Planet ODF

January 30, 2015

UK Government

Statistical data set: Live tables on Energy Performance of Buildings Certificates

Updated: Updated tables.

These tables show data from certificates lodged on the Energy Performance of Buildings Registers since 2008, including average energy efficiency ratings, energy use, carbon dioxide emissions, fuel costs, average floor area sizes and numbers of certificates recorded.

Due to large file sizes some tables may take a while to download.

Table A1: Energy Performance Certificates for all properties by total floor area and type of property

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Table D1: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by energy efficiency rating

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Table D2: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by environmental impact rating

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Table D3: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by floor area, size, energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs

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Table D4(a): domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of transaction

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Table D4(b): domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of transaction and tenure

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Table D5: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of property and energy efficiency rating

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Table D6: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of property and environmental impact rating

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Table D7: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of property, average energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs

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Table LA1: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings in each local authority, by energy efficiency rating

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Table LA2: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings in each local authority, by environmental impact rating

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Table NB1: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by energy efficiency rating

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Table NB2: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by environmental impact rating

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Table NB3: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by floor area, size, energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs

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Table NB4: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by type of property

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Table NB5: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by type of property and energy efficiency rating

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Table NB6: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by type of property and environmental impact rating

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Table NB7: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by type of property, average energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs

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Table A: non-domestic Energy Performance Certificates by energy performance asset rating

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Table B: non-domestic Energy Performance Certificates by property group

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Table DEC1: Display Energy Certificates by local authority and energy performance operational rating

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Table DEC2: Display Energy Certificates - annual energy use and carbon dioxide emissions

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January 30, 2015 09:30 AM

Corporate information: Working for British High Commission New Delhi

Updated: new vacancy- ECO Integrity Officer

Welcome to the Working with us section of British High Commission in India.

The British High Commission and its offices across India offer a huge range of interesting jobs. The work of the BHC ranges from helping distressed British nationals, to political and economic analysis, to issuing visas, to tackling climate change, to promoting UK-India trade and much much more. This means that the jobs we have on offer cover all of these areas.

The British High Commission welcomes applications irrespective of race, colour, gender, disability, sexual orientation, religion, belief, creed or age.

Vacancies

British High Commission, Delhi

Last date of application is Monday, 2 February 2015 midnight

British High Commission, Delhi

Last date of application is Monday, 23 February 2015 midnight

British High Commission, Delhi

Last date of application is Sunday, 15 February 2015 midnight

British Deputy High Commission, Hyderabad

Last date of application is Thursday, 5 February 2015 midnight

British Deputy High Commission, Chennai

Last date of application is Sunday, 1 February 2015 midnight

British Deputy High Commission, Chennai

Last date of application is Friday, 20 February 2015 midnight

Jobs and lottery frauds. Beware!

Job offers from the UK Government:

  • The UK Government, including UK Trade and Investment, does not send unsolicited emails with job offers - either direct or through agents. Government vacancies are advertised on official websites in the UK or in India on the British High Commission’s website.
  • All British High Commission vacancies are filled through a competitive process managed by our Human Resources section. You will never be approached directly by the High Commissioner with an offer of a job.
  • Some job scams falsely use the names and job titles of genuine High Commission staff. A genuine email from an official member of staff will always be sent from our official email address - @fco.gov.uk. It will never be sent from a hotmail or yahoo type email account.

If the offer sounds too good to be true…beware. It could be a scam.

Many people in India are being cheated with job offers and lotteries that do not exist. Stop and think before you part with your money, your passport, your personal details or your current job.

Many scams may appear to come from the UK, but the criminals behind the scam are actually based in other countries.

It is likely to be a scam if:

  • You receive an offer of a job about which you have no prior knowledge
  • You receive an offer by email
  • You are asked for your bank account details by email or phone
  • You are offered cash in exchange for bank account details
  • You are told you have won a lottery, but you have not bought a ticket.

If you receive a scam email:

  • Do not pay any money
  • Do not have any further contact with the originators of the email - these people are professional criminals and their aim is to exploit you and take your money and/or your personal details.

If you have been cheated because of a job or lottery scam:

  • Report it to the Indian police authorities.

This is an international crime - investigations must be taken forward by the Indian police, CBI and Interpol. The British High Commission has no jurisdiction to investigate or take out criminal prosecutions in India.

How to find out if a UK company is genuine:

Some job scams can be very clever. Check the company’s details very carefully.

Genuine UK company websites may be provided, but the contact email addresses may be false. A genuine company name may be given, but the address will be wrong. For example: genuine website - www.ukvisas.gov.uk. False contact details - ukvisas@hotmail.co.uk.

  • Genuine UK companies are officially registered and can be checked by logging on to www.companieshouse.gov.uk
  • Phone the company in the UK if you are approached about a UK job
  • Genuine UK companies do not give a mobile number for contact details. Request a landline number
  • UK company addresses can be checked by logging on to: www.upmystreet.co.uk
  • Most genuine UK companies do not use a hotmail or yahoo type email account.

Job offers from the UK Government:

  • The UK Government, including UK Trade and Investment, does not send unsolicited emails with job offers - either direct or through agents. Government vacancies are advertised on official websites in the UK: www.careers-civilservice.gov.uk or in India on the British High Commission’s website.
  • Some job scams falsely use the names and job titles of genuine High Commission staff. A genuine email from an official member of staff will always be sent from our official email address - @fco.gov.uk. It will never be sent from a hotmail or yahoo type email account.

Research UK jobs and terms and conditions of employment:

Think about:

  • The credibility of the job offer you have received. Are the salary and benefits offered realistic? For example, for jobs in the hospitality sector, a monthly salary of £4,000 plus benefits of free car, free health insurance, free accommodation, free flights for you and your family, plus generous leave entitlements etc are simply not credible.

  • The recruitment procedure. Genuine UK companies normally have a rigorous recruitment procedure, including a face-to-face interview. They would not usually offer a job by email;

  • How you were contacted by the UK company. For example, if you met an employee in an internet chat room who then made you a job offer, this is very likely to be a scam.

Visa fees:

  • Current visa fees are published on the VFS website: www.vfs-uk-in.com
  • Visa application forms are free of charge. Information and guidance on application procedures are published on www.vfs-uk-in.com; www.ukvisas.gov.uk and www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk
  • British High Commission staff do not ask you for payment of fees directly. Visa fees are paid at VFS visa application centres where all applications are made. There are no “additional visa fees”
  • The UK Government does not provide or charge for “additional services” such as travel insurance, health screening checks, police checks, security checks etc.

Lottery scams:

  • All genuine UK lotteries are registered and have websites
  • If you did not buy a ticket, you cannot win a lottery
  • UK lotteries do not email winners or refer to amounts won
  • Further advice on lottery-related frauds is available from the Gambling Commission: log on to www.gamblingcommission.gov.uk.

January 30, 2015 06:18 AM

January 29, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

The best open-source office suite, LibreOffice 4.4, gets new release - ZDNet


ZDNet

The best open-source office suite, LibreOffice 4.4, gets new release
ZDNet
This makes it easier to use LibreOffice, and its native Open Document Format (ODF), when you're sharing work with colleagues. Behind all of these improvements, the LibreOffice programming team used Coverity code scanning software to find bugs.

and more »

January 29, 2015 08:01 PM

January 28, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: Criminal Justice System: Data Standards Forum guidance

Updated: Further data standards added: CJS National Court Codes 5.4.ods; CJS National Court Codes 5.4.zip;v National Court Code.pdf

Overview

The CJS in England and Wales uses a commonly agreed set of data standards to support ICT communications between the systems used by criminal justice organisations (CJOs). These data standards are designed specifically to support the operation of the CJS. They are to be used with open data standards as defined in the government’s Open Standards Principles. The government’s open standards are selected by the Cabinet Office standards hub.

Common data standards are used by CJOs, their ICT suppliers and potential suppliers wishing to bid for CJS contracts. They are also used to support the data analytics of criminal justice information.

These standards are available to the public under the Open Government Licence.

The selection of the CJS data standards is made by the CJS Data Standards Forum. This is a technical forum which has representatives from the principal CJOs.

Geography

The CJS data standards apply to all CJOs in England and Wales.

Data standards catalogue

CJS data standards catalogue 5.0

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CJS data standards catalogue 4.3

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CJS data standards catalogue 4.3 to 5.0 change log

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The catalogue contains data standards to support the exchange of criminal justice information between different CJOs. Only the latest version of the catalogue is current. Earlier versions of the catalogue are provided to:

  • track changes between the different versions to help organisations understand the practical implications of the ‘before’ and ‘after’ versions of altered standards
  • provide historical versions of the standards, especially those with lists of values, which may be used for historical reporting purposes and statistical analysis of historical data

A change log specifically identifies the changes between 2 successive versions of the catalogue. Use the change log to rapidly identify items that have changed between a version of the catalogue and its immediate successor.

How to use the catalogue

Use the CJS data standards when sending criminal justice information from one CJO to another. The data standards don’t have to be used within CJOs.

Options for implementing the CJS data standards

Each CJO can decide how to implement the standards. It can either

  • map its internal data standards to the criminal justice data standards when sending information to a different CJO
  • adopt one or more of the CJS data standards as its internal data standard. This avoids the costs and performance impacts of mapping to the CJS data standards when sending information to a different CJO

Each CJO should make its decision on how to use the CJS data standards based on the contribution those standards make both in terms of the system’s functional and non-functional requirements and in the context of a total cost of ownership model.

Ensuring CJS data standards implementation

To ensure that the CJS data standards are used, CJOs should contractually specify that:

  • suppliers comply with the CJS data standards for the transmission of information both for ICT development and during service management
  • ICT suppliers monitor the CJS data standards web pages and always use the latest versions of those standards
  • the latest version of the CJS data standards is downloaded directly from the CJS data standards web pages
  • suppliers subscribe to receive updates to the CJS data standards

Subscribing to updates of this page will give you notifications of:

  • new versions of the catalogue
  • new versions of standards which have yet to be entered into a new version of the catalogue
  • updates to code lists

CJOs should also consider mapping the data standards to any supporting technical documentation such as logical data models and interface specifications.

Types of data standard

The catalogue includes 3 different types of data standard:

  • formatting standards
  • organisational structure standards
  • reference data standards

Formatting standards

These are concerned with the structure of a common type of data item such as Dates or Notes fields in a message or a database table. Use the common format for such items when you send information between different organisations. Formatting standards don’t have lists of actual values associated with them.

Organisational structure standards

Organisational structure standards describe the logical structure of an organisation. You can use these to work out the allocation of responsibilities in that they uniquely identify organisational units. This helps the correct transmission of information from one part of a CJO to part of a different CJO. Use organisational structure standards also to support reporting.

Reference data standards

A reference data standard categorises other data by using a commonly accepted list of mutually exclusive values. For example, a record for a person might include the person’s gender by use of the reference data standard ‘Gender Type Code’. Using a common list of such values across the CJS helps create a shared understanding of the correct interpretation of such classifications.

Code lists for data standards

Many of the lists for the reference data standards and organisational structure standards are comparatively small. In those cases the complete list for that standard is given in the catalogue.

A smaller number of standards are either too large to put in the catalogue or are subject to comparatively frequent change. In either of these cases the CJO that stewards the specific standard must provide that list. Each data standard in the catalogue specifies the organisation that acts as its steward.

Where the stewarding body is the Data Standards Forum itself, or where the body falls under the remit of the Ministry of Justice (MOJ), the lists of the data values are provided here.

Code lists for reference data standards

The lists of data values for reference data standards managed either by the Data Standards Forum or MOJ which are not in the catalogue are:

Code lists for organisational structure standards

The lists of data values for organisational structure standards are all elements of the ‘Organisation Unit (OU) Identifier’ structure of the data standards catalogue. The top level codes are specified in the catalogue. Elements below the top level are managed separately by the various CJOs. The code lists for HMCTS magistrates and Crown Courts are given below:

CJSE courts BC OU codes v7.4

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CJS standards and open standards

The CJS data standards are sector specific. Any interested party can use them, subject to the Open Government Licence. They are different from the open standards selected for government IT. The open standards are at the Cabinet Office’s standards hub.

If there’s a choice between the 2, then open standards must take precedence as they are mandated by Cabinet Office policy.

Engaging with the Data Standards Forum

The CJS Data Standards Forum undertakes technical management of the CJS data standards. All of the principal CJOs are represented on the forum.

If you’re a member of a CJO, contact your forum representative for any issues related to CJS data standards. This includes queries about particular standards, change requests to existing standards or requirements for new standards.

Suppliers should contact their contracting CJO to raise any issues relating to the CJS data standards. In turn, the CJO should contact their representative on the forum.

If your CJO doesn’t have a representative and you want to get involved, contact the chair at CJSDataStandards@justice.gsi.gov.uk

Changes to the standards

There are 2 types of process which could result in a change to the CJS Data Standards catalogue:

  • a CJO can raise a change request to create, update or retire a data standard
  • forum representatives may initiate changes as part of a continued review process of the contents of the catalogue.

Continued review

The Data Standards Forum continuously reviews the catalogue as a standing action. The aim is to produce a set of standards that is as small as possible while still being fit for purpose. It contributes to the ‘Value for Money’ agenda by focusing on existing business need to reduce the costs of compliance. Each forum meeting reviews a number of the standards to ensure that they’re relevant and meet the business need.

Notification of changes

Changes to standards will be posted here. They will stay here until they’ve been included into a new version of the catalogue.

National court code

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January 28, 2015 05:22 PM

Apache OpenOffice Blog

LibreOffice erscheint demnächst für Android - ZDNet.de


LibreOffice erscheint demnächst für Android
ZDNet.de
Wie der Name andeutet, beschränkt sich der Funktionsumfang des LibreOffice Viewer darauf, Dokumente im Open Document Format (ODF) sowie Microsoft-Office-Dateien zu lesen. Eine Bearbeitung ist hingegen nicht möglich. Die Beta kann bisher nur ...

and more »

January 28, 2015 03:57 PM

LibreOffice Viewer als bèta voor Android - Computable


LibreOffice Viewer als bèta voor Android
Computable
De eerste versie van de LibreOffice Viewer voor Android is beschikbaar in de Google Play Store. De LibreOffice Viewer is uitgebracht door Collabora en geeft gebruikers mobiel toegang tot Open Document Format (ODF) bestanden op apparaten zoals tablets ...

January 28, 2015 09:07 AM

January 23, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

LibreOffice Viewer pour Android : visualisez vos documents ODF et Microsoft Office - Next INpact


Next INpact

LibreOffice Viewer pour Android : visualisez vos documents ODF et Microsoft Office
Next INpact
LibreOffice vient de mettre en ligne sa première application Android, en bêta pour le moment, permettant de visualiser ses documents ODF (Open Document Format) et Office. Certains éléments complexes ne sont par contre pas encore pris en charge.

and more »

January 23, 2015 03:05 PM

LibreOffice Viewer für Android als Betaversion - Pro-Linux


IT Magazine

LibreOffice Viewer für Android als Betaversion
Pro-Linux
Neben den offenen ODF-Formaten kann der LibreOffice Viewer für Android auch Dokumente in den proprietären Formaten von MS Office darstellen. Viele weitere Funktionen für die App sind geplant, werden aber noch ihre Zeit brauchen. Die App benötigt ...
Beta von LibreOffice Viewer für Android verfügbarZDNet.de

all 10 news articles »

January 23, 2015 10:45 AM

January 22, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

LibreOffice Viewеr – вече е наличен за Android - Tech News


Tech News

LibreOffice Viewеr – вече е наличен за Android
Tech News
Потребителите на Android смартфони и таблети получават достъп до файлове във формат ODF (Open Document Format), съобщиха от разработчика на отворения офис пакет – The Document Foundation (TDF). Приложението, създадено от ...

and more »

January 22, 2015 11:32 AM

January 21, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Suíte de escritório LibreOffice chega ao Android. - Boa Informação


Suíte de escritório LibreOffice chega ao Android.
Boa Informação
O formato mais usado pela aplicação é o Open Document Format (ODF). Outros formatos, como os do Microsoft Office, também são aceitos. A lista completa é de: .odt, .odp, .ods, .ots, .ott, .otp, .docx, .pptx, .xlsx, .dotx, .xltx, .ppsx, .doc, .ppt, .xls ...

and more »

January 21, 2015 05:24 PM

Suíte de escritório LibreOffice chega ao Android - Tudocelular.com


Tudocelular.com

Suíte de escritório LibreOffice chega ao Android
Tudocelular.com
O formato mais usado pela aplicação é o Open Document Format (ODF). Outros formatos, como os do Microsoft Office, também são aceitos. A lista completa é de: .odt, .odp, .ods, .ots, .ott, .otp, .docx, .pptx, .xlsx, .dotx, .xltx, .ppsx, .doc, .ppt, .xls ...

and more »

January 21, 2015 05:08 PM

January 19, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: The Scotland Act 2012

Scotland Act 2012

The Scotland Act introduces the Scottish rate of income tax which is expected to be introduced from April 2016. HMRC consulted with groups on how the introduction of the Scottish rate would impact on other areas of the income tax system. The work of these groups has been completed and copies of papers are available below. A technical note has been published which sets out the approach to various proposals.

