundane because everyone would rely on them is somewhat of a good news I think. It is likely that some parts of the industry, such as cloud computing players, cannot afford to “invent” brand new proprietary platforms. Whatever you do, if this particular case is an example, is to design and develop a platform, an infrastructure or a service that is either OpenStack based, or at least fully capable of interfacing itself through Swift, AWS, Azure compatible or otherwise open APIs. While these are not all open standards, it’s a good thing: downstream players want to be compatible, but the upstream, major cloud technologies are open to some large extent as well as it is in their interest to be used and relied upon by the largest part of the market.

There are however some hiccups with vendor lock-in, in cloud computing or elsewhere. It just hasn’t disappeared. The lock-in still exists through proprietary or otherwise unimplementable file formats; through undocumented protocols and weak or non existent reversibility clauses. Vendor lock-in has not gone away, it has become more subtle by moving up the ladder. If your entire business processes are hosted and run by a cloud service provider there may be some good reasons for you to have made that choice; but the day the need for another provider or another platform is felt the real test will be to know if it is possible to back up your data and processes and rebuild them elsewhere and in a different way. That’s an area where open standards could really help and will play an increasing role. Another area where open standards are still contentious is multimedia: remember what happened to Mozilla in 2015 when they chose to embed proprietary, DRM-riddled codecs because of industry pressure.

Now Andrew suggests that the market is turning to FOSS the same way they first turned to open standards. True enough, FOSS has never been as popular as it is today, but I do not believe for a moment that it is because I.T. professionals or their clients understand what Free & Open Source Software is. That’s unfortunate of course, and we do need to keep in mind that open standards and FOSS, while being quite compatible, are two widely different things.

To come back to the original point, I believe something more incidental may explain his perception. ODF-logoFrom about 2006 to 2010, the world of open standards was full of exciting initiatives, global battles for market domination or liberation. Let’s mention a few of these: html5, microformats, RDF, ebXML and of course ODF, with the OOXML saga. That’s a lot in 4 to 5 years even for the tech industry. In some cases these standards have defined today’s state of the art, in others, they’re found anywhere on the Internet and the enterprise. After these years, open standards continued to grow of course; but the politics cooled down a bit and the bubble deflated.

Open standards are not going away, they still matter and I’m sure they will come back in the spotlight just like with pretty much everything in the I.T. industry. Look, we’re talking again about A.I. I can’t wait for the moment we’ll be bombarded by some paradigm shift in e-commerce or with the fat client as in, fat client and thin server in opposition to the thin client and the fat server where all the logic comes from the server. But I digress. Open standards help everyone who want to have a part to play in the game. Whether that standard ends up being used or not, replaced or opposed by another open standard is not what matters: that’s the life of standards. I’m confident we will see their importance being highlighted again for everyone soon or later.

May 07, 2016 09:10 AM

May 03, 2016

The Document Foundation Planet

Gülşah Köse: LibreOffice Hackfest Ankara, Turkey 2016

LibreOffice Hackfest Ankara was held for the first time in Turkey between on 29th April and 1st May sponsored by TUBITAK (Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey). Michael Meeks, Markus Mohrhard and Jan-Marek Glogowski came to Ankara, Turkey for sharing their knowledge with us about LibreOffice. 20~ people attended the event.

29th April:
  • Met with each other.
  • Michael and Markus made presentations about following topics
    • Solving arbitrary problems from a standing start - Real word engineering
    • LibreOffice code structure
    • LibreOffice core classes
    •  Automated testing
    •  Calc & Chart2
    •  ODF and OOXML in LibreOffice
    •  Data for LibreOffice developers
30th April and 1th May:
  • Coding and coding :)
 Hackfest was so beneficial for all attendees. We can get help from irc and mailing list but being together accelerated all of us. Michael, Markus and Jan were very friendly and helpful developers so we left hackfest very happy. We are going to go on contributing and spreading LibreOffice in Turkey.

Finally i want to say that time is the most precious thing we have so thanks to Michael, Markus and Jan for spearing time to us and many thanks to TUBITAK for sponsorship.

 And some photos \o/















by Gülşah Köse (noreply@blogger.com) at May 03, 2016 10:17 PM

Google News

Førsteamanuensis/ høgskulelektor i musikk - Ballade.no


Førsteamanuensis/ høgskulelektor i musikk
Ballade.no
Det er søkjar sitt ansvar å sørge for at alle dokument/filer er lasta opp innan søknadsfristen. Vedlegg skal lastast opp som separate filer i eit format som kan leggjast ved elektronisk; PDF, PMG, JPEG, ODF, DOC. Dersom vedlegga samla overstig 15 MB ...

May 03, 2016 07:44 AM

April 29, 2016

Google News

Administration numérique : officialisation de la nouvelle version du référentiel général d'interopérabilité - Localtis.info


Administration numérique : officialisation de la nouvelle version du référentiel général d'interopérabilité
Localtis.info
Enfin, côté bureautique, l'Open Document Format (ODF) est passé du statut de standard "en observation" à celui de standard "recommandé". Ce qui signifie que pour leurs nouveaux projets ou le choix de leurs nouvelles applications, les administrations ...

April 29, 2016 05:47 PM

Open365: Die kostenlose Office-365-Alternative - COMPUTER BILD


COMPUTER BILD

Open365: Die kostenlose Office-365-Alternative
COMPUTER BILD
Dokumente lassen sich wie beim herkömmlichen Libre Office im Open Document Format (ODF) und auch als Microsoft-Dateien speichern. Ein Synchronisierungsprogramm für Geräte steht für Windows, Mac OS X, Linux und Android bereit. Die Variante für ...

April 29, 2016 06:37 AM

April 27, 2016

Google News

Sénat : un amendement réintroduit une disposition visant à promouvoir le logiciel libre et les formats ouverts, au sein ... - Developpez.com


Sénat : un amendement réintroduit une disposition visant à promouvoir le logiciel libre et les formats ouverts, au sein ...
Developpez.com
Dans sa nouvelle version, l'un des changements notables est que le format Open Document (ODF) est devenu le seul format recommandé par l'État pour échanger des documents bureautiques révisables au sein des administrations. En ce qui concerne le ...

and more »

April 27, 2016 12:48 PM

April 26, 2016

Slashdot

Open365 Is An Open Source Alternative to Microsoft Office 365

Martin Brinkmann, writing for Ghacks: Open365 is an open source Office 365 alternative that allows you to edit or create documents online, and to sync files with the cloud. The service is in beta currently but you can sign up for it already on the official website. You may use it using a web browser, download clients for Windows, Mac or Linux desktop machines, or for Android. An iOS client is in the making currently and will be made available as well soon. Open 365 offers two main features that you can make use of. First, it enables you to synchronize files between devices you use and the cloud. Second, it allows you to view, edit and create documents in the cloud using the technology provided by the Open Source Office suite LibreOffice Online for that.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

by manishs at April 26, 2016 04:30 PM

Google News

France : le format ODF recommandé par l'État pour les documents bureautiques révisables - Developpez.com


France : le format ODF recommandé par l'État pour les documents bureautiques révisables
Developpez.com
Parmi les changements notables dans cette nouvelle version par rapport à la version 1 de 2009, le format Open Document (ODF) devient le seul format recommandé pour échanger des documents bureautiques révisables. Ce statut signifie que le format de ...
Le RGI favorise le format ODFTooLinux
Formats de fichier interopérable : ce qui change avec le RGI 2.0ZDNet France
Le décret d'application du RGIv2 est sortiInformatiqueNews

all 6 news articles »

April 26, 2016 10:01 AM

April 25, 2016

Google News

Bureautique: le format ODF recommandé dans les administrations - ZDNet France


Bureautique: le format ODF recommandé dans les administrations
ZDNet France
Et l'association libriste s'en félicite: la nouvelle version [PDF] "recommande le format ODF pour les documents bureautiques au sein des administrations. Et elle énonce des critiques argumentées sur le format OOXML de Microsoft. L'April salue le ...
France : le format ODF recommandé par l'État pour les documents bureautiques révisablesDeveloppez.com
Le RGI favorise le format ODFTooLinux
Le décret d'application du RGIv2 est sortiInformatiqueNews

all 6 news articles »

April 25, 2016 08:34 PM

Slashdot

Mozilla Seeks New Home For Email Client Thunderbird

Reader chefmonkey writes: In a report commissioned by Mozilla to explore the next home for Thunderbird, two potential new hosts have been offered: the Software Freedom Conservancy (host to git, boost, QEMU, and a host of other projects) and The Document Foundation (home of LibreOffice). At the same time, the report discusses completely uncoupling Thunderbird from the rest of the Mozilla codebase and bringing in a dedicated technical architect to chart the software's roadmap. Given that the two named organizations are already on board with taking Thunderbird under their wing, is this a new lease on life for the email program Mozilla put out to pasture four years ago?In December last year, Mozilla Foundation chairperson Mitchell Baker had argued that the organization should disentangle itself from the Thunderbird email client in order to focus on Firefox. It appears the Firefox-maker is all set to part ways with Thunderbird.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

by manishs at April 25, 2016 08:30 PM

HackerNews

April 24, 2016

Google News

Le RGI favorise le format ODF - TooLinux


Le RGI favorise le format ODF
TooLinux
Cette version du RGI, contrairement à la première, prend parti en faveur de l'open-source en favorisant et recommandant l'usage du format ODF au détriment du format OpenXML de Microsoft, qui lui est « en observation ». Le RGI évolue puisque que dans sa ...
Bureautique: le format ODF recommandé dans les administrationsZDNet France

all 3 news articles »

April 24, 2016 10:26 PM

April 23, 2016

The Document Foundation Planet

Charles Schulz: The importance of the Document Liberation Project

Today I would like to focus on a quite interesting project, even though it is rarely spoken of: The Document Liberation Project. The Document Liberation Project is LibreOffice’s sister project and is hosted inside the Document Foundation; it keeps its own distinct goals and ecosystem however. We often think of it as being overly technical to explain, as the project does not provide binaries everyone may download and install on a computer. Let’s describe in a few words what it does. The Document Liberation project aims at developing filters handling various file formats. The output of the project is then reused inside LibreOffice as well as in other Free Software such as (but not limited to) Inkscape, Abiword, etc.Docliberation

Many people have files and documents that are sitting somewhere on their hard drives and that were first generated by an ancient office suite, word processor or spreadsheet application. Most of these file formats were never publicly documented. As a result, people experience vendor lock-in as they are unable to convert them in a stable, supported and open file format they can actually use. In order to solve this conundrum the Document Liberation project has a set of export filters that convert files to ODF, epub and even Abiword format. Its crownjewel, so to speak, is the set of import filters it has been collecting over the years and that it has improved. Those filters range from MS Publisher files to Clarisworks and Apple Keynote and also have many rarely used file formats. Let’s take a look at the list mentioned on the project’s website:

libwpd
Corel WordPerfect import library.
libwpg
Corel WordPerfect Graphics import library.
libwps
Microsoft Works import library.
libmwaw
A library for import of many legacy Mac document formats.
libabw
AbiWord import library.
libcdr
Corel Draw import library.
libmspub
Microsoft Publisher import library.
libvisio
Microsoft Visio import library.
libetonyek
Apple Keynote/Pages/Numbers import library.
libfreehand
Aldus/Macromedia/Adobe FreeHand import library.
libe-book
A library for import of many e-book formats.
libpagemaker
Adobe PageMaker import library.

This list is impressive and keeps growing. One may also notice the usefulness of the project for digital artists and designers. You can help the project in three ways:
* help developing these filters and libraries
* help documenting the formats the project tries to manage
* submit test documents and assess how effective the filters are in real life.

You may of course donate to the Document Foundation as well. The Document Liberation project matters a lot. It matters for many different people and for the ecosystem of desktop software relying on these files, from office suites to graphical design tool and document processors. If you feel like you could help, do not hesitate one bit, your contribution will be much appreciated and you will help liberating the world, one document at a time.

April 23, 2016 01:46 PM

April 22, 2016

Google News

Le RGI v2 officialisé, ODF préféré à OpenXML - Silicon


Silicon

Le RGI v2 officialisé, ODF préféré à OpenXML
Silicon
Malgré ces antécédents, le référentiel v2 prend clairement parti, privilégiant le format bureautique ODF, issu de la suite OpenOffice, sur le format OpenXML de Microsoft. Certes, ce dernier n'est pas totalement absent de ce référentiel de ...

and more »

April 22, 2016 02:36 PM

April 19, 2016

Google News

What is the Future for Document Creation? - CIOReview


CIOReview

What is the Future for Document Creation?
CIOReview
It's hard to see something replacing Word even with initiatives such as the Open Document Format (ODF) supported by the UK Government. However, the whole point of a Black Swan event is that it comes out of left field and is extremely difficult to predict.

April 19, 2016 01:41 PM

April 18, 2016

EC Joinup

South Tyrol makes U-turn, drops LibreOffice project

Switches to proprietary cloud-based office service

The government of Italy's South Tyrol province will end its LibreOffice migration project, and instead intends to switch to a proprietary cloud-based office service. A decision was published on 12 April.

read more

by Gijs Hillenius at April 18, 2016 06:28 AM

April 15, 2016

ODF Wikipedia Page

74.192.133.56: Updated link

Updated link

← Previous revision Revision as of 17:21, 15 April 2016
Line 159: Line 159:
 
* [[Calligra Suite]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.calligra-suite.org/words/ |title=Words |publisher=Calligra Suite |date= |accessdate=23 February 2012}}</ref>
 
* [[Calligra Suite]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.calligra-suite.org/words/ |title=Words |publisher=Calligra Suite |date= |accessdate=23 February 2012}}</ref>
 
* [[Corel Corporation|Corel]] [[Corel WordPerfect Office|WordPerfect Office X6]]<ref>{{cite web
 
* [[Corel Corporation|Corel]] [[Corel WordPerfect Office|WordPerfect Office X6]]<ref>{{cite web
|url=http://www.corel.com/corel/pages/index.jsp?pgid=12100162
+
|url=http://www.wordperfect.com/us/pages/12100162.html
 
|title=Corel WordPerfect Office X4 - Standard Edition - Compatible
 
|title=Corel WordPerfect Office X4 - Standard Edition - Compatible
 
|accessdate=3 May 2008}}</ref>
 
|accessdate=3 May 2008}}</ref>

by 74.192.133.56 at April 15, 2016 05:21 PM

April 14, 2016

The Document Foundation Planet

Miklos Vajna: OOXML signature export in LibreOffice

After adding support for reading OOXML signatures in LibreOffice, I continued with implementing OOXML signature export (as in: not only verification, but signing).

By verification, I mean that I count the signature of the input document, then compare it with an existing signature, and if they match, it is verified. This can be also called "import", as I only read an existing signature, I don’t create one. By signing, I mean the creation of a new signature, which is always good — if it isn’t, that’s a programming error. This can be also called "export", as I write the new signature into the document.

First, thanks to the Dutch Ministry of Defense who made this work possible (as part of a project implementing trusted signing and communication in LibreOffice), this included:

  • signing a previously unsigned document

  • appending a signature to an already signed document

  • removing a signature from a document with multiple signatures

  • removing the last signature of a signed document, turning it into an unsigned one

Obviously the hardest part was the initial success: signing a previously unsigned document, in a way that is accepted by both LibreOffice and MSO. One trick here is that while in ODF the signature stream is simply added to an existing document storage, in OOXML the storage has to refer to the signature sub-storage (it’s not a stream, as it has a stream for each individual signature), then it has to be signed, and finally the signature can be added to the document storage. So instead of reading the document, then appending the signature, here we need to modify the document, and then we can append the signature. By referring the signature sub-storage, I mean it is necessary to modify [Content_Types].xml (so it contains a mime type for both the .sigs extension, and also for the individual /_xmlsignatures/sigN.xml streams) and also the _rels/.rels stream has to refer _xmlsignatures/origin.sigs, which will contain the list of actual signatures. A surprising detail is that the signature is required to contain quite some software and hardware details about your environment, like monitor resolution, Windows version and so on. For a cross-platform project like LibreOffice this isn’t meaningful, not to mention we have no interest in leaking such information. So what I did instead is writing hardcoded values based on what my test environment would produce, just to please MSO. ;-)

After the initial OOXML signature exporter was ready, the next challenge was adding multiple signatures. The problem here is that you have to roundtrip the existing signatures perfectly. And when I write perfectly, I really mean it: if a single character is written differently, then the hash of the signature will be different, so the roundtrip (when we write back an existing and a new signature to the document) will invalidate the signature. And there is no way around that: the very point of the signature is that only the original signer can re-calculate the signature hash. :-) So what we do is simply threating the existing signatures as a byte array, and when writing back, then we don’t try to re-construct the signature stream based on the xmlsecurity data model, but simply write back the byte array. This way it’s enough to extract parts of the signature which are presented to the user (date, certificate, comment), and we don’t need to parse the rest.

Removing one of multiple existing signatures isn’t particularly hard, you just need to update _xmlsignatures/_rels/origin.sigs.rels and [Content_Types].xml which refer each and every signature stream. It’s a good idea to truncate them before writing, otherwise you may get a not even well-formed XML as a result.

Finally removing the last signature is a matter of undoing all changes we did while adding the first signature (the content type list and the toplevel relation list), finally removing the signature sub-storage all-together. I also factored out all this signature management code from DigitalSignaturesDialog (which is a graphical dialog) to DocumentSignatureManager, so that all the above mentioned features can be unit-tested.

Putting all of these together, LO can now do all signature add, append, remove and clean operations a user would expect from what is referred as simply OOXML signature support. As usual, you can try this right now with a 5.2 daily build. :-)

April 14, 2016 06:20 AM

March 31, 2016

The Document Foundation Planet

Miklos Vajna: OOXML signature import in LibreOffice

(via ascertia)

After adding support for SHA-256 hashes in LibreOffice, I turned towards implementing OOXML signature import (as in: verification, not signing) in LibreOffice. First, thanks to the Dutch Ministry of Defense who made this work possible (as part of a project implementing trusted signing and communication in LibreOffice), I collected a list of building blocks needed for this to work:

  • support for the Relationships Transform Algorithm (described in ISO/IEC 29500-2:2012) in xmlsec

  • an actual XML parser for the OOXML signature in xmlsecurity/

  • a new filter flag, so that our code no longer assumes "is ODF" means "supports digital signing" and

  • some refactoring in xmlsecurity/, so that our digital signature code doesn’t assume that multiple signatures are always written to a single file

The xmlsec bits are now upstream, it seems to me that new algorithm is needed, so that MSO can avoid signing a number of streams (files in ZIP containers), while still being able to verify that all normal streams are signed. Given that MSO by default doesn’t sign all streams (so that e.g. the metadata of the document can be modified without invalidating signatures), this is in use even for a hello-world document. This implies that a typical OOXML signature will never gain the best "signed" category in LO, as we’ll always warn that even though the signature is valid, not all streams are signed. This is a bit of a rant, but better not hide the reality: a default ODF signature covers more than a default OOXML signature.

The OOXML signature parser had to extract all information from the signature markup that’s interesting for LibreOffice, like the certificate, the signature date or the signature description. I considered extending the ODF signature parser instead of implementing a new one for OOXML, since both markups are based on the same W3C signing spec, but they are different enough that the added complexity doesn’t outweigh the benefit of code sharing here.

The next step was to add a new SUPPORTSSIGNING filter flag in filter/, and mark the DOCX, XLSX and PPTX file filters as such, and then of course find places mostly in sfx2/ and xmlsecurity/ that assume only ODF files can be signed, and modifying those checks to also handle this new flag.

Finally, a difference between ODF and OOXML signatures is that ODF puts all of them in a single stream, and all the signing and verifying code works with that stream. However, in case of OOXML, all signatures are in separate streams, so if we want to work with a single object as kind of a signature context, we need a storage (a sub-directory inside the ZIP container), and work with that.

Putting all of these together, we now have unit tests that take test documents having "good" and "bad" signatures, and the verification result in LO will match with the one of MSO. As usual, you can try this right now with a 5.2 daily build. :-)

March 31, 2016 06:47 AM

March 30, 2016

Planet KDE

Testing ODF on Document Freedom Day

Today is Document Freedom Day, the day in the year on which we pay extra attention to open standards.

Document Freedom Day

Document Freedom Day

Because OpenDocument Format (ODF) is the open standard that I am involved in most, I want to write a few words about it.

Since last autumn, I'm working on the ODF standard for the Dutch government. Supporting standards in government is an important task: new software comes and goes, but documents, once created, should be readable and reusable into the future.

Standards for Freedom

Standards help with freedom. If the standard is open, users can choose the software they prefer. The standard helps to create competition on the market.

That is why it is important to have a good standard and software that adheres to it.

It is the latter part, the 'adhering to' that I've given attention to lately. The promise of a standard is to have a common understanding of what the contents of a file mean. Users of ODF should be able to check how well ODF software follows the standard.

ODF Test Server

To find this out, a new project was started last fall: ODF Test Server. This is a web site, currently in development, where anyone can join and add test cases. The tests are then run automatically and results for all ODF software are updated immediately.

The site will cross-link the test files with the ODF standard and show what software covers which part of the standard.

Working on this site has been a lot of fun and a great learning experience. Ingredients from previous projects are coming together nicely to form this new site.

Building on previous work

The main ingredient is ODF AutoTests. ODF AutoTests is an offline version of the site that we are developing now. At the last ODF Plugfest, we evaluated hundreds of tests and wrote a report on them (scroll down for the numbers).

The testing site will improve on the ODF AutoTests. The tests can be evaluated online and only positively evaluated tests will show up in the results. The site will keep track of progress on fixes to the issues that are found.

If you want to join the fun, that's possible of course. The source code is available. It is written in Haskell (server) and Java (client). (Writing a web server in Haskell is a real joy.)

Finally, I'd like to thank NLNet and Logius for making this ODF testing website possible.

by Jos van den Oever (vandenoever) at March 30, 2016 12:00 AM

March 29, 2016

Google News

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: Designing with LibreOffice

front-cover-web-200x300Bruce Byfield, a journalist who specializes in writing about free and open source software, has recently released Designing with LibreOffice, a book about our beloved free office suite, which is not the usual death march through the menu and standard tasks. Instead, the book takes two fresh approaches to the world’s most popular free office suite.

First, it explains the importance of using styles and templates in order to use LibreOffice with the most convenience and the least effort. Second, it explains the basics of modern design and how to apply them in LibreOffice, expanding on the open secret that LibreOffice is as much a desktop publishing application as an office suite.

The result of these approaches is a unique overview of using LibreOffice. If you are a new user, the book will help you get up to speed with LibreOffice. If you have already used LibreOffice, then this book will leave you with a clearer overview of the program and its capabilities.

Designing with LibreOffice has been published by Friends of OpenDocument under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Readers do not need to ask for permission to copy, share, or re-use the contents of Designing with LibreOffice. However, the publisher would appreciate hearing how and where the material has been re-used.

Designing with LibreOffice has a website, with additional information about the book and the author. Of course, the book can be downloaded from the website, and purchased as a traditional paper book from the the Friends of OpenDocument store on Lulu.

March 29, 2016 11:35 AM

March 25, 2016

Slashdot

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Final Beta Released

prisoninmate writes: Canonical pushed the first-ever public Beta ISO images of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), which the company calls "Final Beta" builds, and it looks like they ship with Linux kernel 4.4.6 LTS, the ability to move the Unity Launcher to the bottom of the screen, though, the option remains hidden, for now, the LibreOffice 5.1.1 office suite, GNOME Software as the default package manager, and GNOME Calendar as default calendar app, which supports Google Calendars as well. Official flavors like Ubuntu Studio, Kubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu GNOME, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, and Unbuntu Kylin had also participate in the Beta 2 release. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and its official flavors are currently scheduled for release on April 21, 2016. (Xenial is kind of a cool word, too.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

by timothy at March 25, 2016 02:42 PM

March 24, 2016

Google News

Google Sheets And Slides Updated, More File Formats Supported And Other Changes [APK Download] - Android Police


Android Police

Google Sheets And Slides Updated, More File Formats Supported And Other Changes [APK Download]
Android Police
When I saw this post, that was my first thought too: They're finally adding open document format support! But alas, nope. Considering that ODF is an open standard, they really should support it, given their nature to be friendly towards open-source ...

and more »

March 24, 2016 09:37 PM

March 23, 2016

EC Joinup

Nantes Métropole completes switch to LibreOffice

Will invest EUR 200,000 in improvements and new features

In April, Nantes Métropole, France’s 6th largest city, will complete its transition to LibreOffice, a free and open source suite of office productivity tools. The city has budgeted EUR 200,000 for bug fixes and new features, specifying that all improvements are to be submitted for inclusion in the LibreOffice project.

read more

by Gijs Hillenius at March 23, 2016 03:49 PM

Google News

Нели Крус влезе в борда на директорите на Salesforce - Tech News


Tech News

Нели Крус влезе в борда на директорите на Salesforce
Tech News
Две години по-късно Нели Крус подкрепи предложението Open Document Format (ODF) да стане стандарт за обмен на документи между правителствата на Европа. Крус също така беше отявлен противник на Microsoft. През 2004 г.