Pensions Technical Group

1 November 2010

Agenda (ODT, 5.56KB) ; Background note (ODT, 12.2KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 32.3KB)

11 January 2011

Agenda (ODT, 9.52KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 18.1KB)

10 May 2011

Agenda (ODT, 8.32KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 22.1KB) ; Proposal - Option 1a (ODT, 14KB)

22 July 2011

Agenda (ODT, 8.03KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 17.7KB) ; Proposal - Option 1b (ODT, 14.5KB) Pensions Relief Journeys (PDF, 115KB, 19 pages) ; Letter to Calman Pensions Technical Group (ODT, 464KB)

16 September 2011

Agenda (ODT, 8.04KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 15.5KB)

30 October 2012

Agenda (ODT, 7.96KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 11.9KB)

18 April 2013

Pension relief at source - Pensions industry option (ODT, 9.36KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 12.7KB)

10 October 2013

Agenda (ODT, 5.27KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 14.1KB)

Charities Technical Group

(One meeting only)

11 October 2010

Minutes (ODT, 12KB)

Income Tax Technical Group

25 October 2010

The Calman Income Tax Technical Group meeting invitation letter (ODT, 102KB) ; Agenda (ODT, 21.3KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 37.8KB)

10 January 2011

Agenda (ODT, 7.65KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 26.3KB)

17 March 2011

Agenda (ODT, 19.7KB) ; Terms of Reference for the Scottish Rate of Income Tax Technical Group (ODT, 16.2KB) ; Scottish Taxpayer definition (ODT, 11.9KB) ; Calman Commission summary (ODT, 8.18KB) ; Scottish Taxpayer - Decision Chart (PDF, 24.4KB, 2 pages) ; Income Tax Terminology - in the context of the Scotland Bill (PDF, 19.2KB, 1 page) ; Minutes (ODT, 36.1KB)

26 May 2011

Agenda (ODT, 19.7KB) ; Real Estate Investment Trusts (ODT, 5.96KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 40.5KB)

07 September 2011

Agenda (ODT, 20.9KB) ; Discussion paper on the interaction between the Scottish rate and trusts, trustees and trust income (ODT, 12.9KB) ; PAYE Settlement Agreements and the Scotland Bill (ODT, 7.43KB) ; PAYE Settlement Agreements and the Scotland Bill - Examples (ODT, 14.3KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 24.1KB)

4 December 2011

Agenda (ODT, 23.1KB) ; Transparency of the Scottish rate of income tax (ODT, 14.2KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 21.5KB) ; Minutes (ODT, 24.1KB)

Technical Note

Clarifying the Scope of the Scottish Rate of Income Tax - Technical Note May 2012

January 19, 2015 04:57 PM

January 16, 2015

Apache OpenOffice Blog

How to transfer ODT files with Google Docs and Microsoft Word Online - TechRepublic


How to transfer ODT files with Google Docs and Microsoft Word Online
TechRepublic
Public officials with the people's interests at heart prefer open formats and channels. In July 2014, the UK selected the "Open Document Format (ODF) for sharing or collaborating on government documents." The idea is that a move to open formats "will ...

January 16, 2015 02:22 AM

January 15, 2015

UK Government

Statistical data set: Live tables on homelessness

Updated: Added footnote in table 775.

Live tables

Figures for individual local authorities are given in tables 784, 784a, 792 and 793.

Table 770: decisions taken by local authorities under the Housing Act 1996 on applications from eligible households, England

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Table 770a: decisions taken by local authorities on eligible households owed the reapplication duty under section 195a of the Localism Act 2011, England 2011 to 2014

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Table 771: households accepted by local authorities as owed a main homelessness duty by ethnicity, England 1998 to 2014

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Table 773: households accepted by local authorities as owed a main homelessness duty by priority need category, England 1998 to 2014

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Table 774: households accepted by local authorities as owed a main homelessness duty by reason for loss of last settled home, England 1998 to 2014

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Table 775: households in temporary accommodation by type of accommodation, and cases where duty owed but no accommodation has been secured at the end of each quarter, England, London and Rest of England 1998 to 2014

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Table 777: immediate outcome of decision by local authority to accept household as unintentionally homeless, eligible and in priority need

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Table 778: households leaving temporary accommodation (or no longer recorded 'duty owed, no accommodation secured'), by outcome, England 1998 to 2014

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Table 779: households leaving temporary accommodation (or no longer recorded as 'duty owed, no accommodation secured') during each quarter, by length of time since acceptance, England and London, 1998 to 2014

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Table 780: homeless households in priority need accepted by local authorities by household type, England 2006 to 2014

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Table 781: homeless households in priority need accepted by local authorities by age of applicant, England 2006 to 2014

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Table 782: household types in temporary accommodation, England 2006 to 2014

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Table 784: local authorities' action under the homelessness provisions of the Housing Acts, financial year 2013 to 2014

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Table 784a: local authorities' action under the homelessness provisions of the Housing Acts: quarterly data for financial year 2014 to 2015

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Table 785: local authority assistance to foreign nationals under homelessness provisions of the Housing Act 1996 - decisions on applications for assistance, England

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Table 786: local authority assistance to foreign nationals under homelessness provisions of the Housing Act 1996 - reason for eligibily of accepted households, England

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Table 787: outcome of homelessness prevention and relief, England, 2009-10 to 2013-14

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Table 788: type of homelessness prevention and relief, England, 2009-10 to 2013-14

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Table 789: cases assisted to obtain alternative accommodation broken down by prevention and relief, England, 2009-10 to 2013-14

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Table 792: total reported cases of homelessness prevention and relief by outcome and local authority, 2009-10 to 2013-14

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Table 793: families with children in bed and breakfast accommodation for more than 6 weeks excluding those pending review, by local authority, quarterly data from 2012 Q4

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Detailed local authority level responses

Detailed local authority level homelessness figures: July to September 2014

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Detailed local authority level homelessness figures: April to June 2014

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Detailed local authority level homelessness figures: January to March 2014

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Detailed local authority level homelessness figures: October to December 2013

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Detailed local authority level homelessness figures: July to September 2013

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Detailed local authority level homelessness figures: April to June 2013

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Detailed local authority level homelessness figures: January to March 2013

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Detailed local authority level homelessness figures: October to December 2012

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Detailed local authority level homelessness figures: July to September 2012

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Detailed local authority level homelessness figures: April to June 2012

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Detailed local authority level responses: prevention and relief

Detailed local authority level homelessness prevention and relief figures: 2013 to 2014

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Detailed local authority level homelessness prevention and relief figures: 2012 to 2013

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Discontinued tables

Tables 772, 776, 783, 790 and 791 have been discontinued and are no longer being updated. They have been frozen following the decision made that regional totals should not be published in DCLG statistics with effect from 1 October 2012.

Table 772: homeless households accepted by local authorities, by region (final version)

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Table 776: homeless households in temporary accommodation at the end of each quarter, by region (final version)

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Table 783: homeless households in temporary accommodation at the end of each quarter, by type of accommodation and region (final version)

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Table 790: outcome of homelessness prevention and relief by region, England, 2009-10 to 2011-12 (final version)

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Table 791: total cases of homelessness prevention and relief by type and region, England, 2009-10 to 2011-12 (final version)

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January 15, 2015 02:25 PM

Charles H. Schulz

The Document Foundation: a personal outlook for 2015

2015 has started and I realized that in between the New Year and last week’s tragedy, I hadn’t had the time to discuss what’s on the table for the Document Foundation in 2015. This is purely a personal opinion and does not represent any sort of official statement by the Foundation. Let’s try to keep this somewhat synthetic. LibreOffice_external_logo_200px

More & better software

  • 2015 will be the year of mobility for LibreOffice. The end of 2014 had seen the announcement of CloudOn’s new office suite for iPad, and this office suite is basically powered by LibreOffice. 2015 will see the first results of the development of our Android version. Don’t look for a scoop here: it will be gradual so you will have to take every announcement from the Document Foundation on Android as a chapter in a story.
  • Cloud-wise, the work is still ongoing. You may think we’re taking a long time doing this – and there’s some truth in that. It is important however to consider the following: a cloud version of LibreOffice is not about starting from scratch and releasing something like etherpad. Quite the contrary: it is about “porting” (for lack of a better term) LibreOffice in the cloud, with most of its feature. And that takes a lot of effort, which means constant work by developers who would be glad to have their work subsidized in some way, but who also work on several existing projects, including LibreOffice itself.
  • It is hard to predict how LibreOffice will evolve in 2015 as we do not work with roadmaps. But from what I can see, I see three trends. The first one is a better, more beautiful interface for the OS X version. This was started sometime in 2013, but it will be a reality starting soon, with the upcoming release of the 4.4. The second trend did start with the 4.0 release: more powerful spreadsheets with more features. The third one stems from the benefit of having a more active UX / Design team: improvements in the user interface are being released more frequently and are thus more visible now. LibreOffice-4.4-OS-X
  • Even more document filters: better compatibility with OOXML, Abiword, Clarisworks, Corel… and even better: filters that can be reused by every other FOSS document editors, thanks to the active Document Liberation Project.

A stronger foundation

I guess it’s difficult to know these things before you have experienced them first, but managing and growing a foundation like the Stiftung or any other similar entity such as its counterpart in France, Switzerland or Italy is a full time job. It requires detail and accuracy in execution and the the management of the structure, but since the foundation relies on the community for its actual activities, it requires the involvement of all kinds of people, which in turns implies that a complex human ensemble has to work with a complex yet robust legal machinery. The situation is gradually improving. The employees and contractors of the foundation have the rare quality of being great community members and fit well within the operations of the foundation. I expect these operations to improve and accelerate in 2015 because of all these factors. Which also means you should expect more announcements from the foundation this year.

A larger, more diverse community

Our community is growing and more interestingly, the way it is growing is not only by the arrival of new contributors to the code, but also by new, non technical contributors who may be more familiar with social networks than with mailing list. Even more importantly, we seem to gather traction everywhere with the arrival of contributors whose native language is not English and whose mastering of that language is all but certain. This means that now we have very active community members who are outside mailing lists but on social networks: Google +, Twitter, LibreOffice, and on websites that are in languages completely different than English, while contributing locally without necessarily liaising with the more “central” project. We need to take this into account – and being part of the Membership Committee I can say this is an important discussion we are having and will continue to have this year. This also calls for more awareness in how we work with each other, acknowledgement of contributions; on the other hand, it suggests that we finally get to tackle the need for a more formal management of our relationship with local entities.

But above everything else: let’s continue to have fun! Thank you everyone for your time and efforts you dedicate to this project. I’m looking forward to a great year 2015.

by Charles at January 15, 2015 11:14 AM

January 10, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

Fitoschido: /* Accessibility */

Accessibility

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===Accessibility===
 
===Accessibility===
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The [[specification]] of OpenDocument has undergone an accessibility review, and a few additions were made to version 1.1 of the specification to improve accessibility. Many of the components it is built on, such as [[Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language]] and [[Scalable Vector Graphics]], have already gone through the [[World Wide Web Consortium]]'s [[Web Accessibility Initiative]] processes.{{citation needed|date=December 2012}}
 
The [[specification]] of OpenDocument has undergone an accessibility review, and a few additions were made to version 1.1 of the specification to improve accessibility. Many of the components it is built on, such as [[Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language]] and [[Scalable Vector Graphics]], have already gone through the [[World Wide Web Consortium]]'s [[Web Accessibility Initiative]] processes.{{citation needed|date=December 2012}}
   

by Fitoschido at January 10, 2015 02:49 PM

January 09, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: Party Wall etc Act 1996: guidance

Updated: Added updated guidance document and example letter templates.

Introduction

The Party Wall etc Act 1996 provides a framework for preventing and resolving disputes in relation to party walls, boundary walls and excavations near neighbouring buildings.

A building owner proposing to start work covered by the Act must give adjoining owners notice of their intentions in the way set down in the Act. Adjoining owners can agree or disagree with what is proposed. Where they disagree, the Act provides a mechanism for resolving disputes.

The Act is separate from obtaining planning permission or building regulations approval.

What is a party wall?

The main types of party walls are:

  • a wall that stands on the lands of 2 (or more) owners and forms part of a building - this wall can be part of one building only or separate buildings belonging to different owners
  • a wall that stands on the lands of 2 owners but does not form part of a building, such as a garden wall but not including timber fences
  • a wall that is on one owner’s land but is used by 2 (or more) owners to separate their buildings

The Act also uses the expression ‘party structure’. This could be a wall or floor partition or other structure separating buildings or parts of buildings in different ownership, such as in flats.

What the Act covers

The Act covers:

  • new building on or at the boundary of 2 properties
  • work to an existing party wall or party structure
  • excavation near to and below the foundation level of neighbouring buildings

This may include:

  • building a new wall on or at the boundary of 2 properties
  • cutting into a party wall
  • making a party wall taller, shorter or deeper
  • removing chimney breasts from a party wall
  • knocking down and rebuilding a party wall
  • digging below the foundation level of a neighbour’s property

Explanatory booklet

This provides detailed guidance on the Party Wall etc Act 1996. The guidance explains how the Act may affect a building owner who wishes to carry out work covered by the Act or an adjoining building owner who receives notification under the Act of proposed work.

This guidance has been further updated in January 2015 to make it clearer and provide answers to more regularly asked questions. For example: What a party wall award can cover? What to do if a building becomes unsafe? Or, there is excessive noise from the work being carried out? And what is the role of the surveyor?

The Party Wall etc Act 1996: explanatory booklet

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Example letters

Templates for the example letters in Part 5 of the guidance are available to download.

Example letter 1: party structure notice

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Example letter 2: positive acknowledgement of party structure notice

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Example letter 3: negative acknowledgement of party structure notice

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Example letter 4: line of junction notice - new wall astride the boundary

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Example letter 5: acknowledgement of line of junction notice - new

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Example letter 6: line of junction notice - new wall wholly on your own land

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Example letter 7: acknowledgement of line of junction notice - new wall wholly on your own land

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Example letter 8: 3/6 metre notice

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Example letter 9: positive acknowledgement of 3/6 metre notice

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Example letter 10: negative acknowledgement of 3/6 metre notice

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Further information

We continue to welcome feedback on how useful you have found the publication to help us improve guidance on the Party Wall etc Act 1996 in the future by completing the following short survey.

January 09, 2015 03:36 PM

Corporate information: Research at DfE

Updated: Added call for expressions of interest for project 2014025: 'Review of arrangements for disagreement resolution: special educational needs and disabilities (SEND)'.

Overview

Our social research aims to provide high-quality evidence to inform policy development and delivery.

Building evidence into our services is crucial to improving the education and children’s services we provide. We have published a collection of papers which set out research priorities and questions across education and children’s services for the research community, sector and department. We hope these papers will encourage researchers, sector organisations and practitioners to discuss research needs and contribute to the development of our policy and practice.

More information on how we are building evidence into education and children’s services is available from our ‘research priorities for education and children’s services’ collection.

Publications

You can find our published research reports from the last 5 years in GOV.UK’s publications section.

Archived publications

Our archived research is available from the National Archives.

Current research

You can find a list of our current research contracts on Contracts Finder.

Invitations to tender for new projects

You must submit an expression of interest (EOI) in order to be considered for an invitation to tender. Please use the expression of interest form (ODT, 29.7KB) to be considered. To express an interest you must first be registered with us and will need your ID number.

To register, please complete the supplier registration form.

All contracts are let on the basis of our terms and conditions. We encourage you to read the EOI guide before submitting your EOI. There is also a style guide and template for contractors writing research publications.

Submission of an EOI does not guarantee an invitation to tender, and the department does not routinely advise organisations that they have not been successful. However, we will provide feedback if you request it.

Calls for expressions of interest

Project 2014025: Review of arrangements for disagreement resolution: special educational needs and disabilities (SEND)

Expressions of interest (EOIs) are invited for project 2014025: Review of arrangements for disagreement resolution: special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) (PDF, 127KB, 3 pages) . The deadline for expressions of interest is midday on 23 January 2015.

Project 2014027 (1 of 2): Evidence on the impact of working longer for the teachers’ working longer review

Expressions of interest (EOIs) are invited for project 2014027: Evidence on the impact of working longer for the teachers’ working longer review (PDF, 220KB, 3 pages) . The deadline for expressions of interest is midday on 12 January 2015.

Project 2014027 (2 of 2): Evidence on the employment practice for the teachers’ working longer review

Expressions of interest (EOIs) are invited for project 2014027: Evidence on the employment practice for the teachers’ working longer review (PDF, 222KB, 4 pages) . The deadline for expressions of interest is midday on 12 January 2015.

Project 2014023: Understanding the customer journey to initial teacher training (ITT)

Expressions of interest (EOIs) are invited for project 2014023: Understanding the customer journey to initial teacher training (ITT) (PDF, 216KB, 5 pages) . The deadline for expressions of interest is midday on 12 January 2015.

EOI ID number and general enquiries

If you have a query about your EOI ID number, please email us at: enquiries.rbu@education.gsi.gov.uk.

For all other enquiries about the Department for Education’s research, please contact us.