March 23, 2016 12:50 PM

The Document Foundation Planet

Miklos Vajna: SHA-256 hashes for ODF signatures in LibreOffice

As it happened with MD5 hashes in the past, the world is currently moving from SHA1 hashes to SHA-256 hashes these days. This affects LibreOffice’s ODF signing feature as well, where we previously wrote and read SHA-1 hashes, but not SHA-256 ones. First, thanks to the Dutch Ministry of Defense who made this work possible (as part of a project implementing trusted signing and communication in LibreOffice), I could start work on tdf#76142 which attached a reproducer document as well, helping the implementation of this feature.

If you’re not into the digital signature details, SHA-256 is relevant in two aspects here:

  • it can be a signature method, denoted by the http://www.w3.org/2001/04/xmldsig-more#rsa-sha256 URI, and

  • it can be a digest method, denoted by the http://www.w3.org/2001/04/xmlenc#sha256 URI

Hashing is interesting in the context of digital signatures because typically not the whole document is signed, just a hash of it, and crypto frameworks like nss or mscrypto typically tie these two together, so you just say you sign with rsa-sha256, which in more detail means hashing with SHA-256 and then signing using rsa.

A valid signed document using SHA-256 hashing looked like this before:

I.e. we failed to validate the signature, and presented a dialog that suggested the signature is not valid. After my changes, it looks like this:

I.e. no error on loading, and the status bar icon tells the user that everything is fine, except that we can’t validate the certificate used for signing.

As for when should LibreOffice start writing (not reading) SHA-256 hashes when creating signatures, it’s an open question. Probably best to wait till most users already have a version that can read those hashes. Then we would still keep support for reading SHA-1 hashes, but we would use SHA-256 when creating new signatures.

Another detail is that the hard work of signing in LibreOffice is done by using libxmlsec. We bundled a heavily patched version from 2009, and it wasn’t clear how much work it is to port our patches to a newer upstream version, so I’ve initially backported the SHA-256 patches to our older version (for the nss and mscrypto backends of libxmlsec, as that covers what LibreOffice uses on Linux, Windows and OS X). At the end I managed to update our bundled libxmlsec to a newer (even if not the newest yet) version, so latest master got rid of those custom backports. As usual, you can try this right now with a 5.2 daily build. :-)

March 23, 2016 08:37 AM

March 22, 2016

Google News

Экс-еврокомиссар и адепт открытого ПО войдет в совет директоров Salesforce - CNews.ru


CNews.ru

Экс-еврокомиссар и адепт открытого ПО войдет в совет директоров Salesforce
CNews.ru
Двумя годами позже она позитивно отреагировала на предложение сделать Open Document Format (ODF) стандартом для обмена документами внутри госучреждений Европы. Противостояние с Microsoft. Крус также была «лицом номер один» в ...

March 22, 2016 05:41 PM

The Document Foundation Planet

Jean Hollis Weber: New book: Designing with LibreOffice

Designing with LibreOfficeBruce Byfield’s much-anticipated book, Designing with LibreOffice has been published by Friends of OpenDocument, Inc. Read about it here or jump straight to the download/buy page to get a free PDF or buy a printed copy.

Carla Schroder, Author of The Linux Cookbook, The Linux Network Cookbook, and The Book of Audacity, says this about the book:

“Designing With LibreOffice” teaches everything you need to know about document production: chapters, footnotes, citations, indexes, outlines, cross-references, incorporating images and spreadsheets, and controlling the appearance of your documents. It is well-organized and contains abundant examples, and is suitable for beginners to wizened old pros, who will probably discover things about LibreOffice that they didn’t know.

March 22, 2016 01:18 AM

March 21, 2016

The Document Foundation Planet

LibreOffice Documentation: Getting Started with LibreOffice 5.0 published

The Documentation Team has published Getting Started with LibreOffice 5.0. Free PDFs can be downloaded from The Document Foundation’s wiki. Printed copies can be purchased here. (Published by Friends of OpenDocument Inc.)

March 21, 2016 09:05 PM

EC Joinup

Dortmund levels playing field for open source

City now accepts documents in Open Document Format

The city of Dortmund (Germany) is levelling the playing field for open source software solutions. The city in January stated that it accepts electronic documents in the Open Document Format (ODF). Do-FOSS, a free and open source software advocacy group in the city, welcomed the “landmark decision”.

read more

by Gijs Hillenius at March 21, 2016 11:06 AM

Slashdot

Meet UbuntuBSD, UNIX For Human Beings

prisoninmate writes: What's ubuntuBSD? Well, it's not that hard to figure out yourself, but just in case you're not sure, we can tell you that ubuntuBSD promises to bring the power of the FreeBSD kernel to Ubuntu Linux. The best part of using the FreeBSD kernel is that you'll end up using the famous Z File System, or ZFS. Xfce is also included along with the popular Firefox, LibreOffice, and Ubuntu Software Center apps. ubuntuBSD is inspired by the Debian GNU/kFreeBSD project, it is hosted on SourceForge, and has been created by Jon Boden.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

by timothy at March 21, 2016 03:24 AM

March 16, 2016

ODF Wikipedia Page

Finell: /* Accessibility */ Delete unsourced content challenged since December 2012

Accessibility: Delete unsourced content challenged since December 2012

← Previous revision Revision as of 23:12, 16 March 2016
Line 191: Line 191:
 
===Accessibility===
 
===Accessibility===
 
{{Further|OpenDocument software#Accessibility}}
 
{{Further|OpenDocument software#Accessibility}}
 
The [[specification]] of OpenDocument has undergone an accessibility review, and a few additions were made to version 1.1 of the specification to improve accessibility. Many of the components it is built on, such as [[Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language]] and [[Scalable Vector Graphics]], have already gone through the [[World Wide Web Consortium]]'s [[Web Accessibility Initiative]] processes.{{citation needed|date=December 2012}}
 
   
 
==Licensing==
 
==Licensing==

by Finell at March 16, 2016 11:12 PM

DocXpresso

More about Docxpresso - Open Source Content Management

Based on Open Standards

No black boxes no user lock in

Although Docxpresso is not free software (only our WordPress and DRUPAL plugins will fall under such categories) it is Open in the sense that is based on Open Standards (ODF, HTML5+CSS) and all the code is open and fully documented so, if needed, can be modified to fully adapt to your needs.

Web interface and developer's API

Catering from developers to endusers

Wether you want to offer a service to your end users or you want to generate a dynamical document out of your data and template repository, Docxpresso offer you the right user interface ranging from an easy to use web (desktop and mobile) interface to an API for agile development. But rest assured that the out of the box functionality of Docxpresso will be enough for your standard needs!!

Integrated data exchange schemas

Import and export data into and from your interactive documents

Docxpresso is architectured as a service so to fully exploit its potential it integrates different ways to import and export data from external databases in a secure enviroment. You may use Docxpresso as a documentation hub for different user enviroments and interfaces by exchanging in and out data from your databases in a completely transparent way for your endusers and employees.

by admin at March 16, 2016 01:39 PM

The Document Foundation Planet

Miklos Vajna: Signature descriptions in LibreOffice

LibreOffice’s user interface prohibited creating multiple signatures by the same author on a document, because there was no semantic meaning of signing the same document multiple times. I’ve recently extended the user interface to be able to provide a signature description: this way it makes sense to allow multiple signatures from the same author, because now each signature can have a different meaning. First, thanks to the Dutch Ministry of Defense who made this work possible.

When the user selects File → Digital Signatures, the dialog lists existing signatures together with their description (if they have any):

When the user clicks on the Sign Document button, the dialog for certificate selection now also asks for an optional description:

Changing the value of the description invalidates the signature. For this feature to work, I have extended LibreOffice’s ODF signature markup to store not only a <dc:date> element as signature metadata, but also the <dc:description>. Given that the metadata of an ODF signature is not part of the ODF specification, it is allowed to extend the metadata with custom child elements, so it was not necessary to submit an ODF enhancement proposal for this file format change at this stage. As usual the commits are in master, so you can try this right now with a 5.2 daily build. :-)

March 16, 2016 08:13 AM

March 07, 2016

Google News

ownCloud 4 improves ease of use, enhances flexibility for end users - CTR (blog)


ownCloud 4 improves ease of use, enhances flexibility for end users
CTR (blog)
The latest version, updated from ownCloud 3 released January 30, also enables users to view Open Document Format (ODF used by LibreOffice, Apache OpenOffice and others) files – quickly and easily without having to download them – something only ...

March 07, 2016 08:28 AM

Nuovo Cad, occasione persa: passi indietro sul software libero - CorCom


CorCom

Nuovo Cad, occasione persa: passi indietro sul software libero
CorCom
Proprio nel momento in cui si poteva fare una scelta a favore dell'openness seguendo l'esempio del Regno Unito che ha adottato il formato aperto ODF (Open Document Format) per tutti i documenti della PA. Proprio nel momento in cui si poteva prendere ...

March 07, 2016 06:09 AM

March 03, 2016

Google News

Unesp adota calendário para adoção completa de softwares livres - Portal Nacional de Seguros


Unesp adota calendário para adoção completa de softwares livres
Portal Nacional de Seguros
E até 1º de agosto, todos os documentos veiculados nos sites da Unesp deverão estar no padrão ODF (OpenDocument Format). O calendário de implantação de programas e adoção completa do formato foi aprovado em reunião ordinária do Conselho ...

March 03, 2016 05:45 PM

February 17, 2016

ODF Wikipedia Page

Lonaowna: /* Software */

Software

← Previous revision Revision as of 14:03, 17 February 2016
Line 170: Line 170:
 
* [[LibreOffice]]<ref name="register" />
 
* [[LibreOffice]]<ref name="register" />
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2003]] and [[Microsoft Office XP|Office XP]] (with the Open Source OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://odf-converter.sourceforge.net/download.html#hRequirements|title=OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-ins for Office|accessdate={{Date|2014-01-31}}}}</ref>
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2003]] and [[Microsoft Office XP|Office XP]] (with the Open Source OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://odf-converter.sourceforge.net/download.html#hRequirements|title=OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-ins for Office|accessdate={{Date|2014-01-31}}}}</ref>
* [[Microsoft Office 2007]] (from service pack 2 release) supports ODF 1.1<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/press/2008/may08/05-21ExpandedFormatsPR.mspx|title=Microsoft Expands List of Formats Supported in Microsoft Office|publisher=Microsoft Corporation|date=21 May 2008|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> (Windows only)
+
* [[Microsoft Office 2007]] (with Service Pack 2 or 3) supports ODF 1.1<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/press/2008/may08/05-21ExpandedFormatsPR.mspx|title=Microsoft Expands List of Formats Supported in Microsoft Office|publisher=Microsoft Corporation|date=21 May 2008|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows only)

by Lonaowna at February 17, 2016 02:03 PM

Lonaowna: /* Software */ add ref for Office 2016 for Mac support

Software: add ref for Office 2016 for Mac support

← Previous revision Revision as of 13:59, 17 February 2016
Line 173: Line 173:
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows only)
* [[Microsoft Office 2016]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows: read/write; OS X: read-only after online conversion)
+
* [[Microsoft Office 2016]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows: read/write; OS X: read-only after online conversion<ref>{{cite web|title=View OpenDocument Format (ODF) files in Office 2016 for Mac|url=https://support.office.com/en-us/article/View-OpenDocument-Format-ODF-files-in-Office-2016-for-Mac-97644726-c089-487c-aac4-07b19fe92cc0|website=Office Support|publisher=Microsoft|accessdate=17 February 2016}}</ref>)
 
* [[Microsoft OneDrive]] / [[Office Web Apps]]<ref>{{cite web|last=Foley |first=Mary Jo |url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-adds-odf-support-url-shortening-to-its-skydrive-storage-service/12480 |title=Microsoft adds ODF support, URL shortening to its SkyDrive storage service |publisher=ZDNet |date=17 April 2012 |accessdate=13 August 2012}}</ref>
 
* [[Microsoft OneDrive]] / [[Office Web Apps]]<ref>{{cite web|last=Foley |first=Mary Jo |url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-adds-odf-support-url-shortening-to-its-skydrive-storage-service/12480 |title=Microsoft adds ODF support, URL shortening to its SkyDrive storage service |publisher=ZDNet |date=17 April 2012 |accessdate=13 August 2012}}</ref>
 
* [[NeoOffice]]
 