Research centres

From 2010 to 2014 we worked with a number of independent organisations who provided us with national and international evidence. The following research centres were under contract with DfE and are now finishing the work commissioned by us:

January 09, 2015 09:30 AM

January 08, 2015

UK Government

News story: Africa Prosperity Fund: Call for bids

Updated: Added link to strategy document

The Prosperity Fund is the FCO’s dedicated annual fund supporting prosperity work overseas. Through targeted projects, it aims to support the conditions for global and UK growth: Openness, Sustainability, Opportunity and Reputation. The Prosperity Fund has devolved £300k to Africa Strategy and Network Unit (ASNU) to fund a project up to the value of £285k for our High Level Prosperity Partnership (HLPP) target countries of Angola, Cote D’Ivoire, Ghana, Mozambique and Tanzania. The remaining £15k will be held by ASNU for contingencies.

We are pleased to announce the call for bids for the for the Africa Prosperity (HLPP) Fund for financial year 2015 to 2016.

How to apply

  • Detailed guidance on how to apply is contained below in the Guidance for Potential Implementers. Please read this document carefully, together with the FAQs.
  • Please also familiarise yourself at an early stage with the standard grant contract.
  • Bidding templates are provided below. The deadline for submitting project concepts to ASNU is 19 January 2015. Concept bids should be no more than three pages in length.
  • We would expect one project bid up to £285k with a range of activities covering the targeted sectors across the some or all of the five HLPP countries. This reflects the strategic nature of the Africa Prosperity (HLPP) Fund and the need for high impact (please see A.
  • The project should be planned so that they are implemented and completed by March 2016.

How proposals are assessed:

Bids will be assessed against the following criteria:

  • Value for money
  • Strategic fit
  • Evidence of local demand or need
  • Project viability, including capacity of implementing organisation(s)
  • Project design, including clear achievable impact
  • Sustainability
  • Risk and stakeholder management

Key documents

Please read the guidance for 2015 to 2016. These documents cover the type of projects that we would like to see, the application process, ensuring a quality bid and getting the budget right.

Full proposal documents

Implementers will be invited to submit a full proposal if their project concept is successful.

Please see the full proposal forms and template activity based budget below:

January 08, 2015 11:28 AM

January 05, 2015

UK Government

Detailed guide: Provide drink-drive rehabilitation scheme courses

Updated: Updated Annex A

Find out how to take a drink-drive rehabilitation course if you’ve been found guilty of a drink-drive offence.

Foreword

The opportunity for those convicted of relevant drink offences to attend an approved course is derived from recommendations in the Road Traffic Law Review Report (North, P. 1988) and these are reflected in sections 34A to 34C of the Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988 (RTOA) as amended by the Road Safety Act 2006.

The recommendations led to the creation of the Drink-drive rehabilitation scheme (DDRS), an introduction to which is in part 1 of this document. Under the DDRS, the Secretary of State approves courses for the rehabilitation of drivers and part 2 of this document sets out the approach to the approval process.

Under section 34C (1) RTOA the Secretary of State may issue guidance as to the conduct of approved courses. Such guidance sets out the minimum requirements for course content and delivery and is set out in part 3 of this document. Failure to follow this guidance may result in the withdrawal of course approval.

Additionally part 4 of this document sets out the role of the court and this may assist in promoting consistent application and administrative procedures in the operation of the scheme by courts in England and Scotland.

This document is produced by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA). It replaces the Department for Transport (DfT) guidance of September 2010.

Other documents to read

Documents to be read in conjunction with the course guidance are:

You can read the following legislation on the legislation.gov.uk website:

Introduction and aim

This document is comprised of 4 parts and is intended to have application only in England and Scotland:

  • part 1 - “Introduction and aim” is an introduction to the Drink-drive rehabilitation scheme (DDRS) and sets out its aim
  • part 2 -“Approval of DDRS courses”sets out the approach of the Secretary of State, acting by way of DVSA, to the approval of courses under the DDRS
  • part 3 - “The conduct of approved courses” consists of guidance to providers of approved DDRS courses in England and Scotland issued under the Secretary of State’s powers in section 34C (1) of the Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988 (RTOA)
  • part 4 - “The role of the courts” explains the role of the courts and is intended as a brief guide to their role in relation to the DDRS for those providing courses and those attending them

Note: In this guide, in relation to England and Scotland, ‘courts’ applies to Magistrates and Crown Courts in England and, in Scotland, Sheriff and District Courts (when constituted by a Stipendiary Magistrate) plus the High Court of Justiciary, unless there is specific reference to ‘supervising court’.

Since 1 January 2000, courts throughout Great Britain have had the power to refer a person to an approved Drink-drive rehabilitation course if convicted of a drink-drive related offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 (RTA), and for which the court has disqualified them from driving for at least 12 months. The relevant sections are:

  • 3A - causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs
  • 4 - driving or being in charge when under the influence of drink or drugs
  • 5 - driving or being in charge with excess alcohol
  • 7 - failing to provide a specimen

The new section 34A RTOA expands the range of drink-related offences which fall within the DDRS and these are now referred to as ‘relevant drink offences’. This new section 34A is, in respect of relevant drink offences, fully in force on 24 June 2013. At the time of sentencing for a relevant drink offence a court may make a referral order, reducing the period of disqualification by not less than three months, and no more than one quarter, of the disqualified period on satisfactory completion of a DDRS course.

DDRS courses offered must be approved by the Secretary of State (section 34A(6) RTOA). The courses are intended to offer an educational opportunity to those convicted of relevant drink offences, in order to reduce the likelihood they will reoffend. The approved DDRS courses are not available to those who have committed drug-drive offences.

The significance of the guidance in section ‘The conduct of approval courses’ is twofold: under section 34C(1)(a) RTOA, course providers must have regard to it. Failure to follow this guidance may result in the withdrawal of course approval. Under section 34C(1)(b) the courts shall have regard to the guidance when deciding whether any instructions or requirements of a course provider are reasonable.

The responsibility for the DDRS in Scotland remains with the Department for Transport (DfT).

The responsibility for the DDRS in Wales resides with the Welsh Assembly Government.

This DDRS does not apply to Northern Ireland (NI), but similar statutory arrangements are in place in NI, enabling convicted and disqualified drivers to be offered a referral to a drink-drive related training course approved within NI. There are no reciprocal arrangements between NI and mainland UK for referring offenders. In practice, this means that where a relevant offence is committed in one jurisdiction, the court is unable to refer the offender to a DDRS, or similar, course in the other jurisdiction.

The aim of the DDRS is to provide drink-drive offenders with appropriate education to help them recognise the problems associated with drink-driving. The information and experience provided by the course is intended to enable individuals to change their behaviour, in order to prevent further offending. It is intended to reduce reoffending and contribute positively to improved road safety.

Following the nationwide expansion of the scheme in January 2000 the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) was commissioned by DfT to monitor the operation of the scheme and to evaluate its effectiveness and the courses provided by individual organisations TRL report number 613. The research found that there was a marked benefit to all offenders undertaking a DDRS course.

The TRL report also demonstrated that offenders who had not attended a DDRS course were between 2 and 3 times more likely to reoffend than those who had undertaken a course. This figured applied up to 2 years after the initial conviction.

Section 34A (5) RTOA enables a court to make an order reducing the period of disqualification if, by a specified date, an offender satisfactorily completes a course approved by the Secretary of State.

The purpose of an approved DDRS course is to enable those convicted of certain drink-driving behaviour to benefit from an educational opportunity designed to discourage drink-drive related reoffending, and thereby contribute to reducing road casualties by improving decision making and driving behaviour.

No course has been approved for the purposes of drug-driving rehabilitation.

Approval of DDRS courses

DDRS courses can only be approved by the Secretary of State who, as mentioned, acts by way of the DVSA in this respect. Organisations will be able to submit an application to deliver DDRS courses at any time. Applicants considered suitable to provide courses will be granted course approval. Written feedback will be provided to those not granted course approval. DVSA will consider all applications for course approval based on the published DDRS Course Approval and Quality Assurance Model.

Where the course meets the relevant criteria to be approved, the approval will be granted for a period of up to 7 years, enabling delivery of the approved course in the ‘specified area or areas’ forming part of the application. Successful applicants will have been required to demonstrate their capability to provide sufficient courses for the demand across the entire geographical area for which they are approved; this will be a condition of approval.

Beyond the initial approval it is open to the provider of an approved course to subsequently apply for course approval in another specified area(s), however this will attract a further application fee. Applicants should not assume requests for approval for course provision in another or a different specified area will receive automatic approval. The application requirements referred to above will need to be satisfied for the other or different area(s) requested.

The conduct of approved courses

Attendance at an approved course is dependent on the court making an order to that effect. To assist the courts in referring offenders, course providers might usefully engage with courts and defence lawyers to ensure they are fully briefed on the details of the approved course, including details of locations where courses are held.

The ‘list of approved course providers’ at Annex A to this guidance document shows the current active course providers by specified area, and contains a summary of each provider’s course, locations, course fee and format, together with contact details for the organisation. These Annex A details are published on the GOV UK website for reference by courts, participants and other interested parties.

Course providers are encouraged to build close working relationships with courts in their approval area, in order to maximise the referral of offenders to the DDRS.

This might include:

  • making course information freely available to promote the value of the DDRS to offenders, such as the supply of information leaflets about course availability, fee(s) and location, for the court’s waiting room
  • holding liaison meetings with courts’ representatives
  • offering training to new and existing magistrates, sheriffs and courts’ administrative staff and local solicitors, to promote the value of the scheme in reducing reoffending

Where a course provider receives a court referral, the provider should contact the referred offender as soon as possible. The court referral will include the current address and contact details given to the court during the hearing. Contact should be confirmed (or initiated) as soon as possible after receiving the referral from the sentencing court, to encourage the highest possible rate of course ‘take-up’.

The court sentencing process can be complex for those unfamiliar with it. Therefore in addition to making an initial contact with referred offenders, providers may wish to adopt further pro-active practices to maximise course attendance by sending further letters, emails, texts or other communication to those who have made no contact since their initial referral, in sufficient time to enable the offender to comply with the DDR course completion deadline.

It is advisable to make clear to the offender in the initial contact that courses are normally delivered in English. The communication might also ask if the individual concerned has any special requirements. In order to facilitate access to referred offenders whose first language is not English, and those who have a hearing difficulty, course providers should take reasonable steps, where necessary, to accommodate their requirements. This could include the use of an interpreter or signer.

In providing an interpreter, it is acceptable for the offender to be accompanied by a family relative (over 18 years) to provide translation, however the provider may wish to ensure the interpreter is capable of translating adequately to meet the learning needs of the offender. Some providers have historically used contracted interpreters and it may be possible for providers in general to share these resources.

The presence of an interpreter can, however, be distracting to the rest of a course group. Therefore, to minimise disruption, it is suggested that allowing the use of more than one interpreter per course is likely to be disruptive. Nothing in this guidance prevents a provider enhancing the learning opportunity for participants who do not have English as a first language, where local need requires it, by running a dedicated course in an alternative language, assuming that a suitable trainer, course materials and suitable facilities are available.

Course providers are to verify the identity of course participants to guard against identity fraud. This will include completion of an initial registration form, requiring course participants to provide such details as:

  • their full name and address, including post code
  • date of birth
  • court sentence and, where appropriate, the alcohol level at the time of the offence

These supplied details can be verified during the training delivery against the offender details received from the court.

Providers may also require the production of nationally-recognised documents containing the individual’s signature or photograph such as a passport. In addition, other documentation such as a utility bill, mobile telephone bill or benefits documentation may satisfy the provider. Many course providers require offenders to sign a course register as proof of attendance at each course session.

Where an offender who is offered the DDRS course elects to undertake it in a different area to that in which the sentencing court is located, the court will send details of the offender to the supervising court for that area. It is recognised that a court may not be familiar with DDRS course providers in all parts of the country. Therefore, in order to assist courts in selecting an approved course provider, they should be referred to the Annex A list of approved course provider details which can be found on the GOV UK website.

If, following the issue of a referral order to a course provider, an offender requests to undertake the course in a different specified area not covered by the receiving provider, the course provider need not return the order to the court. In practice, many transfers are arranged between course providers in the best interests of the offender and this is usually acceptable to the courts. In such cases, the original course providers should ensure that the supervising court is notified formally of the change of provider. All course providers and offenders will have access to the Annex A list of approved course provider details to assist when transferring a referral order.

Course fees

The maximum course fee is currently £250 and this includes consideration of payment processing charges such as cheque, direct debit and credit card payments, BACS transfer or instalment payments. It is important to ensure the fee for attending an approved DDRS course is maintained at a level which is affordable for the large majority of offenders. If fees are set too high this may result in a low take up as described on page 23 of the TRL report number 613 and the courts may be unable to refer offenders in sufficient numbers to make courses viable.

It is for the course provider to decide the course fee level (beneath the maximum fee ceiling) to meet their business model. Course providers should make this information publicly available by notifying DVSA of the fees for inclusion in the Annex A list of approved course provider details. The list of approved course providers are encouraged to keep the fee structure as clear as possible, ideally no more than a full fee, a lower rate for concessionary categories, eg people in receipt of benefits, and a discounted early booking fee, where these options are offered.

Course providers may change the level of course fee originally submitted at course approval by giving DVSA 30 calendar days notice of the proposed change.

A course provider may agree to an offender paying the course fee in instalments, rather than in one single payment. However, the fee must be paid in full before the completion of the course and not exceed the maximum fee.

Where payment is taken by instalment, providers may wish to warn offenders before entering into such an agreement that a certificate of course completion may not be issued if there is a failure to make payment for the course in accordance with section 34B (4) RTOA.

Course providers should not take payment, or place offenders on courses, in advance of receiving a referral order from the court or a transferred order from another provider. If an offender contacts a course provider in advance of their court case or immediately after sentencing but before the referral order is received, the course provider is advised to take the full details and contact the sentencing court directly to check if they are in fact the named course provider. No offender should be encouraged to attend a course or to make payment before the referral order is received from the court. For guidance on the transfer of offenders between course providers after sentencing.

Course delivery

There is no prescribed national model for the delivery of a DDRS course and this approach enables providers a degree of flexibility in detail and delivery. A DDRS course syllabus has been developed with stakeholders, building on the DVSA Safe and Responsible Driving Standard (DVSA, 2010) and this will inform the delivery. Although there may be differences in the approach adopted by providers, all courses are required to meet the learning outcomes of the DDRS course syllabus and the standards described in this guide.

As demonstrated in the DDRS Course Approval and Quality Assurance process , the approved DDRS course content will need to demonstrate clear links to the desired outcome of the DDRS syllabus. Providers of approved courses will also be required to satisfy the Secretary of State that delivery of training is to a level of competence consistent with, or comparable to, recognised delivery standards consistent with the course approval.

Offenders attending the course are likely to come from a variety of backgrounds and have different learning styles. Course materials therefore might usefully be presented using a variety of techniques, in consideration of the differing learning styles in seeking to ensure offenders are positively and actively engaged, such as:

  • short talks to convey essential information
  • group discussion and participation
  • self-observation forms/records of behaviour, eg ‘drinks diaries’
  • exercises for individual and group discussion, including role play
  • audio/visual presentations
  • guest speakers, for example subject specialists, magistrates, police, other emergency services, victims of drink-drivers
  • information hand-outs
  • behaviour analysis, assessing performance and setting objectives

Course providers are given the freedom to construct the delivery of their DDRS course to meet the learning outcomes of the DDRS syllabus within the following parameters:

  • not less than 16 hours total tuition time, not including breaks
  • minimum of 3 sessions
  • course sessions to be spread across a period of at least 14 days
  • not less than 4, and not more than 20 participants in any course session
  • best practice being for each course to be facilitated by at least 1 trainer to 15 offenders

Where acute or individual circumstances require an exception to the parameters above; including exceeding the recommended ratio it is necessary to notify DVSA by submitting an exception request in order that it can be recorded for compliance and quality assurance purposes. Details of the exception request process can be found at Annex G.

The delivery of the DDRS course syllabus and the opportunity for offenders to develop knowledge and understanding is best served by the learning taking place in a group environment. It is unlikely the same benefits can accrue from training conducted on a ‘one-to-one’ basis.

Complete courses or individual sessions delivered as a one-to-one intervention are not generally acceptable to the scheme. In addition, and to ensure the participant is not disadvantaged, any ‘catch up’ sessions, whether forming part of a programmed course or created separately to cater for clients who have missed course sessions, should also be based on group learning principles.

DVSA recognises the achievement of the scheme’s outcomes rely to a considerable extent on the knowledge, skill, attitude and behaviour demonstrated by course trainers. DVSA require that all DDRS training staff are suitably qualified or have recognised relevant experience.

DDRS trainers may have been recruited to the role from a variety of backgrounds and learning experiences. Many will have been required to demonstrate competence in other adult learning environments which readily map to the DDRS trainer competence framework, or are currently actively working to build the evidence to achieve a recognised adult learning qualification as outlined in the DDRS course approvals information.

The DfT commissioned Competence Assured Solution (CAS) in 2008 to develop a competence framework for trainers and best practice guidance on the recruitment, training and professional development of training staff. The availability of these documents should enable DDRS course providers to consider best practice in creating more robust systems for recruiting DDRS trainers and ensuring they have the necessary knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours to deliver DDRS courses consistently and effectively.

The CAS trainer guidance documents may be found on GOV UK as follows:

Guidance for DDRS training providers

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Professional skills for delivering the DDRS

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Summary of project deliverables, detailed improvement plans and next steps

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In addition to ensuring the ongoing quality of training staff, course providers will also need to monitor the input by guest speakers to ensure the content and presentation style are appropriate to the aims of the course and align with the course approval. Such elements will also be assessed by DVSA as part of the quality assurance visit. For example, where an external training resource is being engaged, eg Fire Service, Police or Magistrate, the course provider may wish to reassure themselves the training resource has a level of delivery competence consistent with the course approval, as this will form part of the quality assurance assessment. Where the resource does not have recognised qualification or proven experience, the DDRS trainer may find it appropriate to be present throughout the session delivery.