* [[NeoOffice]]

by Lonaowna at February 17, 2016 01:59 PM

Lonaowna: /* Software */

Software

← Previous revision Revision as of 13:45, 17 February 2016
Line 173: Line 173:
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows only)
* [[Microsoft Office 2016]] supports ODF (Windows: read/write; OS X: read-only after online conversion)
+
* [[Microsoft Office 2016]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows: read/write; OS X: read-only after online conversion)
 
* [[Microsoft OneDrive]] / [[Office Web Apps]]<ref>{{cite web|last=Foley |first=Mary Jo |url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-adds-odf-support-url-shortening-to-its-skydrive-storage-service/12480 |title=Microsoft adds ODF support, URL shortening to its SkyDrive storage service |publisher=ZDNet |date=17 April 2012 |accessdate=13 August 2012}}</ref>
 
* [[Microsoft OneDrive]] / [[Office Web Apps]]<ref>{{cite web|last=Foley |first=Mary Jo |url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-adds-odf-support-url-shortening-to-its-skydrive-storage-service/12480 |title=Microsoft adds ODF support, URL shortening to its SkyDrive storage service |publisher=ZDNet |date=17 April 2012 |accessdate=13 August 2012}}</ref>
 
* [[NeoOffice]]
 
* [[NeoOffice]]

by Lonaowna at February 17, 2016 01:45 PM

Lonaowna: /* Software */ add Office 2016

Software: add Office 2016

← Previous revision Revision as of 13:43, 17 February 2016
Line 173: Line 173:
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows only)
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows only)
  +
* [[Microsoft Office 2016]] supports ODF (Windows: read/write; OS X: read-only after online conversion)
 
* [[Microsoft OneDrive]] / [[Office Web Apps]]<ref>{{cite web|last=Foley |first=Mary Jo |url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-adds-odf-support-url-shortening-to-its-skydrive-storage-service/12480 |title=Microsoft adds ODF support, URL shortening to its SkyDrive storage service |publisher=ZDNet |date=17 April 2012 |accessdate=13 August 2012}}</ref>
 
* [[Microsoft OneDrive]] / [[Office Web Apps]]<ref>{{cite web|last=Foley |first=Mary Jo |url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-adds-odf-support-url-shortening-to-its-skydrive-storage-service/12480 |title=Microsoft adds ODF support, URL shortening to its SkyDrive storage service |publisher=ZDNet |date=17 April 2012 |accessdate=13 August 2012}}</ref>
 
* [[NeoOffice]]
 
* [[NeoOffice]]

by Lonaowna at February 17, 2016 01:43 PM

EC Joinup

Tallinn schools piloting open source software

Legacy software continues to throw up roadblocks

Schools in the city of Tallinn (Estonia) are gradually moving to PC workstations running on free and open source software. A pilot in March 2014 switched 3 schools and 2 kindergartens. Students, teachers, school administration and kindergartens’ staff members are using LibreOffice, Ubuntu-Linux and other open source tools.

The transition has helped the city to save tens of thousands of EUR in proprietary licence fees.

read more

by Gijs Hillenius at February 17, 2016 01:31 PM

Google News

LibreOffice 5.0.5 soll durch Fehlerkorrekturen Stabilität verbessern - ITespresso.de


LibreOffice 5.0.5 soll durch Fehlerkorrekturen Stabilität verbessern
ITespresso.de
Dazu gehören erweiterte Unterstützung für das Open Document Format (ODF) 1.2, Interoperabilität mit proprietären Dokumentenformaten und die Anbindung von Dokumenten auf entfernten Servern. Eine Liste der wichtigsten Neuerungen findet sich auf der ...

and more »

February 17, 2016 12:46 PM

ODF Wikipedia Page

Viam Ferream: /* Standardization */ common name

Standardization: common name

← Previous revision Revision as of 10:44, 17 February 2016
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{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
 
{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
   
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] the 28th August 2001.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.open-std.org/keld/iso26300-odf/dkuug-std-010828.pdf | title=Meeting agenda for DKUUG STD 2001-08-28 – item 5.6 | accessdate=13 March 2015}}</ref>
+
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the OASIS ([[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]]) industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] the 28th August 2001.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.open-std.org/keld/iso26300-odf/dkuug-std-010828.pdf | title=Meeting agenda for DKUUG STD 2001-08-28 – item 5.6 | accessdate=13 March 2015}}</ref>
   
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=<!--what the title actually says: "ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Information Technology -->Document Description and Processing Languages-->Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 – Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=<!--what the title actually says: "ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Information Technology -->Document Description and Processing Languages-->Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 – Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>

by Viam Ferream at February 17, 2016 10:44 AM

February 16, 2016

ODF Wikipedia Page

Comp.arch: Ndash (snd) is the spaced one (per WP:MOS). E.g. in quote mdash (or even ndash) was actually used: "ISO/IEC 26300:2006/Amd 1:2012 — Open [..]". In some cases "--" was used (or nothing), going with ndash, rather than mdash.

Ndash (snd) is the spaced one (per WP:MOS). E.g. in quote mdash (or even ndash) was actually used: "ISO/IEC 26300:2006/Amd 1:2012 — Open [..]". In some cases "--" was used (or nothing), going with ndash, rather than mdash.

Show changes

by Comp.arch at February 16, 2016 10:16 AM

February 12, 2016

Google News

フリーのオフィス統合環境「LibreOffice」v5.1が公開 - 窓の杜


窓の杜

フリーのオフィス統合環境「LibreOffice」v5.1が公開
窓の杜
従来からあった行の上・列の左へ行や列を挿入するメニューに加え、行の下・列の右へ挿入を行えるメニューが追加されたほか、数式エンジンの改良や“Open Document FormatODF) 1.2”への対応強化などが行われている。 そのほか、他のソフトウェアの独自形式ファイルとの ...

February 12, 2016 10:35 AM

February 11, 2016

Google News

LibreOffice 5.1 verbessert Bedienung und Interoperabilität - ZDNet.de


Heise Newsticker

LibreOffice 5.1 verbessert Bedienung und Interoperabilität
ZDNet.de
Dazu zählt erweiterte Unterstützung für das Open Document Format (ODF) 1.2, Interoperabilität mit proprietären Dokumentenformaten und die Anbindung von Dokumenten auf entfernten Servern. LibreOffice 5.1 (Bild: TDF) Die mit LibreOffice 5.1 aktualisierte ...
LibreOffice 5.1: Update bietet bessere Benutzeroberfläche und InteroperabilitätITespresso.de

all 16 news articles »

February 11, 2016 10:16 AM

LibreOffice 5.1 s'ouvre au stockage dans le cloud - Next INpact


Next INpact

LibreOffice 5.1 s'ouvre au stockage dans le cloud
Next INpact
LibreOffice 5.1 améliore également sa compatibilité avec le format ODF 1.2. Par ailleurs, les modifications effectuées sur le code VBA peuvent être réintégrées dans les documents Office (formats binaire et OOXML), mais avec quelques limitations ...
LibreOffice 5.1 arrive : quelles sont les nouveautés ?Numerama
LibreOffice 5.1, nouvelle version de la suite bureautique gratuite orientée cloudLaptopSpirit.fr
LibreOffice 5.1 est disponibleMac4ever

all 10 news articles »

February 11, 2016 07:51 AM

February 10, 2016

Google News

The best desktop office suite, LibreOffice, gets better - ZDNet


ZDNet

​The best desktop office suite, LibreOffice, gets better
ZDNet
The new LibreOffice also comes with improved document format support. Besides its support for Open Document Format (ODF) 1.2, LibreOffice 5.1 also boasts improved compatibility with Microsoft's Office Open XML (OOXML) format, Microsoft Office's default ...
LibreOffice 5.1 released with redesigned user interfaceInfoWorld
LibreOffice 5.1 reorganizes user interface, reduces start-up timesBetaNews
LibreOffice 5.1: The premier open-source office suite just keeps getting betterPCWorld

all 10 news articles »

February 10, 2016 06:39 PM

LibreOffice 5.1 reorganizes user interface, reduces start-up times - BetaNews


BetaNews

LibreOffice 5.1 reorganizes user interface, reduces start-up times
BetaNews
Also added are powerful search tools for formatted display strings, new mathematical functions and compatibility with Microsoft's OOXML format as well as ODF 1.2. LibreOffice 5.1 also widens interoperability in other areas too, adding filters for Apple ...
LibreOffice 5.1: The premier open-source office suite just keeps getting betterPCWorld
LibreOffice 5.1 Officially Released with Redesigned User Interface, New FeaturesSoftpedia News

all 7 news articles »

February 10, 2016 04:02 PM

LibreOffice 5.1 est disponible - Mac4ever


Mac4ever

LibreOffice 5.1 est disponible
Mac4ever
Digne successeur d'OpenOffice, LibreOffice passe aujourd'hui en version 5.1. La suite bureautique revoit ainsi l'organisation de son interface, améliore la compatibilité avec les programmes de Microsoft et prend désormais en charge le format ODF 1.2.

and more »

February 10, 2016 01:44 PM

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.1

Immediately available for Linux, MacOS X and Windows

wall51smallBerlin, February 10, 2016 – The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.1, a full featured open source office suite which compares head-to-head with every product in the same category, while standing out with superior interoperability features.

LibreOffice 5.1 offers a completely reorganized user interface, and several improved features targeted at enterprise deployments: better support for ODF 1.2, interoperability with proprietary document formats and file management on remote servers.

LibreOffice has been downloaded 120 million times since the launch in January 2011. The office suite is deployed by large organizations in every continent, with …

February 10, 2016 12:01 PM

February 09, 2016

Google News

Gnumeric 1.12.27 Open Source Spreadsheet Editor Has ODF Roundtrip Fixes, More - Softpedia News


Softpedia News

Gnumeric 1.12.27 Open Source Spreadsheet Editor Has ODF Roundtrip Fixes, More
Softpedia News
Noteworthy changes include several OpenDocument Format (ODF) improvements, such as read/write rich-text font-size support and the ability to zoom values to and from ODF files in compatibility with the LibreOffice office suite, as well as support for ...

February 09, 2016 02:51 AM

February 08, 2016

Google News

Dekan ved Avdeling for mediefag - st. nr. 3/2016 - Kampanje


Dekan ved Avdeling for mediefag - st. nr. 3/2016
Kampanje
Vedlegg til søknaden skal lastast opp som separate filer i eit format som kan leggjast ved elektronisk; PDF, PMG, JPEG, ODF, DOC. Dersom vedlegga samla overstig 15 MB, må dei komprimerast før dei vert lasta opp. Vedlegga må ha namn som samsvarar ...

February 08, 2016 08:46 AM

February 03, 2016

Google News

한글 프로그램 없는 PC로도 민원서류 작성한다 - 연합뉴스


한글 프로그램 없는 PC로도 민원서류 작성한다
연합뉴스
특정 워드프로세서가 필요 없는 '개방형 문서표준'(open document format, ODF) 형태로 민원서류를 관리해 국민의 편의를 개선하고 '정보 접근성'을 높이기 위한 조처라고 행자부는 설명했다. 앞서 2014년 옛 안전행정부는 특정 프로그램에 종속되지 않는 ODF 방식 ...

and more »

February 03, 2016 05:51 AM

February 01, 2016

The Document Foundation Planet

Andras Timar: Exporting custom shapes to DrawingML – Part 3

On LibreOffice FOSDEM 2016 Hackfest I continued to work on DrawingML export of custom shapes. (See also Part 1 and Part 2 of this work.)

This time I worked on export of flipped and rotated custom shapes, and I made progress. Check out the screenshots below.

Colorful rotated arrows in an ODF document in LibreOffice Writer

Colorful rotated arrows in an ODF document in LibreOffice Writer

DOCX export of the file opened in Word 2010 before the patch

DOCX export of the file opened in Word 2010 before the patch

DOCX export of the file opened in Word 2010 after the patch

DOCX export of the file opened in Word 2010 after the patch

February 01, 2016 10:26 AM

January 29, 2016

Google News

Microsoft, il sonno della ragione - Tech Economy


Tech Economy

Microsoft, il sonno della ragione
Tech Economy
... eccezione del Governo del Regno Unito – motivo sufficiente per evitare di pensare e prendere una decisione a difesa dei cittadini, ovvero il passaggio al formato ODF (Open Document Format), l'unico standard per i documenti autenticamente standard.

January 29, 2016 09:14 AM

January 26, 2016

Google News

Сделано в России: обзор пакета офисных приложений "МойОфис" - PlayGround.ru


Сделано в России: обзор пакета офисных приложений "МойОфис"
PlayGround.ru
Любопытно, что в ядре российского продукта задействован внутренний формат OpenDocument Format (ODF), в котором программисты «Новых облачных технологий» реализовали объектную модель документа (Document Object Model), более ...

and more »

January 26, 2016 07:48 AM

Сделано в России: обзор пакета офисных приложений «МойОфис» - 3DNews


3DNews

Сделано в России: обзор пакета офисных приложений «МойОфис»
3DNews
Любопытно, что в ядре российского продукта задействован внутренний формат OpenDocument Format (ODF), в котором программисты «Новых облачных технологий» реализовали объектную модель документа (Document Object Model), более ...

and more »

January 26, 2016 05:03 AM

January 25, 2016

Planet KDE

New Year Calligra Words Sprint

When the streets are covered with snow and ice in many parts of Europe, it’s a good time to sit inside in front of our computers and to improve that software we are sharing here with each other.
With the porting of the apps, plugins & libs part of Calligra to Qt5/KF5 roughly done towards the end of 2015, it is now also a good time to work on features again.

Given a few Calligra developers interested in improving the text-handling modules, we looked into doing a developer meeting (a.k.a. “sprint”) on that quickly, and given January being a good candidate for snow and ice on the streets, we scheduled it for the 4th week-end of January, so the one that just passed.
In the end it was just three of us who could make it, but small can be also better :)

A big share of time of the sprint was invested into spreading knowledge about the current text-layout system by its architect Camilla, by explaining and discussing the current design and code.
To apply, test and enhance the learned things about the layout system, we started to draft and to implement support for the concept of text sections (as in OpenDocument Format’s <text:section>) to the system.

While talking about the text-layout system and the data structures, we also looked into the Calligra plugins for the document viewer Okular (learn more about the plugins). We checked and fixed a little the current calculation of the positions of headings for the table of contents. And drafted how to use the layout structure data for the calculation of characters positions on a given page, to finally implement support for text selections and hyperlinks with the plugins.

And with OpenDocument Format engaged people around, we also chatted about ODF-related things a little. E.g. that having a central database where all errors & artifacts injected into ODF files by the known ODF producer software is collected. Because with some N-number of ODF producer software all M-number of ODF consumer software need to each write support for possibly dealing with broken files from all N ODF producer software, and need to know what to care for and how. It might be nice to perhaps just have a single broken-ODF-file-fixup software one could use, so one’s ODF consumer software can simply expect sane ODF files.
While mentioning ODF here: consider visiting Jos’ talks at FOSDEM upcoming week-end, “The Future of OpenDocument (ODF)” and “Eternal Plugfest”.

It happened that due to a date mixup the Krita developer community did a small sprint at the same place at the same time. Which worked out nicely not only for the social parts of the sprint, which we all did together. Also during the working times often we were sitting mixed in the same rooms.
It was also an occasion to learn more about Krita’s OpenGL-based rendering, which could be an inspiration for a new generation of Calligra’s shape rendering system (which I personally am thinking about).

These are the sheets with explanations that I take home with me, next to the digital and mental notes:
WordsSprintJan2016SheetsOnTheDesk

(One day hopefully we finally will do such sketches not on real paper, but on virtual sheets, using Calligra + Krita modules :)) ).

It was a very productive and enjoyable week-end, in a wonderful atmosphere, I am happy we did this meeting.

Thanks a lot to Boudewijn and Irina for being the great hosts to our Calligra Words sprint and for giving us the free accomodation in their home, incl. breakfast, drinks and more, in a family-like way.

This sprint was also enabled by the supporters of KDE e.V., thanks to them to make it financially possible for us Calligra developers to meet up for face2face talking and working.
If you, dear reader, want to do your little contribution to the future of KDE software as well, consider to Join The Game as a supporter of KDE via the KDE e.V. !


by Friedrich Kossebau (frinring) at January 25, 2016 12:54 PM

January 23, 2016

HackerNews

January 21, 2016

Google News

Microsoft's Office 365 Introduces Major new Features for Apple Fans in the Office or on the Go - Patently Apple


Microsoft's Office 365 Introduces Major new Features for Apple Fans in the Office or on the Go
Patently Apple
I personally spent seven years working on the OASIS ODF workgroup, initially there representing the OpenOffice Open Source Community. I promise you, ODF is a format native to OpenOffice. It is not designed for interoperability with Microsoft Office ...

and more »

January 21, 2016 11:00 PM

January 20, 2016

Charles H. Schulz

In Memoriam of John McCreesh & FOSDEM 2016

I was about to write about the main topic of this post, namely FOSDEM 2016 when we learned of the death of someone who was a really nice and gentle human being, John McCreesh. For those who may not know John, it’s important to say that while he was not as famous as Ian Murdock, he was definitely one of the pillars of the OpenOffice.org community for long years. He served as a volunteer there in various capacities, but mostly as one of the marketing project lead. During his tenure, he had to deal with complicated situations and several challenges. John was, I already wrote it, a gentle human being. He managed to help build and strengthen the OpenOffice.org community and make it bloom even when times were dire. He was nice, always listening to others, soothing and comforting people around him. John knew the value of peace and moving forward. His origins (he was born in Northern Ireland if I’m not mistaken and his family origins are quite interesting in that regard) and upbringing made him respect anyone who was coming towards him and his welcoming stance gained him many friends and many open source volunteers. In some cases, his generous and kind attitude helped him make people stay in the project even as they had every obvious reasons to leave.

It is not known that John was one of the key people who helped push the LibreOffice project. He had no desire to appear as a leader, and no more time to contribute as his new involvement in the local government left him little time. We have lost a beautiful and precious being – I could sign this with my Document Foundation hat anytime.

Let’s now get back to the original topic: FOSDEM 2016. I will be there at the LibreOffice booth and I’m quite excited about it. I do not yet know if I will have time to attend all the sessions I have bookmarked but below are a few of them. Hopefully we will meet there?
OpenDocument Editors room: an obvious choice. But there are some really nice sessions there, especially if you want to hear about the Android and cloud versions development.
Desktops room: Converged experience with Ubuntu phone apps. This one is going to be popular I think. Have a seat in advance.
Open Source Design devroom: intriguing. I like that these kind of initiatives exist and such talks can take place at FOSDEM.
Security Devroom: there’s the first session about PCI-DSS testing that could be quite good… let’s see.
Guile track: functional package management with Guix could be quite fun. In fact, Guix is really fun and promising I think.
Distros track: the whole track is a must, I will really try to attend it.
– So is the Office track. Seriously, Michael Meeks will introduce you to LibreOffice Cloud version. Just be there!
Virtualization track: microdatacenter with Raspberry pi and Kubernetes. Waow. Much good. Must go. Nice. Super cool.

I hope to see many of you at FOSDEM!

by Charles at January 20, 2016 09:47 PM

January 19, 2016

Google News

Préférence au logiciel libre dans l'administration : le cadeau bonux de la loi Lemaire - Silicon


Préférence au logiciel libre dans l'administration : le cadeau bonux de la loi Lemaire
Silicon
Le Référentiel général d'interopérabilité (RGI) v2 va ainsi donner la priorité au format bureautique ODF, issu de la suite bureautique Open Source OpenOffice. Au détriment du OpenXML de Microsoft. Rappelons que, dans les années 2000 déjà, les ...

January 19, 2016 08:01 AM

January 18, 2016

Google News

Open source made in Taiwan - Tech Economy


Tech Economy

Open source made in Taiwan
Tech Economy
... may jointly promote the ODF (Open Document Format), as well as participate in the open document standard format of the government in order to enhance our soft power. Therefore, the open document format ODF-CNS15251 featuring high compatibility for ...

January 18, 2016 10:18 AM

January 15, 2016

Planet KDE

The New Laptop

So, some time ago, I was wondering a) what new laptop to get and b) what to do with Krita on OSX. As for the laptop, I felt I wanted something fast, something with at least 16GB of memory and a largish screen. Preferably with a good keyboard. As for OSX, I felt it might not be worth either mine or the Krita Foundation's money to plunk down the serious moolah that Apple is asking for their hardware... After all, how many people fall for Apple's glamourie, in the real world, after all? Especially now that the reality distortion field's progenitor is no longer among us.

Then I did an interview with CGWorld's Jim Thacker, about Krita. He's very much someone from the graphics software world, not the free software world. And he expressed his amazement at my dismassal of Apple. And then my bank account was getting seriously empty, and I had to take a temporary consulting gig to make sure I could continue paying my mortgage. And at the place I'm working now, and in the commuter train I'm travelling on, more than half of the people have Apple laptops.

I don't know why... And I guess they don't know why, either. Well, Windows has always been kind of ugly, especially Windows 7 and 10. Windows 8 I really liked, by the way -- if you have a touch screen, the interaction design is simple, effective and efficient. Everything is consistent, easy and pleasant. The few metro apps I used, I loved. But, well, Apple. Apparently more people than I was able to imagine think getting an Apple laptop is a good idea.

So, all together, I decided to go and get an Apple laptop, too. Let's try to make Krita 3.0's OS X port a first-class citizen! It can only expand our community and make our next fundraiser stronger!

So we got a 15" Macbook Pro Retina. Not the most expensive model, but it was still plenty expensive. More than a thousand cups of coffee. Here's what I think of it, after a month or so.


What follows now is part hardware, part software review. I guess I need to state up-front that while I'm a long-time free software person, I've never been an Apple hater any more than a Microsoft hater. Or lover. I've used or owned three Apple computers before this one.

The first was a Powerbook Pismo I got when Tryllian went broke and the artist department was disbanded. That thing had a great screen, a great keyboard (apart from the missing keys), a great shape and style, ran OS 9 and OS X equally well. I had wanted one of the tiBooks, but they were all broken. The Pismo served me for a long time as a writing machine, as a holiday games, music and photo machine, as a Krita development machine (it dual-booted to Debian). I loved it, and then a clumsy daughter tripped over the power cable, causing it to drop nearly half a meter, onto the floor. It sparked and smoked whenever I applied current to it afterwards, so I discarded it.

Sadness! But when I started working for Hyves, I got a first generation 17" macbook pro. Still a thoroughly respectable keyboard (apart from the missing keys), great screen, really fast. And using an Apple laptop was sort of inevitable, since at Hyves we were developing a cross-platform chat client for the Hyves social network. Hyves was the Dutch Facebook, by the way. It's dead now. So was the Macbook Pro, after a year. After a year in my backpack the screen started developing vertical green, red and blue lines. Actually... It was the second device Hyves got me, the first one was dead on arrival. Still, it had a decent keyboard.

At KO GmbH, one of our less well-considered ventures was to develop a WebODF-based app for the iPad. To that end, we got an iPad and a 2011 Mac Mini. The iPad is still with Jos, but after a while, building Krita for OSX also seemed a good idea, so I got the Mac Mini. It's got a nice amount of memory, 8GB, and the disk is exceedingly roomy, at 1TB. But... The disk is also really slow, and the Krita hack, build, deploy, test, hack again cycle could easily take an hour! Which is the reason I never really did much Krita on OSX hacking since the 2014 kickstarter, when I first ported Krita to OSX.

(The keyboard I use with the Mac Mini, by the way, is more than excellent. It's a WASD custom-built keyboard, and I bought it for using with the Thinkstation desktop machine. It's got a penguin key.)


So, time for the fourth Apple computer. My needs were:

  • Fast
  • Large screen
  • Good keyboard

Two out of three isn't bad... Except for a laptop that costs more than 2000 euros. I got a 15" Macbook Pro with a 256Gb SSD. For only about 500 euros more, I would have had a bigger disk, and the disk on this laptop is already fullish, what with two Linux and one Windows virtual machines and an OSX build tree or two.

So, what's good? The screen is really good, sharp, clear, excellent color, unless you turn the brightness down. It's not as clear and sharp as the Dell XPS 12 screen, but it doesn't have the Dell's ghosting problem. And if you turn the brightness down? The contrast goes down and the colors go down and it looks washed out.

Unfortunately, it isn't a touch screen, which frustrates me, because I have gotten used to direct interaction in the past couple of years. I also don't get the way Apple uses display scaling, but that'll come, no doubt. It seems to me that if you just blow up ever pixel to four pixels the result isn't really sharper, but somehow it is, for text at least.

It's also fast. It builds Krita faster than my desktop workstation, which is really impressive. And useful, because apart from writing mail, handling bugs and irc, building Krita is pretty much what I do. Oh, and a little coding...

For the coding, I need a good keyboard, and that's where this laptop falls down.

The keyboard is ghastly. Honestly. The only reason anyone can think it's adequate is because they are too young to have used really good keyboards on laptops.