For the purposes of quality assurance, continuous professional development and the promotion and development of the scheme, it may be necessary for an individual not directly involved in the delivery of the course to request attendance in an observational role. DVSA accepts that so long as no offender who is a participant on the course has objected to the presence of the observer, and the permission is freely sought, an observer should be allowed to join the course to carry out that role.

Where a provider wishes to offer a training course commercially to non-offenders based on the approved DDRS course, providers are reminded that they do so outside the statutory scheme, eg for fleet drivers, and no powers contained within the scheme can be relied upon. DVSA would encourage the use of the approved course for the wider development of driver education and the promotion of road safety.

DDRS courses intended for offenders should be restricted to offenders only.

Course providers may make minor changes to the content and delivery methods of approved courses at any time, provided their course remains consistent with the course approval and does not breach the course guidance. Any other changes deemed significant, such as a change in contact time, may not be introduced without prior notice to allow for the course approval alteration to be recorded.

If there is any doubt as to whether prior approval is required for a proposed change to the course, providers should consult DVSA. Course providers should ensure that DSA and, as necessary, the courts they serve, are notified immediately of any changes to course or contact details.

Reporting

DVSA will assess the quality and delivery of the approved course using a combination of existing reporting mechanisms, such as the quarterly and annual DDRS reports in addition to assurance visit reports and other sources of information, eg complaints processes and court referral analysis. It is intended that a condition of course approval is that DVSA must be allowed access to any course session for compliance and quality assurance purposes.

The quarterly performance and financial report to DVSA includes the number of referrals received from the court and the number of offenders successfully completing a DDRS course during the period. It will also include the calculation of the per-capita fee to enable DVSA to collect the appropriate fee from the course provider.

The statutory deadline for reporting the quarterly performance and financial data is no later than 14 days after the close of the relevant quarter. A template for reporting is provided at Annex D.

The submission deadline for annual reports is the end of January following the relevant calendar year. A template for annual reporting is provided at Annex C.

In addition to performance and financial reporting the annual report should also provide a summary of course and trainer evaluation demonstrating the transfer of learning consistent with the evidential requirements submitted at course approval stage.

Cessation of course provision

Where the provider of an approved course is no longer willing or able to accept referrals from the courts in the specified area, they must notify DSA in writing of their intention to surrender their course approval and state the date from which this surrender is to take effect. Other than in exceptional circumstances, the course provider should give 3 months’ notice of their intention to DVSA. This notice period will allow for the orderly completion of any outstanding course commitments, provide sufficient time to inform the courts service, amend documentation and, where appropriate consider course approval applications to deliver DDRS courses in the vacated area.

DVSA will consider applications from providers of existing approved courses who are interested in providing their approved course in the specified area(s) served by the outgoing provider.

The incoming and outgoing provider should be prepared to work with each other to minimise any inconvenience to referred offenders. This may include absorbing any outstanding offender commitments from the outgoing provider as well as its historical records. No referred offender should lose the chance to attend a DDRS course as a result of a provider no longer delivering courses.

There is no specific mechanism in the legislation which enables a course approval to be transferred from one course provider to another. In the case of a surrendered approval, DVSA would expect the existing approval to ‘fall’ and look to the existing course approval network to absorb the referrals. It remains open to a new provider to submit an application for course approval for the vacated area.

Where the surrender of the course approval is immediate and no other provider has current course approval for the vacated area, DSA may offer the vacated area to an existing approved course provider. This will be on a temporary basis in order to prevent a break in provision and loss of opportunity to referred offenders, whilst a formal course approval is sought from interested organisations.

Where the legal status of a course provider changes during the period of approval, the existing approval will cease to be valid and can no longer be used. In such circumstances the new entity should apply for course approval.

The Secretary of State may withdraw DDRS course approval where the course provider breaches a condition of approval, disregards this guidance issued by the Secretary of State, or otherwise fails to meet the required standard.

Where approval is withdrawn as referred to in paragraph 3.40 above, the provider should supply DVSA with details of offenders:

  • awaiting course allocation
  • who are awaiting further communication and/or course confirmation from the provider
  • confirmed on future courses
  • who have partially completed courses
  • who have fully complied with course requirements and not received a certificate of course completion
  • who have failed to respond to communication sent by the provider, or failed to attend or complete a course for which a notice of non-completion is required under section 34B(5) and a certificate of course completion has not been issued

A statutory right of appeal to the General Regulatory Chamber of the First-Tier Tribunal exists for those aggrieved by a decision of the Secretary of State to:

  • refuse an application for course approval
  • grant approval for a course subject to conditions
  • withdraw course approval

Further details of the statutory appeal provisions and process are available from DVSA.

Course attendance and completion

Completion of a course, and the consequent reduction in the period of disqualification, will require attendance and completion of the course in accordance with the course provider’s instructions, payment of the appropriate course fee and compliance with the provider’s reasonable requirements section 34B (4) RTOA.

The provider should ensure that each offender has fully completed each course session and is able to provide evidence of attendance, eg by signed course register. Offenders should complete each of the sessions in a logical sequence to progressively build their learning, unless there are wholly exceptional circumstances, such as illness, which make it impossible to do so, and there are no other course options available. This principle also applies to any ‘catch up’ sessions where a part of a course has been missed for any reason.

There is an expectation that course sessions are conducted in an orderly and effective manner, consistent with the order of the court. For clarity, providers might find it useful to issue to offenders a set of clear course terms and conditions, or rules, with which course members are required to comply. A breach of those terms and conditions may render the offender in breach of the course provider’s requirements and so not entitled the offender to a certificate of course completion as provided under section 34B (4) RTOA.

In supporting the learning environment for all offenders, providers should exercise their discretion in the event of a breach of their terms, conditions or rules, by any offender. Unless the matter is a particularly serious incident and requires immediate exclusion, it should be sufficient to issue a first recorded warning to the person concerned about their conduct, but this should not normally lead to exclusion from the session or course.

Under section 34B(4) RTOA a provider must give a certificate of course completion unless the offender fails to pay the due fees, fails to attend the course in accordance with the course provider’s reasonable instructions or fails to comply with any other reasonable requirements of the course provider.

A course provider may wish to consider immediately excluding a person from further course attendance in the event of them being involved in a serious incident such as verbal abuse or an assault or threat of violence to:

  • the provider or staff engaged by the provider
  • a fellow participant on the course
  • venue staff

Any course member found to have driven to or from a course, and thereby having committed the offence of driving while disqualified should be reported to the police.

Where an offender has not been issued with a certificate of course completion, written notice must be issued in accordance with section 34B(5) RTOA. For consistency across the DDRS, this written notice takes the form of a notice of non-completion Annex B.

Where an offender is excluded, and in consequence thereby does not receive a certificate of course completion, a right exists for the offender to apply to the supervising court to challenge the course provider’s decision not to issue such a certificate under section 34B(6) RTOA.

It is advisable, therefore, for providers to keep an accurate written record of attendance, misconduct, and disruptive behaviour, relating to any warnings issued and any exclusion as this may be required as evidence in court proceedings.

Where an offender completes a course satisfactorily, the course provider is required to certify the completion by the issue of a certificate of course completion and give it to the offender no later than 14 days after the latest date for completion of the course section 34B(4) RTOA.

Although not required under the RTOA, it has become good practice for the provider to send the certificate of course completion on the offender’s behalf to the supervising court, copying it to the offender at the same time.

Course providers are responsible for printing and issuing the ‘certificates of course completion’ and ‘notices of non-completion’ These are available at Annex B.

The certificate and notices will be numbered serially to enable identification of the course provider and to whom a certificate of course completion or notice was issued. The form and content of the certificate of course completion are determined by the Secretary of State. No other form of certificate of course completion is recognised by the court.

It is the offender’s responsibility to apply for a new driving licence before the end of the reduced period of disqualification. This is done using form D1 and D750 which are available from post offices or the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA).

Failure to complete a course

Where an offender does not complete a course satisfactorily, the course provider shall notify the offender of his decision in writing as soon as possible and in any event no later than 14 days after the date specified in the order as the latest date for completion of the course section 34B(5) RTOA.

A ‘notice of non-completion’ has been adopted as the formal notice document of good practice and to enable a consistent standard across the scheme. A copy of the notice of non-completion template is at Annex B.

Written notice referred to in the paragraph above shall be issued to an offender who has failed to:

  • pay for the course
  • attend the course in accordance with the course providers’ reasonable instructions
  • comply with any reasonable requirements of the course provider

The notice of non-completion needs to set out the reason for the decision not to issue a certificate of course completion section 34B(10) RTOA and any other circumstances which contributed to the offender failing to complete the course. The notice will draw attention to the offender’s right under section 34B(6) RTOA to make an application against the course provider’s decision.

Issuing a notice of non-completion in these circumstances should avoid the likelihood of a successful default action under section 34B(6) RTOA against the course provider.

Her Majesty’s Court and Tribunal Service (HMCTS) agree that under current legislation the courts have no power to extend the latest date for completion of a DDRS course following sentence.

Where it is clear that a referred offender will be unable to complete a DDRS course with the specified provider before the latest date for completion, it should be explained to the offender in clear terms that no extension in the deadline date is possible and that the provider will be obliged to issue a notice of non-completion.

This may be avoided if it is possible to arrange for another course provider to provide a course which can be completed by the deadline date without breaching other course requirements. In such circumstances, the sentencing court should be informed of the transfer and the reasons for it.

Notices of non-completion must be sent to each offender who fails to satisfactorily complete the course by the deadline (relevant) date specified in the order, even where there has been no communication from the offender.

Course providers should obtain a certificate of posting for each notice of non-completion that they issue in order that the notice is treated as having been given. This can be in the form of a bulk certificate of posting provided that the name and address of each intended recipient is shown and the date of despatch.

The postal carrier’s endorsement of the certificate is required and the course provider might find it useful to keep the certificate as evidence in the event that an offender claims that a notice of non-completion was not issued.

There is no requirement to copy notices of non-completion to DVLA or to the supervising court as the offender will by default, be required to complete the full period of disqualification imposed during sentencing. However if the court wishes to receive them, copies of the notices of non-completion can be sent to the court by first or second class post.

Complaints and appeals

To assist in the management of complaints made by offenders, course providers should ensure offenders have access to information about the course provider’s complaints procedure. DVSA will make use of this procedure in the first instance in the case of a complaint being made direct to the agency, unless it is inappropriate to do so.

Since an offender may challenge a decision not to issue a certificate of completion it is in the interests of each course provider to be able to show to a court that their reasons for not granting a certificate were properly founded on one or more of the matters set out in above.

Special needs and reasonable adjustments

Course providers are reminded of the obligations under The Equality Act 2010 so as to avoid discrimination against those with disabilities in the provision of approved DDRS courses. In particular, under this legislation ‘service providers’ must make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to remove any barriers that could make it difficult or impossible for people with a disability to access their services. Under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) it is unlawful to treat people with a disability less favourably than others for a reason related to their disability.

The duty to make reasonable adjustments is not unqualified. Course providers should establish whether, in any particular case, they are obliged to make adjustments to assist a referred offender, and what adjustments are reasonable taking into account all the relevant circumstances. Course providers may choose to make adjustments beyond those required by the DDA.

Ultimately, it is for the courts to interpret the law in any dispute over the meaning of a particular legislative provision, and in this case what is ‘reasonable’ in consideration of what adjustments may be necessary. There are, however, a number of sources of advice available to course providers to assist them in reaching an equitable conclusion in each case. Much of this is available from the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

Other statutory obligations

Providers are reminded of their duty of care requirements for offenders attending their courses and are expected to meet their statutory obligations. Course providers are also reminded they have a legal obligation in delivering an approved DDRS course to comply at all times with relevant areas of law applying to their organisation and its activities.

DVSA may withdraw a course approval if breaches of the course provider’s legal obligations are brought to the attention of DVSA, indicating that the provider has ceased to be an appropriate person to provide the course and administer its provision efficiently or effectively.

The role of the courts

Making of referral orders

Courts have powers to make a referral order where an offender is disqualified for 12 months or more on conviction of one of the following offences under the RTA 1988:

  • causing death by careless driving under the influence of drink (section 3A)
  • driving or being in charge of a vehicle when under the influence of drink (section 4)
  • driving or being in charge of a motor vehicle with excess alcohol (section 5)
  • failing to provide a specimen for analysis (section 3A or 7) or to allow a specimen to be tested (section 7A)

The DDRS course is not an ‘approved course’ for those convicted of drug-driving offences only. It is, however, acceptable to refer an individual to an approved DDRS course if he or she had committed an offence involving both drink and drugs. Such an offender could usefully benefit from drink-drive education.

There is no legal bar to offenders being referred on a second occasion to an approved DDRS course. This is a matter for the sentencing court. In England the Magistrates’ Courts Sentencing Guidelines (2008 p.186) state that courts should consider offering the opportunity to attend a course to all offenders convicted of a relevant offence for the first occasion. The court should be willing to consider a further opportunity on a second occasion - it will not usually be appropriate to give an offender the opportunity to attend a third course.

Where an offender is disqualified from driving for a relevant drink offence for a period of at least 12 months, the court may make an order that the period of disqualification shall be reduced if, by the ‘relevant date’, the offender satisfactorily completes an approved DDRS course section 34A RTOA.

The ‘relevant date’ means a date at least 2 months before the last day of the period of disqualification as reduced by the order section 34A (6) RTOA.

The provision of the 2 month period referred to above is necessary for the course completion to be notified to the court, and in turn to the DVLA, so that the reduced period of disqualification can be applied to the driver’s record. For example, a 12 month disqualification, with a 3 month reduction for completion of a DDRS course, enables a reduced period of disqualification to 9 months. Section 34A (6) RTOA requires that an additional 2 months be subtracted from the reduced period (9 – 2 months) giving a ‘relevant date’ for completion as 7 months after the date of conviction.

An order referring an offender to an approved DDRS course will be made at the time of sentencing only and recorded in full in the court register (the court minutes in Scotland). No provision exists in the RTOA for the offender to return to court following the original sentencing to apply for the DDRS course. Nor is there power in the RTOA to extend an existing deadline where the offender has, or is likely to, fail to complete the course before the latest date for completion announced at court during sentencing.

Offenders may only be referred to a DDRS course approved by the Secretary of State section 34A(5) RTOA.

Under section 34A(9) RTOA, before the court makes an order, it is required to ensure that:

  • a place is available on an approved course
  • the offender appears to be of, or over, 17 years of age (referral can be by adult or youth courts)
  • the court has informed the offender (orally, or in writing, and in ordinary language) of the effect of the order, and of the amount of fees the offender is required to pay for the course, and when they must be paid
  • the offender has agreed that the order should be made

Where an offender appeals to the crown court (or an appeal court in Scotland) against the sentence, the court will reconsider the sentence and the order for referral to an approved course. The crown court (or appeal court) will have regard to the effect that any variation of the sentence may have on the validity or appropriateness of the course and the reduction in the period of disqualification allowed on successful completion of the course.

As in the magistrates’ court (or sheriff’s court in Scotland), the exact period of reduction decided upon should be specified in court. An order for referral to an approved course may be made in the crown court (or appeal court) even when no such order has been made in the magistrates’ court. If the crown court (or appeal court) reduces the disqualification period or overturns the conviction, it should inform the course provider and the supervising court accordingly.

It is commonplace for legal advisors and court ushers to assist an offender by providing further information, particularly where the sentencing court’s area is served by several providers, or where the offender requires a course provider in another area. DVSA maintains an up-to-date list of active approved DDRS course providers, Annex A which are on the GOV UK website.

In addition to the course and its completion deadline, courts are asked to include, on the courts ‘Libra’ form the offender’s alcohol reading and details of penalties imposed as these are helpful in checking against identity fraud. Courts are encouraged to use the Criminal Justice Secure Mail (CJSM) email system to forward referrals to DDRS providers.

Once a referral order has been made, it is important that the offender and the course provider are notified in writing without delay. Courts are not encouraged to batch referral orders and forward periodically. Any significant delay will reduce the time the offender has available to attend and complete the course by the court deadline.

Delays may also restrict the course options the provider is able to offer the offender. Where different from the sentencing court, the supervising court should also be notified of a course referral. There is no need for a referral order to be copied to DVLA.

Note: ‘Supervising court’ as defined in section 34C (3) RTOA means ‘in England and Wales, if the crown court made the order the Crown Court and otherwise a magistrate’ court acting for the same local justice area as the court which made the order, and (b) in Scotland, the court which made the order.’

When referring the offender, court staff are requested to specify on the referral order whether the offender has any identified special needs identified during the hearing, for example accessibility requirements or where an interpreter has been used in the case, this will ensure suitable arrangements can be made to enable full engagement on the DDRS course.

Since December 2008, courts throughout England have been able to generate course referral notifications through the courts’ information system ‘Libra’. Within Libra, courts should use the following documents:

  • notice of disqualification from driving/endorsement of licence (DRVORD)
  • notice about reduction in disqualification (RDNOTD)
  • notice to course manager (RDNOT)
  • notice to supervising court (RDNOTOC)

The resulting process in Libra will also trigger electronic notification of the disqualification to DVLA and to the police and the Police National Computer (PNC). However, Libra is not designed to record or transmit any updates after the initial result, such as a subsequent reduction in the disqualification period following successful course completion.

The courts’ information system in Scotland, ‘COP II’, currently has no equivalent documents for notification of course referrals. All referrals are therefore notified by the issue of a court order in paper form. Courts should ensure that copies are sent to the offender and course provider at the earliest possible opportunity, in order to maximise the opportunity for the offender to attend a suitable course.

Although made at the time of sentencing, referral to the DDRS is voluntary and an offender may undertake a course at any time, providing it is completed by the completion date. It may be advisable for courts and course providers to take active steps to encourage offenders to undertake courses at an early opportunity, in case unforeseen circumstances endanger course completion before the deadline section 34A (5) RTOA.

Where an offender who is offered the DDRS course elects to undertake it in a different area to that in which the sentencing court is located, the court will send details of the offender to the supervising court for that area. Courts should use Libra document RDNOTOC (notice to supervising court) for this purpose.

There is no separate or additional penalty imposed if an offender agrees to accept a referral order at the time of sentencing and subsequently declines to attend, or is unable to attend a course. In such a case the offender will not receive a certificate of course completion, and will not be entitled to a reduced disqualification period.

The DDRS provider is required to give written notice to the offender of the decision not to issue a certificate of course completion as soon as possible and in any event not later than 14 days after the date specified in the order as the latest date for completion of the course section 34B(5) RTOA. This written notice has been standardised as the ‘notice of non-completion’ recognised across the scheme see Annex B.

High Risk Offenders (HRO) who were referred to an approved course (and whether or not they completed it) are required to satisfy the Secretary of State that they do not have an ‘alcohol problem’, and are fit to drive, before their licence is reissued. This includes submitting to a medical examination by a DVLA approved medical practitioner. Course providers should be prepared to give guidance to those identified by the court as HRO.

Note: High Risk Offenders - Specified in regulation 74 of the Motor Vehicles (Driving Licences) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999 No. 2864): persons disqualified from driving for being two and half times or more over the prescribed limit; for failing without reasonable excuse to provide a specimen for analysis; or for being unfit to drive through drink or driving with an alcohol concentration above the prescribed limit on 2 or more occasions within 10 years.

The National Probation Service in England and Wales currently offers, in some areas only, an intensive supervised programme entitled ‘Drink Impaired Driver’ (DID). This workshop for drink-drive offenders is run over several weeks, attendance at which can be made a condition of a community-based sentence, where the nature of the offence is thought to require a higher degree of intervention.

There is no available reduction in the period of driving disqualification for satisfactory completion of a DID course, as it is not within the DDRS. However, attending a DID course does not prevent a court additionally referring an offender to an approved DDRS course, completion of which would result in a reduction in the period of disqualification.

Subsequent applications to the court by an offender

Where the offender wishes to challenge a decision not to issue a certificate of completion, a statutory option exists. An application may be made to the supervising court by the offender under section 34B(6) RTOA for a declaration against a course provider’s decision not to issue a certificate of completion. The court may issue a summons directing the course provider to attend a hearing to consider the application and the applicant should also be informed of the date of hearing by the court.

In England and Scotland any such application must be made in accordance with court rules. The court will endeavour to ensure that any application is considered promptly so that, if it decides to grant the application, a reduced period of disqualification can still take effect.

If a course provider fails to give either a certificate of completion or a notice of non-completion to the offender within 14 days of the latest date for the completion of a course specified in the order the offender may apply to the supervising court for a declaration that the course provider is in default section 34B (8) RTOA. If the court grants the application, the reduced period of disqualification will apply as if a certificate of course completion had been received by the court section 34B(9) RTOA.

In Scotland the court procedures for applications, such as those under sections 34B(6) and (8) RTOA, are laid down in the relevant rules of court, namely the Act of Adjournal (Criminal Procedure Rules) 1996. The procedure is flexible, but the course provider may be required to lodge written answers to the application before a date for hearing the application is fixed. The period in which any application may be made is 28 days as laid down in the Act of Adjournal.

Where the court has made a decision in the applicant’s favour and orders a reduction in the period of disqualification, and in any case where the disqualification was suspended, it must notify DVLA of its decision under section 34B(11) RTOA. This notification should be made on the same form as for the notification of a reduced period of disqualification following completion of a course and should at the same time be copied to the local PNC bureau.

Appeal by a course provider

A course provider has a right to appeal to the First-Tier Tribunal if aggrieved over the Secretary of State’s refusal to grant course approval, grant of approval subject to condition or withdrawal of course approval.

More information

Contact DVSA if you have any questions about this guidance.

Drink-drive rehabilitation scheme

Drink-drive rehabilitation
Post Test Operations
Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency
The Axis Building
112 Upper Parliament Street

Nottingham
NG1 6LP

Find DDRS training providers

Annex A: list of approved course providers

Annex A: list of approved course providers

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Annex B: certificate of completion and notice of non-completion

Annex B: certificate of completion

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Annex B: notice of non-completion

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Annex C: annual reporting template

Annex C: annual reporting template

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Annex D: DDRS statistics quarterly returns

Annex D: DDRS statistics quarterly returns

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Annex D: DDRS per capita quarterly template

Annex D: DDRS per capita quarterly template

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Annex D: DDRS course schedule template

Annex D: DDRS course schedule template

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Annex E: a schematic for courts

Annex E: a schematic for courts

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Annex F: National Protocol agreement for the Drink Drive Rehabilitation scheme

Annex F: National protocol agreement for Drink Drive Rehabilitation scheme

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Annex G: Exception request process

Annex G: Exception request process

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Annex G: Exception request process

Annex G: Exception request template

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January 05, 2015 03:17 PM

January 04, 2015

ODF Wikipedia Page

2.49.239.30: /* Software */

Software

← Previous revision Revision as of 16:40, 4 January 2015
Line 169: Line 169:
 
*[[LibreOffice]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[LibreOffice]]<ref name="register" />
 
*Microsoft Office 2003 and Office XP (with the Open Source OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://odf-converter.sourceforge.net/download.html#hRequirements|title=OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-ins for Office|accessdate={{Date|2014-01-31}}}}</ref>
 
*Microsoft Office 2003 and Office XP (with the Open Source OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://odf-converter.sourceforge.net/download.html#hRequirements|title=OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-ins for Office|accessdate={{Date|2014-01-31}}}}</ref>
*[[Microsoft Office 2007]] (from service pack 2 release)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/press/2008/may08/05-21ExpandedFormatsPR.mspx|title=Microsoft Expands List of Formats Supported in Microsoft Office|publisher=Microsoft Corporation|date=21 May 2008|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
+
*[[Microsoft Office 2007]] (from service pack 2 release) supports ODF 1.1 <ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/press/2008/may08/05-21ExpandedFormatsPR.mspx|title=Microsoft Expands List of Formats Supported in Microsoft Office|publisher=Microsoft Corporation|date=21 May 2008|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
*[[Microsoft Office 2010]]
+
*[[Microsoft Office 2010]] supports ODF 1.1
*[[Microsoft Office 2013]]
+
*[[Microsoft Office 2013]] supports ODF 1.2
 
*[[Microsoft OneDrive]] / [[Office Web Apps]]<ref>{{cite web|last=Foley |first=Mary Jo |url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-adds-odf-support-url-shortening-to-its-skydrive-storage-service/12480 |title=Microsoft adds ODF support, URL shortening to its SkyDrive storage service |publisher=ZDNet |date=17 April 2012 |accessdate=13 August 2012}}</ref>
 
*[[Microsoft OneDrive]] / [[Office Web Apps]]<ref>{{cite web|last=Foley |first=Mary Jo |url=http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-adds-odf-support-url-shortening-to-its-skydrive-storage-service/12480 |title=Microsoft adds ODF support, URL shortening to its SkyDrive storage service |publisher=ZDNet |date=17 April 2012 |accessdate=13 August 2012}}</ref>
 
*[[NeoOffice]]
 
*[[NeoOffice]]

by 2.49.239.30 at January 04, 2015 04:40 PM

December 31, 2014

Apache Foundation

Apache OpenOffice in 2014: a year in review

2014 has been an exciting year for the OpenOffice project and community.

Click on the picture below to start a slideshow with highlights from 2014. A text-only version is under the picture.


  • January: The Apache OpenOffice community starts the year by adding new localizations.
    OpenOffice supports 120+ languages, but only those that are 100% translated and maintained are officially released.The 100% complete localizations in 2014 doubled the ones from 2012.
    OpenOffice also participated, as usual, in the initiatives for UNESCO's International Mother Language Day in February.
  • February: OpenOffice comes back to FOSDEM, one of the most popular Free and Open Source Conferences in Europe, with a devroom and a dedicated stand.
    For the first year, the devroom is open to all ODF Editors.
  • March: the Apache OpenOffice community prepares for ApacheCon Denver (7-11 April) by designing a dedicated track.
    Selected topics include: work toward a new translation workflow and a new build system, Open Source marketing and security testing.
  • April: Apache OpenOffice 4.1.0 is released, with much improved accessibility, support for comments on text ranges, a new interface for editing input fields and many improvements in handling of graphics.
    Hundreds of community members participate in testing, with dedicated tests by accessibility experts.
    The code, distributed under the Apache License 2.0, is promptly reused by other projects.
  • May: Apache OpenOffice downloads hit the 100 million mark in less than 2 years.
    By the end of 2014, downloads are more than 130 millions, from virtually all countries and territories in the world.
  • June: A new initiative allows to quickly and easily localize the OpenOffice website. New translations like Lithuanian and Hebrew are published and updated.
    Website translations are made more visibile using a language dropdown and browser-based language negotiation.
  • July: The social media presence of Apache OpenOffice grows.
    The Facebook fan page at https://facebook.com/ApacheOO grows more than 30% from 2013, to 13,000 fans.
    The official Twitter account at https://twitter.com/apacheoo has more than 3,500 followers, with a 75% increase over the previous year.
  • August: Apache OpenOffice 4.1.1 is released, with several important bugfixes, full support for three additional languages, security improvements and support for gestures under Mac OS X.
  • September: The Apache OpenOffice Forum and Wiki receive hardware upgrades by the Apache Infra team to be able to sustain the ever-growing traffic.
    The official forum at https://forum.openoffice.org is the most used channel for user support, averaging over 100 posts per day and accumulating 320,000 posts about Apache OpenOffice and all derivatives.
  • October: A community survey is launched to understand how we can better exploit the potential of our several hundreds contributors. Results will set the priorities for community development in future.
    The user community continues to grow thanks to increased adoption, with Udine (Italy) joining the long list of public administrations that migrated to OpenOffice.
  • November: Apache OpenOffice has a strong presence at ApacheCon Europe, held in Budapest. A dedicated track is the occasion to reason about upcoming developments, our community, migration, integration with mobile technologies and web projects.
  • December: Thanks to the work of Apache Infra and investments from the Apache Foundation, Apache OpenOffice has technology available to sign its releases in a way compatible with Windows security settings, thus allowing also non-technical users to immediately verify that they downloaded the genuine version of OpenOffice and confirming the continued commitment from Apache and OpenOffice to protect users.
    The new digital signing will be available in the next OpenOffice releases.

Have a nice 2015!

by pescetti at December 31, 2014 06:50 PM

December 30, 2014

Apache Foundation

Presentations and videos from ApacheCon EU 2014, Budapest

ApacheCon Europe, held last month in Budapest, was a wonderful occasion for the OpenOffice community to gather and discuss the state of the project and future developments.

Videos and presentations from the conference are now available. See below for some presentations from the OpenOffice track.

Pictures are available too, courtesy of Michal Hrin.

OpenOffice At Apache: 2014 And Beyond - Andrea Pescetti, Apache OpenOffice PMC

It's already two years since OpenOffice graduated as a Top Level Project at Apache. We have more than 100 million downloads and a stable, working community at Apache. In an overall "state of the project" talk, we will see what we accomplished so far, what worked, what can be improved... Full Description - Slides

Doing The Write Thing: Document Editing Made Mobile (the Corinthia Project) - Louis Suárez-Potts, Age of Peers, Inc. & Peter Kelly, UX Productivity

At the Denver ApacheCon last April, I presented on the evolution of OpenOffice, and the need for a good quality, compatible solution for mobile devices. Participants suggested establishing a project in Apache Labs to address this problem... Full Description - Video - Slides

Anatomy Of An Apache OpenOffice Extension - Pedro Giffuni, Apache Software Foundation

Developing code within the huge, and sometimes daunting, Apache OpenOffice code can sometimes be very difficult, specially if you only want to add a very specific piece of code that few people want. As part of an ongoing effort to improve the Operation Research capabilities within Apache OpenOffice, I will try to document the different parts of an Apache OpenOffice extension... Full Description - Slides

How to Turn Your Favorite Programming Language Into An AOO Macro Language - Rony Flatscher, WU Vienna

Apache OpenOffice (AOO) defines a scripting framework that can be exploited to add any programming language to Apache OpenOffice as a macro language. This presentation introduces the necessary overview and knowhow to become able to assess the effort to add your own favorite programming language to AOO... Full Description - Slides

The OpenOffice Localization Community - Andrea Pescetti, Apache OpenOffice PMC

The sun never sets on the OpenOffice localization community. Volunteers from all continents help translating OpenOffice, its documentation and its website into dozens of languages... Full Description - Slides

Addressing File Format Compatibility in Word Processors - Louis Suárez-Potts, Age of Peers, Inc. & Peter Kelly, UX Productivity

A well-known XKCD comic parodies the industry's solution to standards proliferation: a new, "universal" standard to replace all its predecessors. We all know where that leads. In this talk, I'll discuss an alternate approach that deals with the mess without creating more of it, in the context of word processing... Full Description - Video - Slides

The Municipality Of Trieste Apache OpenOffice Migration - Davide Dozza

In 2013 the Municipality of Trieste (Italy) decided to migrate to Apache OpenOffice. The main goal was to adopt ODF as the document standard format for all the 1800 users on about 1550 PCs... Full Description - Slides

Collaborated Editing On ODF - Svante Schubert, OASIS ODF Advanced Collaboration Subcommittee

The OpenDocument format (ODF) consists of compressed XML files. ODF is read and written by many Office applications; the Apache ODF Toolkit (incubating) provides the ability of an easy automated access... Full Description - Slides

by pescetti at December 30, 2014 10:02 AM

December 26, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Security in open source, a Google surprise, and more - opensource.com


Security in open source, a Google surprise, and more
opensource.com
In a recent news roundup, I pointed to an article about Google offering better support for OpenDocument (DOF) formats in its applications. The article mentioned that support would come sometime in 2015, but Google surprised the world and added ODF ...

and more »

December 26, 2014 12:10 PM

Security in open source, a Google surprise, and more - opensource.com


Security in open source, a Google surprise, and more
opensource.com
In a recent news roundup, I pointed to an article about Google offering better support for OpenDocument (DOF) formats in its applications. The article mentioned that support would come sometime in 2015, but Google surprised the world and added ODF ...

and more »

December 26, 2014 12:10 PM

December 21, 2014

Charles H. Schulz

Public Interest, Software Freedom and Open Standards

Christmas and the New Year are coming really close now and I would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. This year was truly exciting for me and I believe that 2015 is going to be a very special one. One of the things that keep coming back and that many of us enjoy during this time of the year is the Christmas cookies, candies and other very nice surprises that we are being offered, or that we bake or purchase. Let’s forget the extra pounds that’s part of the season’s inexorable consequences: this year, we had some another kind of early Christmas delights: Early December, the UK Government hosted the tenth edition of the ODF plugfest. All the participants went away saying it had been a tremendous success; the Document Foundation, its partners and the ODF ecosystem at large attended the event. Above all, there were two very good surprises during the event:ODF-logo

  • Google is now back at work on seriously implementing the ODF standard for Google Drive. This is major as Google Drive has the potential to become one of the major ODF implementations available. So far, its support for ODF had been hesitant or ambiguous, when not downright technically flawed. We are not being told that Google is committed to have a full, quality implementation of ODF for Google Drive and perhaps for its search engine for the Summer season of 2015. This kind of announcement does not happen everyday and I believe it will give a boost to the ODF ecosystem by extending its potential reach to millions of new users.
  • The efforts of the UK Government in adopting Free Software and Open Standards are real, actual, and not the effect of some politics-induced buzz. The UK is moving on several fronts, adopting Free Software on the desktop, the server (this is a huge undertaking obviously), creating and liberating a UK_Sealsubstantial amount of open data, and ensuring its infrastructure and services rely on open standards. It is useful to remember that such migrations are usually hard to lead to completion because of the complexity of the legacy systems and the habits of entire public sector entities interwoven with existing skills and suppliers’ relations. If properly carried on, this migration and the new policies born out of it will be of tremendous importance for any other government contemplating such a move. On the other hand, I cannot stress enough the importance of working with upstream projects and initiatives for a government like the UK Government. As I wrote a few months ago, we should expect technical problems and change management issues that must be addressed properly, otherwise the whole migration project could be at risk of failing. Upstream projects, such as the Document Foundation, can help by providing guidance on sourcing the best expertise, and important technological questions. These projects may in turn be helped through the investment of governments: more resources also mean more quality assurance, and features developed for the benefit of all. Public interest and software freedom are not always aligned, in the sense that software freedom grant rights to users of Free Software but does not imply users will get what they want; in this case however, these two notions could become very much aligned. The same holds true for Open Standards: if major chunks of the UK’s public sector’s pool of documents is migrated to ODF, there is something close to a liability – and an opportunity- for this Government to ensure the format continues to thrive and be improved.