Not only does it still miss Home, End, PgUp, PgDn and Delete (the key Apple labels as Delete is Backspace), the keys have next to no travel. Yes, I get it, thin is the new black. But not when it impairs my productivity. The keys are little black squares of sharp-edged plastic with no shape. And they are also sort of wobbly.

As on Thinkpads, Fn and Control are reversed. Which makes the remarks you read now and then from people who've chosen to buy Apple instead of Lenovo because of the Fn key position rather silly.

Because of the lack of Home and End, and because of Apple's confusion about what those keys should do, it gets really tricky to navigate to the start or end of a line, something which anyone who codes does all the time. You need a different key combination in the shell, in vi, in Qt Creator, in TextMate, everywhere! I am a fast touch typist, but I am having to look under my left hand at the block of Fn, Control, Option and Command all the time to hit the right combination. I still cannot switch between the browser and the terminal and remember the shortcut to move to the next or previous tab, they are different! Honestly, I am not making this up.

The other thing that's below par, though probably related to the "really fast" bit, is the battery life. Two hours of coding and building will drain the battery down to about 40%. When building in a Windows VM and in OSX at the same time, the charger seems to have a hard time keeping up. I saw the battery drain while it was plugged in. No, I'm not asking you to believe me, I don't believe myself either.

There are other niggles about the hardware: the laptop gets really hot (again probably related to the "really fast"...), the edges are sharp, the power button is where my little finger expects the delete button. The aluminum case is really prone to scratches, even the plastic zipper of my laptop bag manages it.

But actually, Apple's design is one reason I didn't want to wait another six months for the updated model. Just imagine a Macbook Pro that is remodeled after the Macbook redesign, with keys with all of two-tenths of a milimeter of travel! Better live for a bit with an older processor.

Now for the other part of the deal...

Software

The software. OSX. It's an operating system. Not a particularly brilliant one, but it does run applications. And it's got a gui with a a window manager. A particularly aenemic window manager that needs extensions to tile windows left and right, but that's getting "modernized" by making it more like a tablet. In the El Capitan version, it really, really, really wants you to run your applications full-screen. Okay. It's a bit stupid that from version to version the meaning of the title bar button changes, apparently randomly, too.

What is also quite irritating is the bunch of crap extra applications that take up space and are completely useless to me: safari, garageband, imovie, pages, keynote, itunes and so on. I wonder if I can just trash them...

As a development platform, OSX sucks, too, with limited OpenGL support, huge crippling changes between versions and horrible developer documentation. Oh, and a bunch of proprietary languages and API's that nobody in their right mind would even consider learning, because they are bound to be deprecated just when they get established.

Conclusion

The short version: I still take the Dell XPS 12 with me on the train most days. It's slow, small, the keyboard is lacking, and it's still a more usable computer. If that isn't a damning indictment, I don't know what is.

The slightly longer version: the only valid reason to buy an Apple computer is because you need to write software for OSX or iOS, in other words, to provide the people who didn't have a valid reason to get an Apple with software.

Coda

I bought this laptop from a website with a .nl extension. The website was in Dutch. It's no doubt being maintained by people who live in the Netherlands and pay income tax in the Netherlands. After ordering it, it was manufactured in China, and shipped from Shanghai to Korea, from Korea to Kazachstan, from Kazachstan to Germany, from Germany to the Netherlands. And then to me. I paid VAT in the Netherlands. At no point in the buying of this piece of crap was Ireland involved.

Except that Ireland's where the bill was ostensibly coming from.

Tim, me boy, you sell a crap OS on a crap piece of hardware and you're cheating my country of the tax income it needs, which I and the other Dutch people then need to make up, just so you can sit on a pile of cash big enough to make all of Africa into an affluent continent. If you were a honest dealer, my tax burden would be lower and my laptop would, presumably, be better. And so would the world. Time to think different?

by Boudewijn Rempt (boud) at January 15, 2016 08:54 PM

January 13, 2016

Google News

OneDrive 6.7 prend en charge l'iPad Pro et le format OpenDocument - Next INpact


Sen360

OneDrive 6.7 prend en charge l'iPad Pro et le format OpenDocument
Next INpact
Pour ceux qui manipulent des documents au format OpenDocument (ODF), OneDrive apporte également une bonne nouvelle : la compatibilité permettant de les ouvrir directement dans Word, Excel ou PowerPoint en fonction du type. La reconnaissance du ...
Microsoft met à jour OneDrive pour iOSEre Numérique

all 4 news articles »

January 13, 2016 07:53 AM

January 11, 2016

Microsoft Office blog

What’s new: December 2015

Improvements to Office 365 kept flowing through the holiday season, bringing even more value to Office 365. The new Skype for Business for Android is here! The Power Pivot data model in Excel 2016 got smart rename support and Access 2016 Runtime became available. For business, the popular First Release program added more services, the Office 365 Compliance Center became the Office 365 Protection Center, Office 365 Advanced eDiscovery arrived and the Office 365 Planner preview started rolling out. To help you schedule meetings faster, there’s a new Outlook add-in called FindTime. The big news for developers is the availability on GitHub of Matter Center, an Office 365 Add-in and SharePoint-based document collaboration solution designed to increase productivity for legal professionals.

Leave us a comment to let us know what your favorite new feature is. If you missed last month’s updates, see What’s new: November 2015.

Office 365 Personal, Office 365 Home and Office 365 University updates

Smart rename support in data model for Excel 2016—Now in Excel 2016, when you rename a table, column or DAX measure in the Power Pivot data model, the rename is propagated through the workbook and all affected objects in the workbook. This significantly improves the analyst’s workflow, simplifying the scenarios when you rename a table, column, calculated field, measure or hierarchy in the Power Pivot window.

Access 2016 Runtime available for download—Access 2016 provides a rich platform for developing database management solutions with easy-to-use customization tools. If no end-user customization is required, you can distribute your Access 2016 solutions so they run without a full installation of Access 2016. To do so, you must package and distribute your application with Access 2016 Runtime.

Microsoft Translator brings natural translation to wearables—Now you can speak into your Android and iOS wearables and receive a translation on your phone, which can then be handed to another person, who can continue the dialogue—creating natural, translated conversation. Translation is available for English, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish.

Office Mobile for Windows 10 phone, updates for Apple and Android, Office 365 Planner preview and more—A host of new apps and features arrived this month. Windows 10 phones now ship with Office Mobile. Updates for Office across Apple and Android include OpenDocument support for Mac and iOS, Skype for Business for Android and more. The preview for Office 365 Planner, a new app that helps teams easily organize their work, started rolling out to commercial First Release customers. In addition, new tools were added for IT admins.

Office 365 for Business and Education updates*

Office 365 brings significant new value to businesses worldwide—New Office 365 Enterprise E5 subscription brings communications services—like PSTN conferencing, Skype Meeting Broadcast and PSTN calling—enabling you to modernize your voice, video and meeting experiences while saving substantial costs in your communication infrastructure. Also, new security and analytics capabilities—like Delve Analytics and Customer Lockbox—dramatically improve your ability to protect information and glean insights from data.

Schedule meetings faster with FindTime—Spend less time this year deciding when to meet! Use FindTime, an Outlook add-in, which helps you find the best meeting time fast. FindTime helps you pinpoint times to meet by looking at available free/busy data for your attendees and creates a poll where attendees can vote on the times you suggest or suggest new times. Once you reach consensus, FindTime sends out the meeting invite on your behalf.

3 enhancements to Project Online—Email notifications were improved to help keep you on top of what’s coming, what’s happening and what’s due. You can now generate a unique project ID for each new project, so you can refer to a project independently of the project name. And the limits on all custom field limits for reporting were increased, so you can include more project text custom fields in reports.

New Sway admin controls—To help Office 365 admins better manage the way Sway is used within their organizations, new capabilities were added. Now you can assign access to Sway on an individual or group basis, control which third-party sources are enabled in the Sway Insert tab and see the Sway service status in the Service Health Dashboard in the Office 365 admin center as well as the Office 365 Admin app.

More services join First Release—Office 365 ProPlus and Office 365 Business subscriptions now have First Release builds of the Office client, and SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business added support for the First Release Select People option. Service update communications improvements include a revamped Message Center in the Office 365 Admin Center Preview, push notifications for Message Center posts in the Office 365 Admin app and new filters and tags in the Office 365 for business roadmap.

Office 365 Groups updates—Office 365 Groups now supports eDiscovery, litigation hold and other compliance capabilities. Directory management updates include the addition of dynamic membership, which enables administrators to create groups with rule-based memberships using the Azure Management Portal. Read about these and the enhancements planned for 2016 in compliance and protection, directory management and the administrative experience.

Manage your security and compliance needs with the new Office 365 Protection Center—With the recent launch of Advanced Threat Protection (ATP), Data Loss Prevention (DLP) and Mobile Device Management (MDM), the Office 365 Compliance Center was expanded, redesigned and renamed. It’s now called the “Office 365 Protection Center,” and the new user experience is more intuitive, informative, scalable and insightful. Existing Compliance Center customers will begin transitioning to the Protection Center in early 2016.

Reduce eDiscovery costs and challenges with Office 365 Advanced eDiscovery—Quickly investigate and meet legal obligations. Office 365 Advanced eDiscovery integrates Equivio machine learning, predictive coding and text analytics capabilities to reduce the costs and challenges that come with sorting through large quantities of data for eDiscovery purposes. Office 365 Advanced eDiscovery is part of the new Office 365 Enterprise E5 plan. Learn more and see it in action.

Admins, get ready for Office 365 Planner preview!—The Office 365 Planner preview is rolling out to First Release customers. Office 365 administrators who have opted into First Release will receive an email with instructions for setting up the preview. Once administrators have set it up, users can launch Planner from the Office 365 app launcher. Office 365 Planner offers a simple, visual way to organize teamwork.

Announcing the Office 365 ISO 27001 and ISO 27018 audit assessment report—Independent third-party auditors tested Office 365 against ISO 27001 and ISO 27018 standards, and you can now find the Office 365 ISO 27001 and ISO 27018 audit assessment report in the compliance reports section on the Office 365 Service Trust Portal. The report provides assurance around implementation of an information security management system, controls to protect PII and implementation of an information security risk management program.

OneDrive for Business storage and sync updates—OneDrive for Business unlimited storage is rolling out to Office 365 customers with select Enterprise, Government and Education plans. The rollout of increased storage to these customers is expected to complete by the end of March 2016. The OneDrive for Business Next Generation Sync Client for Windows and for Mac is now available. It delivers improved reliability and performance, plus selective sync, support for files up to 10 GB and more. Check out the improvements to the mobile apps and the new OneDrive for Business API, too.

Skype for Business for Android now available—Highlights of the new Skype for Business app for Android include: a new dashboard design that brings the contact search bar, your upcoming meetings and most recent conversations to one place; a contact search bar that allows you to search your Global Address List by name, email or a phone number; and modern authentication support. You can get the app in the Google Play store. Android users with Lync 2013 will be automatically updated to the app.

Smarter address book and flight confirmations coming to Outlook on the web—New features are coming soon to Outlook on the web to help you get things done faster and avoid common mistakes like forgetting how to spell someone’s name, leaving someone out of a group email or forgetting to add a flight to your calendar. The Events from email feature and the new features that learn from you to help you write emails faster will roll out to commercial First Release customers soon, and broadly by March 2016.

Office 365 developer updates

Monthly Dev Digest—Hack productivity and OneDrive API are the highlights this month. A recent podcast showcases submissions to in-person hackathons. You can register for the new virtual hackathon run over at msoffice365.devpost.com—grand prize of $10,000. OneDrive API is now available for OneDrive, OneDrive for Business and SharePoint Online, with new functionality being added all the time. As always, get the list of new and updated dev documentation, code samples, add-ins, Office Dev podcasts, patterns and practices, blog posts, Office Store news and upcoming events.

Matter Center for Office 365 now available in GitHub—Matter Center is an Office 365 Add-in and SharePoint-based document collaboration solution designed to increase productivity for legal professionals while supporting seamless access from any device. Now available to a broad community of developers through GitHub, Matter Center allows developers to deliver solutions for users in the legal space, demonstrates the capabilities of Office as a solutions platform and offers a compelling model for collaboration with developers and partners.

Please note that some of the updates may take time to show up in your Office 365 account, because they’re being rolled out to customers worldwide.

—Andy O’Donald @andyodonald

——————————————————————————–

*Not all updates apply to every Office 365 plan; please check the individual post for specifics.