All in all, we have some really good news for the end of the year. I look forward to 2015.

Cheers!

by Charles at December 21, 2014 02:51 PM

December 20, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Open source or proprietary PaaS: Which is better for your organization? - TechRepublic


Open source or proprietary PaaS: Which is better for your organization?
TechRepublic
Other databases that you can open include Oracle JDBC, MySQL, and PostgreSQL. The only database you can create with Base must be in OpenDocument File (ODF) format. To help you decide what type of database you should use with an open or closed ...

December 20, 2014 12:59 AM

December 18, 2014

Planet KDE

Leaving KO

Inge, Tobias and I founded KO GmbH in 2007 in Magdeburg. We named it KOfficeSource, because we believed that KOffice, which is Calligra these days, was getting ready for the big time, especially on mobile. Nokia was beginning to invest heavily into open source, Intel joining in with Moblin, the times were heady and exciting! After a bit of rough-and-tumble about the name, we renamed KOfficeSource GmbH to KO GmbH and from 2010 on, we were in business!

For a couple of years we had a great time. We ported Calligra to Maemo, Meego, Sailfish and Windows. We created half a dozen mobile versions of the core Calligra applications: viewers, editors. Along the way, we found some other customers, next to Nokia and Intel: NLNet helped with the port to Windows, SKF used Calligra in their Orpheus ball-bearing modeling tool as the report-writing component, ROSA was getting interested in the WebODF technology we had developed together with NLNet.

Our customers were happy: we really delivered amazing technology, applications with a great user experience, were good at working together with other teams and, well, basically, we always delivered. Whether it was C++, Python or Javascript, Qt, QML or HTML5.

Then things began to go awry. Even after dropping Meego, Nokia was still a customer of ours for some time, but we were doing prototype stuff in j2me for Asha phones. Not really exciting! ROSA went broke. We lost SKF as a customer when they had to reorganize to turn their development process around. Other customers had to cut down -- and we were also basically a bunch of tech nerds with no idea about doing sales: until now we never had to do sales.

Which meant that we failed to build enough of a business to sustain ourselves. We tried to expand, with Krita being an obvious choice for a mature product. But that still needed sales, and we failed at that, too.

So, from January on, I'll be no longer with KO GmbH. The Krita Foundation has taken over Krita on Steam and the support for the Krita Studio customers. We'll first release Krita 2.9, which is going to be awesome! And then, I'll be looking for work again, as a project lead or developer, freelance or with a company, on Krita or something else altogether.

by Boudewijn Rempt (boud) at December 18, 2014 10:01 AM

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Bedre ODF-støtte i Google Drive - digi.no


digi.no

Bedre ODF-støtte i Google Drive
digi.no
Til tross for mye fokus på åpen kildekode og åpne formater, så har ikke Googles nettskybaserte dokumentapplikasjoner hatt særlig god støtte for Open Document Format (ODF), som er standardformatet i blant annet OpenOffice. Blant annet har støtten for ...

December 18, 2014 09:23 AM

Google Drive: Cloud-Dienst unterstützt jetzt auch das ODF-Format - netzwelt.de


netzwelt.de

Google Drive: Cloud-Dienst unterstützt jetzt auch das ODF-Format
netzwelt.de
Überdies ist es möglich, Texte und Tabellen im ODF-Format aus Google Drive zu exportieren. Für Präsentationsdateien steht diese Option noch aus. Darüber hinaus bietet Google Drive nun auch Unterstützung für verbundene Zellen in Tabellendokumenten ...
Google erweitert Drive um ODF-SupportZDNet.de
Google bringt offizielle ODF-Unterstützung für DriveIT Magazine
Google Drive unterstützt fortan auch ODFKioskea
derStandard.at -WinFuture
all 14 news articles »

December 18, 2014 09:15 AM

December 17, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Google досрочно запустил поддержку Open Document Format в Google Drive - Nixp.Ru


Google досрочно запустил поддержку Open Document Format в Google Drive
Nixp.Ru
Согласно сообщению в Google+ — Google Drive теперь поддерживает открытые форматы ODF. Пользователи могут редактировать текстовый формат (.odt), таблицы (.ods) и презентации (.odp). Ранее в Google Drive поддержка ODF была на ...

December 17, 2014 08:46 PM

Google Drive: Online-Office bekommt ODF-Support - CHIP Online


PC-Welt

Google Drive: Online-Office bekommt ODF-Support
CHIP Online
Gänzlich neu ist die Unterstützung von ODF nicht; Textdokumente und Tabellen ließen sich bereits in der Vergangenheit mit Google Drive bearbeiten. Dabei gab es jedoch teils erhebliche Kompatibilitätsprobleme, die nun nicht mehr auftreten sollen.
Google Docs unterstützt freies OpenDocument FormatderStandard.at
Google Drive bekommt ODF-Support und Sprachsuche für AndroidPC-Welt
Google Drive unterstützt nun offiziell den OpenDocument-ImportWinFuture
IT Magazine
all 10 news articles »

December 17, 2014 08:40 PM

Google Drive importiert mehr ODF-Dateien - Heise Newsticker


PC Games

Google Drive importiert mehr ODF-Dateien
Heise Newsticker
In erster Linie dürfte Google mit dieser Ergänzung der Tatsache Rechnung tragen, dass Dateien in einem ODF-Format inzwischen eine Anforderung vieler Beschaffungsprojekte auch von öffentlichen Einrichtungen sind, beispielsweise in Frankreich, ...
Google Docs unterstützt freies OpenDocument FormatderStandard.at
Google Drive unterstützt nun offiziell den OpenDocument-ImportWinFuture

all 7 news articles »

December 17, 2014 12:16 PM

Google Drive importiert mehr ODF-Dateien - Mac & i


Google Drive importiert mehr ODF-Dateien
Mac & i
In erster Linie dürfte Google mit dieser Ergänzung der Tatsache Rechnung tragen, dass Dateien in einem ODF-Format inzwischen eine Anforderung vieler Beschaffungsprojekte auch von öffentlichen Einrichtungen sind, beispielsweise in Frankreich, ...

December 17, 2014 12:16 PM

Google Drive adds ODF support, voice search for Android, and app uploads for ... - ZDNet


​Google Drive adds ODF support, voice search for Android, and app uploads for ...
ZDNet
First up, Google has added support for three main ODF file formats. The update may give Google a better chance of bidding for work with organisations like the UK government, which from July required all office suites to support ODF, the format used by ...

and more »

December 17, 2014 11:53 AM

Google Docs unterstützt freies OpenDocument Format - derStandard.at


PC Games

Google Docs unterstützt freies OpenDocument Format
derStandard.at
Zwar war es bisher schon möglich zum Teil entsprechende Dokumente bei Google Docs zu importieren, die Kompatibilität ließ aber einiges zu wünschen übrig. Nun wird ODF 1.2 vollständig unterstützt, der Support für das ODP-Format für Präsentationen ist ...
Google Drive: Online-Office bekommt ODF-SupportCHIP Online
Google Drive unterstützt nun offiziell den OpenDocument-ImportWinFuture

all 8 news articles »

December 17, 2014 11:34 AM

Google Docs umí otevírat a převádět dokumenty ODF - Živě.cz


Google Docs umí otevírat a převádět dokumenty ODF
Živě.cz
Webová kancelář od Googlu si nově poradí i s dokumenty z rodiny ODF – Open Document Format. Ty používají především kancelářské balíky LibreOffice a OpenOffice. Google Docs je nyní umí otevřít a převést do svého nativního formátu. Podpora se týká jak ...

and more »

December 17, 2014 10:17 AM

December 16, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Google Opens Up Drive File Support By Adding ODF File Importing - Android Headlines - Android News


Google Opens Up Drive File Support By Adding ODF File Importing
Android Headlines - Android News
The new features include support for importing all three of the major ODF file formats, for files created within programs like Open Office for example. If you use Drive, you can import .odt files for documents, .ods files for spreadsheets, and .odp ...
Google's surprise: ODF support launches ahead of scheduleInfoWorld

all 4 news articles »

December 16, 2014 10:00 PM

Google's surprise: ODF support launches ahead of schedule - InfoWorld


Google's surprise: ODF support launches ahead of schedule
InfoWorld
Change tracking information, annotations, and other metadata gets lost in the import process and doesn't get exported, so for both companies, ODF is seen as a migration format rather than as a working format. That will have to change, because there's ...
Google Opens Up Drive File Support By Adding ODF File ImportingAndroid Headlines - Android News

all 4 news articles »

December 16, 2014 08:50 PM

December 15, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Google Promises Better Compatibility with Open Source Documents - The VAR Guy


Google Promises Better Compatibility with Open Source Documents
The VAR Guy
Google (GOOG) may soon be taking open OpenDocumentFormat (ODF), the native file format in virtually all modern open source word processors, like LibreOffice and OpenOffice, more seriously. That's according to a statement from Google's open source ...

December 15, 2014 12:53 AM

December 14, 2014

Planet KDE

Calligra 2.9 Beta Released

We’re pleased to present you the first beta release in 2.9 series of Calligra Suite for testing! We will focus on fixing issues including those that you’d report. All thus to make the final release of 2.9 expected in January 2015 as stable as possible!

When you update many improvements and a few new features will be installed, mostly in Kexi and Krita as well as general ones. Finally in 2.9 a new app, Calligra Gemini, appears. Read below to see why it may be of interest to you.

New Features and Improvements in This Release

New Integration: Displaying office documents in Okular

Calligra document plugin for Okular

Calligra document plugin for Okular showing a DOC file

A new plugin for Okular, KDE’s universal document viewer, enables Okular to use the Calligra office engine for displaying documents in the formats OpenDocument Text (ODT), MS Word (DOC, DOCX) and WordPerfect (WPD). It supplements the existing plugin from Calligra that gives Okular ability to display OpenDocument Presentation (ODP) and MS Powerpoint (PPT, PPTX) formats.

The Calligra office engine has been used for the default document viewers on the smartphones Nokia N9 and Jolla, the Android app COffice, and other mobile editions of Calligra. So it makes sense to also use the Calligra office engine for the document reader from KDE, coming with a UI designed for document consumption for people who want to read, but not edit office documents.

New application: Calligra Gemini

Text document edited on laptop computerThe same text document in tablet mode

The same text document edited on laptop computer and in tablet mode

Calligra Gemini debuts in 2.9, a novel application encasing word processor and presentation Calligra components can function both as a traditional desktop application used with a mouse and keyboard, and transform into a touch friendly application on the go. This changes the experience to one suitable for all-touch devices without the inconvenience of having to switch to a separate application.

Read more about story behind the app.

Kexi – Visual Database Applications Builder

Many usability improvements and bug fixes. Forms have finally been ported from Qt 3 to Qt 4.

  • General:
    • New: Simplify and automatize bug reporting; OS and Platform information is auto-selected on bugs.kde.org.
    • New: Make side panes lighter by removing frames in all styles except Oxygen
    • New: Added “Close all tabs” action to main window tabs.
    • Improve appearance of main tabbed toolbar for GTK+ and Oxygen styles. (bug 341150)
    • Improve handling permission errors on database creation. Do not allow to create a new SQLite-based .kexi file if: non-writable folder is selected, relative path is selected (unsafe), non-file path is selected (perhaps a folder).
    • Do not crash when Kexi is unable to find plugins; display message and exit.
    • Fix right-to-left user interface support in side panes.
    • Simplify “Save password” checkbox text in database connection editor and add direct what’s this button.
    • Disable ability of setting left/right sidebars floatable (like in Dolphin, improve stability)
    • Remove redundant ‘find’ action from the main toolbar. It’s already available in local context where it really works.
    • Move the ‘Export data table’ from the main toolbar to a local table and query object’s menu.
    • Improve user-visible messages.
  • Forms:
    • New: Port Kexi Forms to Qt4’s scroll area, a milestone leading to Qt5-based Kexi.
    • Improve translation support in Forms’ action selection dialog
  • Reports:
    • New: Added inline editing for labels in Report Designer.
    • New: Added “Do you want to open exported document?” question when report is exported to a Text/Spreadsheet/as Web Page.
    • Print reports in High DPI (precision). (bug 340598)

Krita – Creative Sketching & Painting App

  • New: Krita can now open multiple images in one window
  • New: Perspective transform
  • New: Liquify transform
  • New: Cage transform
  • New: Selection-shaped gradients
  • New: Several new filters
  • New: A HSV color selector
  • New: It’s now possible to edit the alpha channel separately
  • New: A new feature to split a layer into several layers by color
  • Thin line quality has been improved
  • Anti-aliasing of the transform tool has been improved
  • It’s now much easier to create masks and convert between masks and layers
  • Vector object scaling and resolution has been fixed
  • The smudge brush has been made more correct
  • Steps on the Undo history can now be merged
  • The brush preset system has been improved to make it possible to temporarily lock changes to a preset during a session
  • The G’Mic filter has been updated and there are previews now
  • Missing: Photoshop layer styles and PSD layer masks: we’re working hard on those, but they aren’t done yet. We’re working to have them ready by the end of January. The animation tool has been disabled for refactoring. In Beta 1, Sketch and Gemini have been disabled.

Calligra Words – Word Processor

Layouting has been reworked to fix many small rendering glitches. It is the first required step before more page layouting features can be added as well as dynamic page layout changes.

Try It Out

What’s Next and How to Help?

We’re approaching the era of 2.9 to be released in early 2015. It will be followed by Calligra 3.0 based on new technologies later in 2015.

You can meet us to share your thoughts or offer your support on general Calligra forums or dedicated Kexi or Krita forums. Many improvements are only possible thanks to the fact that we’re working together within the awesome community.

(some Calligra apps need new maintainers, you can become one, it’s fun!)

How and Why to Support Calligra?

Calligra apps may be totally free, but their development is costly. Power, hardware, office space, internet access, travelling for meetings – everything costs. Direct donation is the easiest and fastest way to efficiently support your favourite applications. Everyone, regardless of any degree of involvement can do so. You can choose to:

About Calligra

Calligra Suite is a graphic art and office suite developed by the KDE community. It is available for desktop PCs, tablet computers, and smartphones. It contains applications for word processing, spreadsheets, presentation, databases, vector graphics, and digital painting. See more information at the website http://www.calligra.org.

by Calligra News at December 14, 2014 10:37 AM

December 12, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Making federal data more useful and accessible to fuel media and democracy - Journalist's Resource


Journalist's Resource

Making federal data more useful and accessible to fuel media and democracy
Journalist's Resource
It doesn't have to be in a proprietary format either (.XLS or .XLSX). Why not ODF (an open source format)? CSV files are increasingly standard, which is a good thing. While the latter can only handle data single sheets, they are accessible to all, no ...

December 12, 2014 09:01 PM

Google embraces open doc formats, US Marines choose Linux, and more - opensource.com


Google embraces open doc formats, US Marines choose Linux, and more
opensource.com
The article quotes Chris DiBona, Google's head of open source, who said "support for exporting ODS and ODT files in ODF 1.2 format (the one used by all modern suites including MS Office and LibreOffice) is now under development." A reason for this move ...

and more »

December 12, 2014 12:02 PM

Google embraces open doc formats, US Marines choose Linux, and more - opensource.com


Google embraces open doc formats, US Marines choose Linux, and more
opensource.com
The article quotes Chris DiBona, Google's head of open source, who said "support for exporting ODS and ODT files in ODF 1.2 format (the one used by all modern suites including MS Office and LibreOffice) is now under development." A reason for this move ...

and more »

December 12, 2014 12:02 PM

Planet AbiWord

Alan Horkan: OpenRaster and OpenDocument

OpenRaster is a file format for layered images. The OpenRaster specification is small and relatively easy to understand, essentially each layer is represented by a PNG image, and other information is contained written in XML and it is all contained in a Zip Archive. OpenRaster is inspired by OpenDocument.
OpenDocument is a group of different file formats, including word processing, spreadsheets, and vector drawings. The specification is huge and continues to grow. It cleverly reuses many existing standards, avoiding repeating old mistakes, and building on existing knowledge.

OpenRaster can and should reuse more from OpenDocument.



It is easy to say but putting it into practice is harder. OpenDocument is a huge standard so where to begin? I am not even talking about the OpenDocument Graphics (.odg) specifically but more generally than that. It is best that show it with an example. So I created an example OpenRaster image with some fractal designs. You can unzip this file and see that like a standard OpenRaster file it contains:


fractal.ora  
 ├ mimetype
 ├ stack.xml
 ├ data/
 │  ├ layer0.png
 │  ├ layer1.png
 │  ├ layer2.png
 │  ├ layer3.png
 │  ├ layer4.png
 │  └ layer5.png
 ├ Thumbnails/
 │  └ thumbnail.png
 └ mergedimage.png

It also unusually contains two other files manifest.xml content.xml. Despite the fact that OpenDocument is a huge standard the minimum requirements for a valid OpenDocument file comes down to just a few files. The manifest is a list of all the files contained in the archive, and content.xml is the main body of the file, and does some of the things that stack.xml does in OpenRaster (for the purposes of this example, it does many other things too). The result of these two extra files, a few kilobytes of extra XML, is that the image is both OpenRaster AND OpenDocument "compatible" too. Admittedly it is an extremely small tiny subset of OpenDocument but it allows a small intersection between the two formats. You can test it for yourself, rename the file from .ora .odg and LibreOffice can open the image.

To better demonstrate the point, I wanted to "show it with code!" I decided to modify Pinta (a Paint program written in GTK and C#) and my changes are on GitHub. The relevant file is Pinta/Pinta.Core/ImageFormats/OraFormat.cs which is the OpenRaster importer and exporter.

This is a proof of concept, it is limited and not useful to ordinary users. The point is only to show that OpenRaster could borrow more from OpenDocument. It is a small bit of compatibility that is not important by itself but being part of the larger group could be useful.

December 12, 2014 05:09 AM

December 08, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Is Google coming back to the open community on document formats? - ComputerworldUK


Is Google coming back to the open community on document formats?
ComputerworldUK
Chris DiBona, head of open source at Google, told the PlugFest audience that support for exporting ODS and ODT files in ODF 1.2 format (the one used by all modern suites including MS Office and LibreOffice) is now under development. He also said that ...

December 08, 2014 05:17 PM

UK Government

Supporting page: HMRC Campaigns

Updated: Added info on the Solicitors Tax Campaign.

HMRC runs campaigns that are designed to:

  • help people to bring their tax affairs up to date
  • help them keep them that way, and
  • help stop them getting it wrong in the first place

These campaigns are part of HMRC’s approach to tax compliance.

How they work

We do this by:

  • providing opportunities that make it easier to be compliant – including offering an incentive to self-correct
  • bringing together a basket of activities to encourage voluntary compliance in the target population
  • looking for opportunities to inform customers who are entering the targeted risk area for the first time
  • using what is learned to help HMRC to improve processes to deal more efficiently with customers in the future

What they mean for customers

Our campaigns offer people a chance to get their tax affairs in order on the best possible terms. They provide tools and information to help people do that; to help people keep their affairs in order; and to help stop people getting it wrong in the first place.

Where people choose not to take the chance to set the record straight, we use the information, gathered before and during the campaign, to conduct follow-up work. This includes investigations and prosecutions.

If you think you have unpaid tax that you want to report and pay to us, please contact the Campaigns Voluntary Disclosure Helpline, 8.00 am to 6.30 pm, Monday to Friday, on 0845 601 5041

The results of HMRC campaigns

Since 2007, HMRC campaigns have collected over £596 million in tax from people coming to us, and over £338 million from a large number of follow-up activities. There are a number of criminal investigations underway and eight people have been convicted of cheating the public revenue, with custodial sentences totaling in excess of 10 years handed down and leading to the recovery of £593,000.

Campaign Total Revenue as at 30 Oct 2014
Tax Health Plan £69,323,173
Tax Catch Up Plan £2,948,256
Value Added Tax Outstanding Returns £37,812,885
VAT Initiative £22,271,526
Plumbers Tax Safe Plan £22,166,777
Electricians Tax Safe Plan £15,747,864
E Marketplaces £8,974,292
Direct Selling £495,133
Tax Returns Initiative £86,163,464
My Tax Return Catch Up £32,502,644
Property Sales £7,504,112
Offshore Disclosure Facility £512,190,000
Offshore New Disclosure Opportunity £156,923,070
Campaigns Consequential Disclosures* £5,116,343
Let Property 7,852,753
Health Well Being Tax Plan £809,505
Second Income Update February 2015
TOTAL £988,801,797

*These disclosures are from individuals not targeted by any Campaign who have voluntarily come forward and used the Campaigns disclosure line to tell us about undeclared income.

Current HMRC campaigns

Solicitors Tax Campaign

The Solicitors Tax Campaign gives solicitors working in a partnership or company, or as an individual, the chance to tell HMRC about any income they haven’t declared.

Find out more about HMRC’s Solicitors Tax Campaign, or call the Solicitors Tax Campaign helpline between 8am and 8pm Monday to Friday on 0300 013 4749.

Credit Card Sales Campaign

The Credit Card Sales Campaign is aimed at individuals or businesses that accept credit or debit card payments. It offers them an opportunity to bring their tax affairs up to date.

Find out more about HMRC’s Credit Card Sales Campaign, or call the Credit Card Sales Campaign Hotline between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday on 0300 123 9272.

Second Incomes Campaign

The Second Incomes Campaign offers employees who have not declared additional untaxed income a chance to pay the tax they owe.

Find out more about HMRC’s Second Incomes Campaign, or call the Second Incomes Campaign Hotline between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday on 0300 123 0945.

Let Property Campaign

The Let Property Campaign targets the residential property letting market and offers a chance for landlords in this sector to get up to date or put right any errors they have made and then remain compliant.

Find out more about HMRC’s Let Property Campaign or call the Let Property Campaign Hotline between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday on 03000 514479.

Past HMRC Campaigns

Health and Wellbeing Campaign

The Health and Wellbeing campaign gave professionals working in Health and Wellbeing an opportunity to bring their tax affairs up to date on the best possible terms. This included physiotherapists, chiropractors, chiropodists, osteopaths, occupational therapists, those working in homeopathy, acupuncture, nutritional therapy, reflexology, nutrition, as well as psychology, speech therapy, arts therapy.

The deadline for making your disclosure and paying what you owe was 6 April 2014.

People who missed the opportunity can still make a disclosure by using the Campaign Voluntary Disclosure Helpline on 0300 123 1077 - Monday to Friday, 8am to 6:30pm.

The original guidance on how to make your voluntary disclosure is still available.

My Tax Return Catch Up Plan

The My Tax Return Catch Up Plan was aimed at people who received a tax return or notice to file a return for years up to and including 2011-12, and who had not acted. People had until 15 October 2013 to file all their outstanding tax returns and pay what they owe. After that, HMRC began to take a much closer look at their tax affairs. By using this campaign to come forward, customers received the best terms available.

Property Sales Campaign

The Property Sales campaign is a chance for people to bring their tax up to date if they have sold a residential property, in the UK or abroad, that’s not their main home. If people made a profit but have not told HMRC, they might not have paid the right amount of tax. To take advantage of the best possible terms people needed to have voluntarily disclosed income or gains and to have paid what they owed by 6 September 2013.

The disclosure deadline has now passed and our follow up compliance work focused on those who should have come forward is underway. Although the terms on offer during the disclosure are no longer guaranteed, it will still be better for anyone who has something to tell us about to come forward.

Direct Selling campaign

The Direct Selling campaign gave people involved in direct selling, who had not told HMRC about all of their income, a chance to bring their tax up to date on the best possible terms. Direct selling is where people sell directly to customers usually door to door or in customers’ homes or the workplace.

The voluntary disclosure opportunity offered as part of the Direct Selling campaign closed on 28 February 2013. Cases are now being considered for follow-up action.

VAT Outstanding Returns campaign

The VAT Outstanding Returns campaign was a chance for those who ere registered for VAT, but had not sent in all of their VAT Returns, to bring their VAT Returns and payments up to date on the best possible terms.

The voluntary opportunity offered as part of the VAT Outstanding Returns campaign closed on the 28 February 2013. The identification of cases suitable for compliance checks and criminal investigation is ongoing.

Tax Return Initiative

The Tax Return Initiative was aimed at higher rate tax paying individuals who had been sent a Self Assessment (SA) tax return, or had been told they should send one in, but had not submitted a return.

The Tax Return Initiative voluntary disclosure opportunity closed on 2 October 2012. HMRC is following up against those targeted in this campaign who chose not to take part. This includes issuing estimates of the amount of tax owed and collecting payment through court action or by using a debt collection agency.

e-Marketplaces campaign

The e-Marketplaces campaign was a chance for those who use electronic marketplace websites to buy and sell goods as a trade or business, but who had not paid what they owe, to bring their tax affairs up to date on the best possible terms.

The voluntary disclosure opportunity offered as part of the e-marketplaces campaign (e-MDF) closed in September 2012. HMRC is successfully continuing to use the data gathered to support the campaign to identify those who should have come forward but chose not to. HMRC are looking for cases suitable for investigation.

Tax Catch Up Plan for tutors and coaches

The Tax Catch Up Plan is for those who provide private tuition, instruction and coaching, either as a main or as a secondary income - which they choose not to tell HMRC about. Whilst the time limited voluntary disclosure opportunity closed on 31 March 2012 it is still better to come forward to HMRC as we continue to look for cases suitable for investigation

The VAT Initiative

The VAT Initiative campaign focused on individuals and businesses operating at or above the VAT threshold who had not registered for VAT. Those that came forward were given help by HMRC to pay what they owe and to claim VAT repayments. HMRC continues to help those that came forward to get their affairs in order.

HMRC continues to follow up on those businesses where the information held suggests that the VAT turnover threshold had been exceeded. This could lead to the compulsory registration of businesses and a possible ‘failure to notify’ penalty of up to 100 per cent of the VAT due.

Electricians’ Tax Safe Plan

The Electricians Tax Safe Plan was an opportunity for people who install, maintain and test electrical systems, equipment and appliances, who had not told HMRC about all their income in the past, to bring their tax affairs up to date on the best possible terms.

The voluntary disclosure opportunity closed in August 2012.

Plumbers’ Tax Safe Plan

The Plumbers Tax Safe Plan was a chance for people working as plumbers, gas fitters, heating engineers and associated trades, who had not told HMRC about all their income in the past, to bring their tax affairs up to date on the best possible terms.

The voluntary disclosure opportunity closed in August 2011. As at 30 June 2012, six plumbers have been convicted with more expected to follow.

Medics Tax Health Plan

The Medics Tax Health Plan first offered a voluntary opportunity for doctors and dentists, with tax to pay, to get their affairs up to date with the benefit of a fixed penalty.

The voluntary opportunity closed in June 2010. The disclosures included one individual payment of over £1 million by a doctor and one of over £300,000 by a dentist. Our risk and intervention programme is ongoing so for those who need to it is still better to come forward to HMRC.

New (offshore) Disclosure Opportunity

The New Disclosure Opportunity was designed to provide one final chance for UK based individuals and businesses, with unpaid tax linked to an offshore account or asset, to make a disclosure and put their affairs in order. 15 individual payments over £500,000 four of which were in excess of £1 million.

The New (offshore) Disclosure Opportunity was open to those with any offshore interest, assets or accounts. Data from financial institutions was provided and HMRC has used this and other information to open thousands of enquiries.

Offshore Disclosure Facility

The Offshore Disclosure Facility was the first HMRC campaign and ran between April and November 2007.

The Offshore Disclosure Facility was based on data obtained from five major UK financial institutions. Like the New (offshore) Disclosure Opportunity, it gave people or businesses with unpaid tax connected to an offshore account or asset an opportunity to make a full disclosure of liabilities and to pay duties, interest and penalties due.

The campaign was the first of its kind and provided information and understanding of the way offshore accounts and assets were used that was carried into the first full offshore campaign (the New (offshore) Disclosure Opportunity) covering all institutions offering offshore facilities to UK based entities. After the ODF HMRC made follow up enquiries, mainly based on data gathered following a successful application for notices on five major UK financial institutions.

December 08, 2014 11:22 AM

December 05, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

LibreOffice 4.3, First Take: Still desktop-bound - ZDNet


ZDNet

LibreOffice 4.3, First Take: Still desktop-bound
ZDNet
LibreOffice continues to warn you that documents you save in the Office formats may not retain all their contents, but using its own ODF format doesn't preserve compatibility either — images in a document we saved as ODT darkened to the point of ...

December 05, 2014 02:04 AM

December 01, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Kampagne für die Bereitstellung aller EU-Dokumente in offenen Standardformaten - Pro-Linux


Kampagne für die Bereitstellung aller EU-Dokumente in offenen Standardformaten
Pro-Linux
Die Europäische Kommission selbst empfiehlt seit einiger Zeit, editierbare Dokumente in mindestens zwei Formaten zu publizieren, die als ISO-Standards normiert wurden. Es handelt sich dabei um das Open Document Format (ODF) und Office Open XML.

December 01, 2014 01:04 PM

November 30, 2014

Planet KDE

Comparing text style support in Calligra, Abiword and LibreOffice

KDE Project:

This weekend I spent time on preparing for the ODF Plugfest again. The test software ODFAutoTests now has many more tests. Most new tests are for text styles. I've created tests for each of the possible attributes in <style:text-properties/>.

You can have a look at the results *here*. If you want to recreate the tests, you can download a compiled version of the test software. It can be run like this:

usage: java -jar odftester.jar [-c <arg>] -i <arg> -r <arg> -t <arg>
 -c,--run-config <arg>   xml file that contains the instructions for running the
                         loading and saving of the documents in the various ODF
                         implementations. If this option is absent, the files
                         will not be loaded and saved, but the files from
                         results-dir will be analyzed into a report
 -i,--input-dir <arg>    the directory for the documents that are generated from
                         the test definition
 -r,--result-dir <arg>   the directory for the results of the loading and saving
                         of the files from input-dir
 -t,--tests <arg>        xml file that contains the tests

To run it you'll also need to download the configuration and test description files.

I'm happy to receive test files for more ODF tests or configuration settings to run the tests with more ODF software. It's only one more week to the ODF Plugfest.

Image: 

by Jos van den Oever (vandenoever) at November 30, 2014 10:59 PM

Table View and Report Barcodes junior jobs

KDE Project:

Kexi has improved quite a bit since the last time, especially in Reports. We're close to supplementary 2.8.7 release within Calligra, then 2.9 will follow and Qt5/KF5-based 3.0 with a shiny mask.

We're about to reach the point where it's very very hard to find comparable Free Software reporting tool in terms of usability. If you don't know why reporting software may be useful, try to generate 50 or 500 pages PDF out of structured data with just mouse clicks and no programming. Get the report file generated in 2 seconds or less. Or print the report directly without creating intermediate PDF or ODF or HTML files that will pollute your computer... It's data that matters.

All this is only possible because smart people join the effort. Today two new Junior Jobs appeared for software engineers: for Table View and Report Barcodes. Don't be shy :)

1. Port "Interleaved 2 of 5" barcodes support from OpenRPT

2. Add "Open as Query" action to Table local menu

PS: Reminder, there are still many smaller jobs for Kexi Reports. More Junior Jobs can be spotted here.

PS2: And did you know the Reports contains a reusable reporting library that would be public once ported to Qt 5?




Marco Orazi, by nc nd



                              

by Jarosław Staniek (jstaniek) at November 30, 2014 12:27 AM

November 29, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Archive of #AskChampika: Twitter Q&A with Champika Ranawaka - Groundviews


Groundviews

Archive of #AskChampika: Twitter Q&A with Champika Ranawaka
Groundviews
An archive of all the tweets can be downloaded as an Excel spreadsheet (XLS) here or in the OpenDocument Format (ODF) here. Note that in our experience, the archives don't behave well using the currently available version of Excel for Apple OS X and ...

and more »

November 29, 2014 03:21 AM

November 28, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Make your files collaboration-friendly - Business Management Daily


Make your files collaboration-friendly
Business Management Daily
Wallen offers some tips to help make your files easy to share. • Utilize open standard format. “Instead of opting for the proprietary Microsoft formats, switch to one that's welcomed by nearly all office suites: ODF. You'll find a much more seamless ...

November 28, 2014 04:05 PM

November 27, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

CloudStack and OSS generally - IT-Director.com (blog)


CloudStack and OSS generally
IT-Director.com (blog)
... Met Office), will be talking about his practical experience with managing OSS. It is just a real pity that the BCS CMSG sent its flier out in proprietary DOCX format instead of the OASIS Open Standard ODF format, which even the UK government now ...

November 27, 2014 11:37 AM

Archive of tweets on 2015 Presidential Election - Groundviews


Groundviews

Archive of tweets on 2015 Presidential Election
Groundviews
Accordingly, Groundviews will archive tweets week by week, and make available all the content through a web interface, Excel (XLS) and OpenDocument Format (ODF). Note that in our experience, the archives don't behave well using the currently available ...

November 27, 2014 09:04 AM

November 24, 2014

Planet KDE

ODFAutoTests gearing up towards the 10th ODF Plugfest in London

In two weeks time, users and developers of OpenDocument Format software will meet up for a two day ODF plugfest in London. In preparation of the plugfest, I have spent last weekend, refreshing ODFAutoTests. ODFAutoTests is a tool for creating test documents for ODF software and running these documents through the different implementations. If you want to help out with improving OpenDocument Format, please come to the plugfest, or participate online. Writing tests with ODFAutoTests is a great way to help make the 10th ODF Plugfest a success.

Image: 

by Jos van den Oever (vandenoever) at November 24, 2014 11:07 PM

November 21, 2014

ODF Wikipedia Page

Dewritech: clean up, typo(s) fixed: commitee → committee using AWB

clean up, typo(s) fixed: commitee → committee using AWB

← Previous revision Revision as of 19:08, 21 November 2014
Line 131: Line 131:
 
{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
 
{{Main|OpenDocument standardization}}
   
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[ Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS Standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules.
+
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS Standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules.
   