The post What’s new: December 2015 appeared first on Office Blogs.

by Office 365 Team at January 11, 2016 05:00 PM

January 07, 2016

ODF Wikipedia Page

Cyberbot II: Rescuing 2 sources, flagging 0 as dead, and archiving 68 sources. #IABot

Rescuing 2 sources, flagging 0 as dead, and archiving 68 sources. #IABot

← Previous revision Revision as of 10:39, 7 January 2016
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{{Main|OpenDocument technical specification}}
 
{{Main|OpenDocument technical specification}}
   
The most common [[filename extension]]s used for OpenDocument documents are:<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html|title=UA.es|work=ua.es|language=es}}{{dead link|date=January 2016}}</ref><ref name="hg flat opendocument">{{cite web |url=http://www.ensode.net/roller/dheffelfinger/entry/openoffice_documents_version_control_with |title=OpenOffice.org Document Version Control With Mercurial |accessdate=7 June 2010}}</ref>
+
The most common [[filename extension]]s used for OpenDocument documents are:<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html |title=UA.es |work=ua.es |language=es |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/20090615185541/http://www.ua.es:80/en/rua/formatos.html |archivedate=15 June 2009 }}</ref><ref name="hg flat opendocument">{{cite web |url=http://www.ensode.net/roller/dheffelfinger/entry/openoffice_documents_version_control_with |title=OpenOffice.org Document Version Control With Mercurial |accessdate=7 June 2010}}</ref>
   
 
* <code>.odt</code> and <code>.fodt</code> for [[word processing]] (text) documents
 
* <code>.odt</code> and <code>.fodt</code> for [[word processing]] (text) documents
Line 183: Line 183:
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
Various organizations have announced development of conversion software (including ''plugins'' and ''filters'') to support OpenDocument on [[Microsoft]]'s products.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20060504015438308 | title=OpenDocument Foundation to MA: We Have a Plugin | date=4 May 2006 | accessdate=23 August 2006 | publisher=Groklaw}}</ref><ref>{{cite news | url=http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Microsoft_Office_to_get_a_dose_of_OpenDocument/0,130061733,139255766,00.htm | title=Microsoft Office to get a dose of OpenDocument | date=5 May 2006 | accessdate=6 December 2006|publisher=CNet}}</ref> {{asof|July 2007}}, there are nine packages of conversion software.<!--Commented out invalid reference <ref name="odf20070727"/>--> Microsoft first released support for the OpenDocument Format in Office 2007 SP2.<ref>{{cite web | title=Office 2007 SP2 Supports ODF | url=http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/164015/office_2007_sp2_supports_odf.html | date=28 April 2009 | publisher=PC World}}</ref> However, the implementation faced [[OpenDocument software#Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 support controversy|substantial criticism]] and the [[ODF Alliance]] and others claimed that the third party plugins provided better support.<ref name="sp2-fact-sheet">{{cite web | url=http://web.archive.org/web/20090611181719/http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf | title=Fact-sheet Microsoft ODF support | accessdate=24 May 2009 | quote=''MS Excel 2007 will process ODF spreadsheet documents when loaded via the Sun Plug-In 3.0 for MS Office or the SourceForge “OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office,” but will fail when using the “built-in” support provided by Office 2007 SP2.'' | publisher=odfalliance}}</ref> Microsoft Office 2010 can open and save OpenDocument Format documents natively, although not all features are supported.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/starter-help/differences-between-the-opendocument-text-odt-format-and-the-word-docx-format-HA010355788.aspx|title=Differences between the OpenDocument Text (.odt) format and the Word (.docx) format|work=office.microsoft.com}}</ref>
+
Various organizations have announced development of conversion software (including ''plugins'' and ''filters'') to support OpenDocument on [[Microsoft]]'s products.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20060504015438308 | title=OpenDocument Foundation to MA: We Have a Plugin | date=4 May 2006 | accessdate=23 August 2006 | publisher=Groklaw}}</ref><ref>{{cite news | url=http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Microsoft_Office_to_get_a_dose_of_OpenDocument/0,130061733,139255766,00.htm | title=Microsoft Office to get a dose of OpenDocument | date=5 May 2006 | accessdate=6 December 2006|publisher=CNet}}</ref> {{asof|July 2007}}, there are nine packages of conversion software.<!--Commented out invalid reference <ref name="odf20070727"/>--> Microsoft first released support for the OpenDocument Format in Office 2007 SP2.<ref>{{cite web | title=Office 2007 SP2 Supports ODF | url=http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/164015/office_2007_sp2_supports_odf.html | date=28 April 2009 | publisher=PC World}}</ref> However, the implementation faced [[OpenDocument software#Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 support controversy|substantial criticism]] and the [[ODF Alliance]] and others claimed that the third party plugins provided better support.<ref name="sp2-fact-sheet">{{cite web|url=http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf |title=Fact-sheet Microsoft ODF support |accessdate=24 May 2009 |quote=''MS Excel 2007 will process ODF spreadsheet documents when loaded via the Sun Plug-In 3.0 for MS Office or the SourceForge “OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office,” but will fail when using the “built-in” support provided by Office 2007 SP2.'' |publisher=odfalliance |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/20090611181719/http://www.odfalliance.org:80/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf |archivedate=11 June 2009 }}</ref> Microsoft Office 2010 can open and save OpenDocument Format documents natively, although not all features are supported.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/starter-help/differences-between-the-opendocument-text-odt-format-and-the-word-docx-format-HA010355788.aspx|title=Differences between the OpenDocument Text (.odt) format and the Word (.docx) format|work=office.microsoft.com}}</ref>
   
 
Starting with [[Mac OS X 10.5]], the [[TextEdit]] application and [[Quick Look]] preview feature support the OpenDocument Text format.
 
Starting with [[Mac OS X 10.5]], the [[TextEdit]] application and [[Quick Look]] preview feature support the OpenDocument Text format.

by Cyberbot II at January 07, 2016 10:39 AM

January 03, 2016

Charles H. Schulz

The way you write

As the first post of 2016 on this blog I was wondering what I would be writing about. Not that I am lacking ideas but I was tinkering with a post about those never-happening new year resolutions. I ended up dropping this idea in favor of a question that is somewhat disturbing to me. Here it is:

I do promote and contribute to the LibreOffice project, the FOSS office suite. And yet it’s been two years I’m also talking about my use of Emacs in various ways. I quickly came to the realization that I was doing more and more things with Emacs that I could have done with LibreOffice. And yet I have not lost interest in the latter, quite the contrary. Is LibreOffice, or any office suite, not as effective as Emacs or other text editors?

The following is the personal point of view of someone who is not a developer even though I do edit CSS, html, php or javascript files from time to time.

The fundamental difference between a word processor and a text editor is not a matter of complexity or generation. Word processors simply do things differently than text editors, and both have existed side by side happily since the mid eighties. Whether they do things better is a completely different question, and perhaps a moot one, as a the different approaches serve different purposes. So let’s take the case where I need to write a fully detailed report about a given matter. The report will be roughly ten pages long, well formatted and with a rather strict constraint to use a predefined template. That template is usually not made with LaTeX but with a word processor. How would I go about creating this document, assuming I don’t know LaTex but use both a text editor and a word processor?

Let’s reason in a more simple way first. If I only use a word processor (which is the case of about 99% people out there) I do not really need to worry: I will go about using the same tool I’ve always been using and I may only hope that the word processor will handle the template well and that it won’t put too much formal constraint on what I can do in terms of formatting myself. If I only use a text editor, I need to see how I can work with the document template and see how I can add the text itself to that template so that at the end and actual document will be created.

These two different approaches do not necessarily highlight the superiority of the word processor; after all one could imagine an html template instead of one in OpenDocument Format or proprietary one. What it shows, however, is that a word processor deals with documents in a visual way. A text editor sticks pretty much to the text itself. The rest can be dealt with in other ways, either externally or in a programmatic method (with LaTex for instance). My point here is to stress that the two kind of tools rely on broadly different approaches.

Coming back to my previous example, here’s how I would go about writing the document using both tools. I would first organize my thoughts via the text editor, Emacs in my case, using mostly org-mode; perhaps if I needed to work on it in a more collaborative fashion (with friends or colleagues) I would need to bring portions of it on a wiki or a pad; I could use something like markdown-mode, or even good old html or text. Then I would insert the text into a new document, with LibreOffice for instance, and then I would finish editing both the text and the document. In my scenario, LibreOffice Writer is in charge of creating the actual document both in terms of design and content, while the genesis and perhaps the very rough content is handled by the text editor.

The big difference is the final output of both tools. It is a bit hard, unless one uses complex LaTeX macros (and I’m not even sure it’s possible) to create a document sticking to word processors’ templates. Sure, you can design beautiful documents in text editors using LaTeX but you need to learn how to programmatically design the document and you are still not integrating document templates from the outside. What’s more, mastering LaTeX to that level require quite some training and time to learn. While people can type anything in bold, italic or underlined with a word processor, the mastering of complex styles in it will require a rather small fraction of that time and energy.

There’s a beauty in using a word processor, especially if one knows how to use it well. There is a beauty in using a text editor, albeit of a quite different kind. The two philosophies may conflict at times but are from being mutually exclusive.

I hope I’ve shed some light on this question, at least for people who wonder why there are people still using text editors out there. What about you? How do you write?

Happy New Year everyone!

by Charles at January 03, 2016 05:14 PM

January 02, 2016

ODF Wikipedia Page

AnomieBOT: Dating maintenance tags: {{Dead link}}

Dating maintenance tags: {{Dead link}}

← Previous revision Revision as of 00:21, 2 January 2016
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{{Main|OpenDocument technical specification}}
 
{{Main|OpenDocument technical specification}}
   
The most common [[filename extension]]s used for OpenDocument documents are:<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html|title=UA.es|work=ua.es|language=es}}{{dead link}}</ref><ref name="hg flat opendocument">{{cite web |url=http://www.ensode.net/roller/dheffelfinger/entry/openoffice_documents_version_control_with |title=OpenOffice.org Document Version Control With Mercurial |accessdate=7 June 2010}}</ref>
+
The most common [[filename extension]]s used for OpenDocument documents are:<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html|title=UA.es|work=ua.es|language=es}}{{dead link|date=January 2016}}</ref><ref name="hg flat opendocument">{{cite web |url=http://www.ensode.net/roller/dheffelfinger/entry/openoffice_documents_version_control_with |title=OpenOffice.org Document Version Control With Mercurial |accessdate=7 June 2010}}</ref>
   
 
* <code>.odt</code> and <code>.fodt</code> for [[word processing]] (text) documents
 
* <code>.odt</code> and <code>.fodt</code> for [[word processing]] (text) documents

by AnomieBOT at January 02, 2016 12:21 AM

January 01, 2016

ODF Wikipedia Page

Mabdul: huch? there is no standardized base format + marking a dead ink

huch? there is no standardized base format + marking a dead ink

← Previous revision Revision as of 23:59, 1 January 2016
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{{Main|OpenDocument technical specification}}
 
{{Main|OpenDocument technical specification}}
   
The most common [[filename extension]]s used for OpenDocument documents are:<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html|title=UA.es|work=ua.es|language=es}}</ref><ref name="hg flat opendocument">{{cite web |url=http://www.ensode.net/roller/dheffelfinger/entry/openoffice_documents_version_control_with |title=OpenOffice.org Document Version Control With Mercurial |accessdate=7 June 2010}}</ref>
+
The most common [[filename extension]]s used for OpenDocument documents are:<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html|title=UA.es|work=ua.es|language=es}}{{dead link}}</ref><ref name="hg flat opendocument">{{cite web |url=http://www.ensode.net/roller/dheffelfinger/entry/openoffice_documents_version_control_with |title=OpenOffice.org Document Version Control With Mercurial |accessdate=7 June 2010}}</ref>
   
 
* <code>.odt</code> and <code>.fodt</code> for [[word processing]] (text) documents
 
* <code>.odt</code> and <code>.fodt</code> for [[word processing]] (text) documents
 
* <code>.ods</code> and <code>.fods</code> for [[spreadsheet]]s
 
* <code>.ods</code> and <code>.fods</code> for [[spreadsheet]]s
 
* <code>.odp</code> and <code>.fodp</code> for [[presentation]]s
 
* <code>.odp</code> and <code>.fodp</code> for [[presentation]]s
* <code>.odb</code> for [[database]]s
 
 
* <code>.odg</code> and <code>.fodg</code> for [[graphic]]s
 
* <code>.odg</code> and <code>.fodg</code> for [[graphic]]s
 
* <code>.odf</code> for [[formula]]e, mathematical equations
 
* <code>.odf</code> for [[formula]]e, mathematical equations

by Mabdul at January 01, 2016 11:59 PM

December 29, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

ZackTheCardshark at 02:56, 29 December 2015

← Previous revision Revision as of 02:56, 29 December 2015
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*[[LibreOffice]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[LibreOffice]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[Microsoft Office 2003]] and [[Microsoft Office XP|Office XP]] (with the Open Source OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://odf-converter.sourceforge.net/download.html#hRequirements|title=OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-ins for Office|accessdate={{Date|2014-01-31}}}}</ref>
 
*[[Microsoft Office 2003]] and [[Microsoft Office XP|Office XP]] (with the Open Source OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://odf-converter.sourceforge.net/download.html#hRequirements|title=OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-ins for Office|accessdate={{Date|2014-01-31}}}}</ref>
*[[Microsoft Office 2007]] (from service pack 2 release) supports ODF 1.1 <ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/press/2008/may08/05-21ExpandedFormatsPR.mspx|title=Microsoft Expands List of Formats Supported in Microsoft Office|publisher=Microsoft Corporation|date=21 May 2008|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
+
*[[Microsoft Office 2007]] (from service pack 2 release) supports ODF 1.1 <ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/press/2008/may08/05-21ExpandedFormatsPR.mspx|title=Microsoft Expands List of Formats Supported in Microsoft Office|publisher=Microsoft Corporation|date=21 May 2008|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> (Windows only)
*[[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1
+
*[[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1 (Windows only)
*[[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2
+
*[[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2 (Windows only)
 
*[[Microsoft OneDrive]] / [[Office Web Apps]]<ref>{{cite web|last=Foley |first=Mary Jo |url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-adds-odf-support-url-shortening-to-its-skydrive-storage-service/12480 |title=Microsoft adds ODF support, URL shortening to its SkyDrive storage service |publisher=ZDNet |date=17 April 2012 |accessdate=13 August 2012}}</ref>
 
*[[Microsoft OneDrive]] / [[Office Web Apps]]<ref>{{cite web|last=Foley |first=Mary Jo |url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-adds-odf-support-url-shortening-to-its-skydrive-storage-service/12480 |title=Microsoft adds ODF support, URL shortening to its SkyDrive storage service |publisher=ZDNet |date=17 April 2012 |accessdate=13 August 2012}}</ref>
 
*[[NeoOffice]]
 
*[[NeoOffice]]

by ZackTheCardshark at December 29, 2015 02:56 AM

ZackTheCardshark at 02:52, 29 December 2015

← Previous revision Revision as of 02:52, 29 December 2015
Line 181: Line 181:
 
*[[SoftMaker Office]]
 
*[[SoftMaker Office]]
 
*[[Sun Microsystems]] [[StarOffice]]
 
*[[Sun Microsystems]] [[StarOffice]]
  +
*[[TextEdit]]
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
 
Various organizations have announced development of conversion software (including ''plugins'' and ''filters'') to support OpenDocument on [[Microsoft]]'s products.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20060504015438308 | title=OpenDocument Foundation to MA: We Have a Plugin | date=4 May 2006 | accessdate=23 August 2006 | publisher=Groklaw}}</ref><ref>{{cite news | url=http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Microsoft_Office_to_get_a_dose_of_OpenDocument/0,130061733,139255766,00.htm | title=Microsoft Office to get a dose of OpenDocument | date=5 May 2006 | accessdate=6 December 2006|publisher=CNet}}</ref> {{asof|July 2007}}, there are nine packages of conversion software.<!--Commented out invalid reference <ref name="odf20070727"/>--> Microsoft first released support for the OpenDocument Format in Office 2007 SP2.<ref>{{cite web | title=Office 2007 SP2 Supports ODF | url=http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/164015/office_2007_sp2_supports_odf.html | date=28 April 2009 | publisher=PC World}}</ref> However, the implementation faced [[OpenDocument software#Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 support controversy|substantial criticism]] and the [[ODF Alliance]] and others claimed that the third party plugins provided better support.<ref name="sp2-fact-sheet">{{cite web | url=http://web.archive.org/web/20090611181719/http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf | title=Fact-sheet Microsoft ODF support | accessdate=24 May 2009 | quote=''MS Excel 2007 will process ODF spreadsheet documents when loaded via the Sun Plug-In 3.0 for MS Office or the SourceForge “OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office,” but will fail when using the “built-in” support provided by Office 2007 SP2.'' | publisher=odfalliance}}</ref> Microsoft Office 2010 can open and save OpenDocument Format documents natively, although not all features are supported.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/starter-help/differences-between-the-opendocument-text-odt-format-and-the-word-docx-format-HA010355788.aspx|title=Differences between the OpenDocument Text (.odt) format and the Word (.docx) format|work=office.microsoft.com}}</ref>
 
Various organizations have announced development of conversion software (including ''plugins'' and ''filters'') to support OpenDocument on [[Microsoft]]'s products.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20060504015438308 | title=OpenDocument Foundation to MA: We Have a Plugin | date=4 May 2006 | accessdate=23 August 2006 | publisher=Groklaw}}</ref><ref>{{cite news | url=http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Microsoft_Office_to_get_a_dose_of_OpenDocument/0,130061733,139255766,00.htm | title=Microsoft Office to get a dose of OpenDocument | date=5 May 2006 | accessdate=6 December 2006|publisher=CNet}}</ref> {{asof|July 2007}}, there are nine packages of conversion software.<!--Commented out invalid reference <ref name="odf20070727"/>--> Microsoft first released support for the OpenDocument Format in Office 2007 SP2.<ref>{{cite web | title=Office 2007 SP2 Supports ODF | url=http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/164015/office_2007_sp2_supports_odf.html | date=28 April 2009 | publisher=PC World}}</ref> However, the implementation faced [[OpenDocument software#Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 support controversy|substantial criticism]] and the [[ODF Alliance]] and others claimed that the third party plugins provided better support.<ref name="sp2-fact-sheet">{{cite web | url=http://web.archive.org/web/20090611181719/http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf | title=Fact-sheet Microsoft ODF support | accessdate=24 May 2009 | quote=''MS Excel 2007 will process ODF spreadsheet documents when loaded via the Sun Plug-In 3.0 for MS Office or the SourceForge “OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office,” but will fail when using the “built-in” support provided by Office 2007 SP2.'' | publisher=odfalliance}}</ref> Microsoft Office 2010 can open and save OpenDocument Format documents natively, although not all features are supported.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/starter-help/differences-between-the-opendocument-text-odt-format-and-the-word-docx-format-HA010355788.aspx|title=Differences between the OpenDocument Text (.odt) format and the Word (.docx) format|work=office.microsoft.com}}</ref>
   
[[Mac OS X 10.5]] offers both a new [[TextEdit]] version and [[Quick Look]] feature supporting the OpenDocument Text format (albeit with some formatting loss).{{Clarify|date=October 2009}}
+
Starting with [[Mac OS X 10.5]], the [[TextEdit]] application and [[Quick Look]] preview feature support the OpenDocument Text format.
   
 
===Accessibility===
 
===Accessibility===

by ZackTheCardshark at December 29, 2015 02:52 AM

December 22, 2015

EC Joinup

New document solution offers openness and accountability

Open source companies release preview of cloud-based document collaboration suite

Public administrations that value openness and accountability of their cloud-based document data, should try out Collabora Cloudsuite, a combination of LibreOffice and OwnCloud, recommends Michael Meeks, General Manager Collabora Productivity. “This cloudsuite will enable complete transparency and control of cloud-based document data."

read more

by Gijs Hillenius at December 22, 2015 08:29 AM

December 19, 2015

Google News

Apache OpenOffice - The Spoked 'B'log (blog)


The Spoked 'B'log (blog)

Apache OpenOffice
The Spoked 'B'log (blog)
OpenOffice is available in many languages, works on all common computers, stores data in ODF - the global open standard format - and is able to read and write files in other formats, included the format used by the most common office suite packages.

December 19, 2015 10:50 PM

Office 2016 for Mac Updated with OpenDocument Support, More - Thurrott.com (blog)


Thurrott.com (blog)

Office 2016 for Mac Updated with OpenDocument Support, More
Thurrott.com (blog)
OpenDocument Format (ODF) support. Office 2016 now supports ODF text, presentation and spreadsheet document types. This capability was also added to the Office Mobile apps for iOS. Easier screenshots. Now you can take a screenshot, or insert an ...

December 19, 2015 04:32 PM

Charles H. Schulz

LibreOffice Online is here!

This week Collabora has shown an early testing version of the cloud version of LibreOffice integrated with an Owncloud instance. To me and others, this marks a significant milestone in the story of LibreOffice and the Document Foundation. I’m aware that the code is not stabilized and there’s much work left to do, but by and large, LibreOffice now has its own cloud version. The repercussions of this won’t be immediately clear, in that they will likely really start when the first stable version is released along with a proper documentation so that anyone who has to administer 15 desktops can easily install and run it. code-logo

There are however a few comments I would like to make about this testing release. First, I’m very happy to see LibreOffice Online become a reality. By reality, I mean more than an announcement and more than a demo with chunks of code and configuration notes. Today, LibreOffice runs in the cloud. Which leads me to my second comment: the relevance of LibreOffice in the future is now pretty secure. Running LibreOffice in the browser needs you can access it without having to download the code and just by using the access gateway to everything these days: the browser.

LibreOffice_Initial-Artwork-Logo_ColorLogoContemporary_500pxThird, LibreOffice Online is a very interesting software. This is not a pad; this isn’t a lightweight office suite with limited creative and editing capabilities: it is -or will very soon be a full fledged LibreOffice with roughly the same features, the same document interoperability and compatibility running in a browser. In this regard, LibreOffice Online should be better compared to MS Office 365 than Google Docs or Etherpad. That is a pretty massive added value if you ask me. And this means that the cloud just got more interesting as this unusual contender to the established players is entering the arena.

Fourth, one of the key values of LibreOffice Online is one that neither Google Docs nor Office 365 actually provides: third-party integration. We have seen it since day one: LibreOffice Online was shown running and fully integrated within an Owncloud instance. This ability to integrate within other online platforms or tools will be one of the key success factors as well as one of the defining characteristics of LibreOffice OnLine as a business model. I feel compelled to mention the business model this early in the introduction of LibreOffice OnLine precisely because it is a cloud application. Do not expect the Document Foundation to offer LibreOffice Online for everyone, for free or as a subscription; the Document Foundation is not a cloud player expert at DevOps and cloud management. Rather, expect a market structured in three tiers where LibreOffice Online will be integrated into platforms such as Owncloud. The first tier will be the SME with local instance of LibreOffice Online serving their own with no or little professional support. The second tier will the large or medium organizations running LibreOffice Online (again, often integrated with other tools and platform) on premise. The third tier will be commercial cloud offerings with LibreOffice Online being provided as a subscription basis and tied to other cloud services such as storage and groupware as a service. In this picture I expect the Document Foundation to do pretty much what it has done (very well) with LibreOffice, which means it will be the code custodian, placeholder and ultimate place for governance of the development community of LibreOffice Online.

Last but not least, I would like to express my gratitude to the developers and specially to Collabora who are turning LibreOffice Online into something real. Since the inception of the LibreOffice project I have been not just a vocal supporter of a cloud version of LibreOffice, I have also tried to help advancing its cause as it always seemed to me that it would be a matter of profound strategic importance for the project and our community. 2016 is going to be exciting on this front.

Merry Christmas everyone!

by Charles at December 19, 2015 10:31 AM

December 18, 2015

Google News

4 Ways to Create an Ebook - Huffington Post


Huffington Post

4 Ways to Create an Ebook
Huffington Post
Most of us start with a manuscript -- a Microsoft Word, ODF (OpenOffice Document File), or RTF (Rich Text Format) doc that we're looking to turn into an ebook. Now, as I said last month, a Word doc isn't an ebook. But you can format the text and even ...

December 18, 2015 09:03 PM

December 17, 2015

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: LibreOffice: Advent Tip #17

donations_003LibreOffice allows to save different versions of the same document in the ODF file. The feature can be accessed with the menu File > Versions…, which opens the dialog windows on the left.

The different options on this dialog window allow to save a new version of the document, or to force the software to always save a new version on closing the document.

Once the different versions are saved, they are listed in the box of Existing Versions. The user can select each version, and perform several operations: open, show or delete each single version, or compare two versions.…

December 17, 2015 10:44 PM

Google News

New Windows 10 phones now come with Office Mobile preinstalled - VentureBeat


VentureBeat

New Windows 10 phones now come with Office Mobile preinstalled
VentureBeat
Now the OpenDocument Format (ODF) works with Word, Excel, and PowerPoint (this applies to Office 2016 apps for iOS as well), and you can also take and insert screenshots into documents, Koenigsbauer wrote. Word 2016 for Mac in particular now ...

and more »

December 17, 2015 07:52 PM