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 - Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 - Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]}}</ref>
Line 138: Line 138:
   
 
Further standardization work with OpenDocument includes:
 
Further standardization work with OpenDocument includes:
*The [[ Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards|OASIS]] Committee Specification [http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/download.php/19274/OpenDocument-v1.0ed2-cs1.pdf '''OpenDocument 1.0''' (second edition)] corresponds to the published ISO/IEC 26300:2006 standard. The content of ISO/IEC 26300 and OASIS OpenDocument v1.0 2nd ed. is identical.<ref>{{citation |url=http://standards.iso.org/ittf/PubliclyAvailableStandards/c043485_ISO_IEC_26300_2006(E).zip |title=ISO/IEC 26300:2006 |format=ZIP, PDF |publisher=ISO |accessdate=22 November 2009}}</ref> It includes the editorial changes made to address JTC1 ballot comments. It is available in ODF, HTML and PDF formats.
+
*The [[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards|OASIS]] Committee Specification [http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/download.php/19274/OpenDocument-v1.0ed2-cs1.pdf '''OpenDocument 1.0''' (second edition)] corresponds to the published ISO/IEC 26300:2006 standard. The content of ISO/IEC 26300 and OASIS OpenDocument v1.0 2nd ed. is identical.<ref>{{citation |url=http://standards.iso.org/ittf/PubliclyAvailableStandards/c043485_ISO_IEC_26300_2006(E).zip |title=ISO/IEC 26300:2006 |format=ZIP, PDF |publisher=ISO |accessdate=22 November 2009}}</ref> It includes the editorial changes made to address JTC1 ballot comments. It is available in ODF, HTML and PDF formats.
 
*'''[http://docs.oasis-open.org/office/v1.1/OS/OpenDocument-v1.1.pdf OpenDocument 1.1]''' includes additional features to address accessibility concerns.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office#odf11 | title=OpenDocument 1.1 Specifications | year=2006 | accessdate=31 October 2006 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> It was approved as an OASIS Standard on 2007-02-01 following a call for vote issued on 2007-01-16.<ref>{{cite web | title=Approval of OpenDocument v1.1 as OASIS Standard | url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200702/msg00003.html | accessdate=6 February 2007 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> The public announcement was made on 2007-02-13.<ref>{{cite web | title=Members Approve OpenDocument Version 1.1 as OASIS Standard | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/news/oasis-news-2007-02-14.php | accessdate=15 February 2007 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> This version was not initially submitted to ISO/IEC, because it is considered to be a minor update to ODF 1.0 only, and OASIS were working already on ODF 1.2 at the time ODF 1.1 was approved.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.zdnet.co.uk/talkback/0,1000001161,39409700-39001068c-20093634o,00.htm|title=OOXML expert: ODF standard is broken|author=Peter Judge|publisher=ZDNet|date=2 May 2008 -- 14:47 GMT (07:47 PDT)|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> However it was later submitted to ISO/IEC (as of March 2011, it was in "enquiry stage" as Draft Amendment 1 - ISO/IEC 26300:2006/DAM 1) and published in March 2012 as "ISO/IEC 26300:2006/Amd 1:2012 — Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.1".<ref name="iso.org"/><ref name="http"/>
 
*'''[http://docs.oasis-open.org/office/v1.1/OS/OpenDocument-v1.1.pdf OpenDocument 1.1]''' includes additional features to address accessibility concerns.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office#odf11 | title=OpenDocument 1.1 Specifications | year=2006 | accessdate=31 October 2006 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> It was approved as an OASIS Standard on 2007-02-01 following a call for vote issued on 2007-01-16.<ref>{{cite web | title=Approval of OpenDocument v1.1 as OASIS Standard | url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200702/msg00003.html | accessdate=6 February 2007 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> The public announcement was made on 2007-02-13.<ref>{{cite web | title=Members Approve OpenDocument Version 1.1 as OASIS Standard | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/news/oasis-news-2007-02-14.php | accessdate=15 February 2007 | publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]}}</ref> This version was not initially submitted to ISO/IEC, because it is considered to be a minor update to ODF 1.0 only, and OASIS were working already on ODF 1.2 at the time ODF 1.1 was approved.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.zdnet.co.uk/talkback/0,1000001161,39409700-39001068c-20093634o,00.htm|title=OOXML expert: ODF standard is broken|author=Peter Judge|publisher=ZDNet|date=2 May 2008 -- 14:47 GMT (07:47 PDT)|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> However it was later submitted to ISO/IEC (as of March 2011, it was in "enquiry stage" as Draft Amendment 1 - ISO/IEC 26300:2006/DAM 1) and published in March 2012 as "ISO/IEC 26300:2006/Amd 1:2012 — Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.1".<ref name="iso.org"/><ref name="http"/>
*'''[http://docs.oasis-open.org/office/v1.2/OpenDocument-v1.2.pdf OpenDocument 1.2]''' includes additional accessibility features, [[Resource Description Framework|RDF]]-based metadata,<ref name="register">{{cite web|accessdate=18 April 2012|publisher=The Register|url=http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/09/12/libreoffice_extensions_and_templates_store_open/|date=3 October 2011|title=Open Document Format updated to fix spreadsheets|first=Gavin|last=Clarke}}</ref> a spreadsheet formula specification based on [[OpenFormula]],<ref name="register" /> support for digital signatures and some features suggested by the public. It consists of three parts: Part 1: OpenDocument Schema, Part 2: Recalculated Formula (OpenFormula) Format and Part 3: Packages. Version 1.2 of the specification was approved as an OASIS Standard on 29 September 2011.<ref name="odf12">{{citation |url=http://www.oasis-open.org/news/pr/odf-1-2-approval |title=Members Approve OpenDocument Format (ODF) Version 1.2 as OASIS Standard |date=5 October 2011 |accessdate=12 April 2012}}</ref> It has been submitted to the relevant ISO commitee under the Publicly Available Specification (PAS) procedure in March 2014.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://isotc.iso.org/livelink/livelink?func=ll&objId=16678620&objAction=Open | format=PDF | title=Minutes of ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 teleconference meeting, 2014-04-16 | date=2014-04-24 | | accessdate=2014-10-13}}</ref> As of October 2014, it has been unanimously approved as a Draft International Standard, some comments have been raised in process that need to be addressed before OpenDocument 1.2 can proceed to become an International Standard.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://isotc.iso.org/livelink/livelink?func=ll&objId=16810106&objAction=Open | format=PDF | title=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 N 103 Minutes of teleconference meeting of ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 2014-09-24, 23:00-00:00 UTC | date=2014-09-25 | accessdate=2014-10-13}}</ref>
+
*'''[http://docs.oasis-open.org/office/v1.2/OpenDocument-v1.2.pdf OpenDocument 1.2]''' includes additional accessibility features, [[Resource Description Framework|RDF]]-based metadata,<ref name="register">{{cite web|accessdate=18 April 2012|publisher=The Register|url=http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/09/12/libreoffice_extensions_and_templates_store_open/|date=3 October 2011|title=Open Document Format updated to fix spreadsheets|first=Gavin|last=Clarke}}</ref> a spreadsheet formula specification based on [[OpenFormula]],<ref name="register" /> support for digital signatures and some features suggested by the public. It consists of three parts: Part 1: OpenDocument Schema, Part 2: Recalculated Formula (OpenFormula) Format and Part 3: Packages. Version 1.2 of the specification was approved as an OASIS Standard on 29 September 2011.<ref name="odf12">{{citation |url=http://www.oasis-open.org/news/pr/odf-1-2-approval |title=Members Approve OpenDocument Format (ODF) Version 1.2 as OASIS Standard |date=5 October 2011 |accessdate=12 April 2012}}</ref> It has been submitted to the relevant ISO committee under the Publicly Available Specification (PAS) procedure in March 2014.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://isotc.iso.org/livelink/livelink?func=ll&objId=16678620&objAction=Open | format=PDF | title=Minutes of ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 teleconference meeting, 2014-04-16 | date=2014-04-24 | accessdate=2014-10-13}}</ref> As of October 2014, it has been unanimously approved as a Draft International Standard, some comments have been raised in process that need to be addressed before OpenDocument 1.2 can proceed to become an International Standard.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://isotc.iso.org/livelink/livelink?func=ll&objId=16810106&objAction=Open | format=PDF | title=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 N 103 Minutes of teleconference meeting of ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34/WG 6 2014-09-24, 23:00-00:00 UTC | date=2014-09-25 | accessdate=2014-10-13}}</ref>
   
 
===Future===
 
===Future===
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*Several organisations, such as the [http://opendocumentfellowship.com/ OpenDocument Fellowship] and [http://opendocsociety.org/ OpenDoc Society] were founded to support and promote OpenDocument.
 
*Several organisations, such as the [http://opendocumentfellowship.com/ OpenDocument Fellowship] and [http://opendocsociety.org/ OpenDoc Society] were founded to support and promote OpenDocument.
 
<!-- *The [http://www.oidi.org OIDI.org] (Open Interoperative Document Initiative) is committed to encouraging efforts by governments at all levels, around the globe, to implement changes necessary to ensure public documents are open and interoperable and thus available to all citizens/residents without the need for specific vendor software. -->
 
<!-- *The [http://www.oidi.org OIDI.org] (Open Interoperative Document Initiative) is committed to encouraging efforts by governments at all levels, around the globe, to implement changes necessary to ensure public documents are open and interoperable and thus available to all citizens/residents without the need for specific vendor software. -->
*The UK government has adopted ODF as the standard for all documents in the UK civil service <ref>{{cite web | url=https://www.gov.uk/government/news/open-document-formats-selected-to-meet-user-needs|title=Open document formats selected to meet user needs}} </ref>
+
*The UK government has adopted ODF as the standard for all documents in the UK civil service <ref>{{cite web | url=https://www.gov.uk/government/news/open-document-formats-selected-to-meet-user-needs|title=Open document formats selected to meet user needs}}</ref>
 
*The [[Wikimedia Foundation]] supports ODF export from [[MediaWiki]], which powers [[Wikipedia]] and a number of other Internet [[wiki]]-based sites.<ref>{{cite web | url= http://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Wikis_Go_Printable | title= Wikis Go Printable | work= [[Wikimedia Foundation]] | date= 13 December 2007 | accessdate= 31 December 2007}}</ref>
 
*The [[Wikimedia Foundation]] supports ODF export from [[MediaWiki]], which powers [[Wikipedia]] and a number of other Internet [[wiki]]-based sites.<ref>{{cite web | url= http://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Wikis_Go_Printable | title= Wikis Go Printable | work= [[Wikimedia Foundation]] | date= 13 December 2007 | accessdate= 31 December 2007}}</ref>
   

by Dewritech at November 21, 2014 07:08 PM

Janvlug: /* Worldwide adoption */ Norway is not a EU member

Worldwide adoption: Norway is not a EU member

← Previous revision Revision as of 14:25, 21 November 2014
Line 265: Line 265:
 
** [[Italy]]
 
** [[Italy]]
 
** [[Netherlands]]<ref>{{cite web |title=ODF 1.2 on Dutch "apply or explain" list |url=https://lijsten.forumstandaardisatie.nl/open-standaard/odf12}}</ref>
 
** [[Netherlands]]<ref>{{cite web |title=ODF 1.2 on Dutch "apply or explain" list |url=https://lijsten.forumstandaardisatie.nl/open-standaard/odf12}}</ref>
** [[Norway]]<ref name="NorwayDocumentStandard">{{cite web |title=New obligatory IT standards for the state sector adopted |url=http://www.regjeringen.no/en/dep/fad/press-centre/press-releases/2009/new-obligatory-it-standards-for-the-stat.html?id=570650 |accessdate=19 December 2012}}</ref>
 
 
** [[Poland]]
 
** [[Poland]]
 
** [[Portugal]]<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.esop.pt/portugal-publishes-open-standards-catalogodf-pdf-and-several-other-standards-are-mandatory/ |title=ESOP » Portugal publishes open standards catalog. ODF, PDF and several other standards are mandatory |publisher=Esop.pt |date= |accessdate=2013-05-01}}</ref>
 
** [[Portugal]]<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.esop.pt/portugal-publishes-open-standards-catalogodf-pdf-and-several-other-standards-are-mandatory/ |title=ESOP » Portugal publishes open standards catalog. ODF, PDF and several other standards are mandatory |publisher=Esop.pt |date= |accessdate=2013-05-01}}</ref>
Line 273: Line 272:
 
{{endflatlist}}
 
{{endflatlist}}
 
{{startflatlist}}
 
{{startflatlist}}
  +
* [[Norway]]<ref name="NorwayDocumentStandard">{{cite web |title=New obligatory IT standards for the state sector adopted |url=http://www.regjeringen.no/en/dep/fad/press-centre/press-releases/2009/new-obligatory-it-standards-for-the-stat.html?id=570650 |accessdate=19 December 2012}}</ref>
 
* Russia
 
* Russia
 
* [[Serbia]]
 
* [[Serbia]]

by Janvlug at November 21, 2014 02:25 PM

Janvlug: /* Worldwide adoption */ Added attribute to NATO referece.

Worldwide adoption: Added attribute to NATO referece.

← Previous revision Revision as of 14:17, 21 November 2014
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!style="padding:0.25em 1.0em;"| International
 
!style="padding:0.25em 1.0em;"| International
 
|colspan="2" class="hlist" style="vertical-align:top;padding:0.25em 0.5em;"|
 
|colspan="2" class="hlist" style="vertical-align:top;padding:0.25em 0.5em;"|
* [[NATO]]<ref>https://nhqc3s.hq.nato.int/Apps/Architecture/NISP2/standard.aspx?vndb=standards&vsbn=y&refid=iso-iec-26300&sbbs=y</ref>
+
* [[NATO]]<ref>{{cite web |title=NATO Interoperability Standards and Profiles |url=https://nhqc3s.hq.nato.int/Apps/Architecture/NISP2/standard.aspx?vndb=standards&vsbn=y&refid=iso-iec-26300&sbbs=y |accessdate=21 November 2014}}</ref>
 
|-
 
|-
   

by Janvlug at November 21, 2014 02:17 PM

Janvlug: /* Worldwide adoption */ Added reference to NATO site stating ODF as mandatory standard

Worldwide adoption: Added reference to NATO site stating ODF as mandatory standard

← Previous revision Revision as of 14:10, 21 November 2014
Line 237: Line 237:
 
!style="padding:0.25em 1.0em;"| International
 
!style="padding:0.25em 1.0em;"| International
 
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* [[NATO]]<ref>https://nhqc3s.hq.nato.int/Apps/Architecture/NISP2/standard.aspx?vndb=standards&vsbn=y&refid=iso-iec-26300&sbbs=y</ref>
 
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by Janvlug at November 21, 2014 02:10 PM

November 20, 2014

Charles H. Schulz

Standards and Weapons

I have been writing a lot about the benefits of standards -especially open standards- for economic growth and citizens’ empowerement. Today however, I would like to explore, or at least highlight  a more obscure side of standards.

Standards can be used as weapons; by weapons I mean tools of influence, economic and technological domination from one country, one company over others. Standards are not just developed by means of sitting around a table with other parties and deciding how it will be developed. Sometimes, a party will push forward the base of a standard, and by sharing this base, will ultimately influence the whole industry or ecosystem through the outcome of standardization: the existence of the standard and its adoption. Other times, the very fact that a standard is being developed and pushed on the market is a threat to existing other standards. In a way, this is what could have happened with ODF, only in this case the Microsoft Office binary file formats were never standards in the first place. But then the very fact that OOXML was ever submitted to the ISO created the second standard that partly broke the momentum of ODF adoption.

 Other examples can be seen in other industries as well. Is there anything that can be done? Well, for one thing, it is important to realize that standards can become a rather dynamic affair. A standard with an expected power struggle, that is a standard that is already a bone of contention between two companies or two countries can be turned around into a struggle of different nature between different opponents.

Another important consideration is that a standard should always be contemplated not just in terms of what problem it claims to be solving but through a variety of parameters. Chiefly among them, the identity of its authors, the intellectual property rights and regime applicable to its specification, the state of the standard implementations and the players providing them, the existing standards in the same field, etc.

My humble experience in the field of digital standards makes me think that no standard is ever innocent, not in itself but by the intent of its authors or implementors. Even a nice and deeply useful standard such as ODF is a big stone thrown in the backyard of Microsoft. At this point you may be wondering if this post is essentially a change in position from what I’ve written here thoughout all these years (after all, this blog is called “Moved by Freedom, Powered by Standards”). It actually isn’t in any way. Standards are tools; they are opportunities for collaboration, economic and technical improvement. But they are limited in regulating the good or bad will of their stakeholders, and truth be told, I don’t think any process or tools could ever do that ex ante. The development rules, the IPR, the transparency of the process can be very effective in regulating the defects as well as whatever issues specific to standard itself may appear. They can even help fostering an effective ecosystem around the standard. But once you step up to a more strategic level, you need to go beyond the standards’ internal and external qualities (the specification itself, its IPR, its development process, etc.) . You need to understand who is doing what in the industry, who are the contenders and established players, the technological and legal disruptions, and even the political intent driving to the adoption of a standard or discouraging it. You need to understand why there’s even a standard in the first place.

With what has been previously called “true open standards”, things tend to improve insofar as their true openness guarantee the absence of vendor lock-in. Yet true open standards are assessed dynamically, never on the basis of predefined rules. As an example, one may demand that the IPR mode of a standard be only Royalty-Free. If there are two Royalty-Free competing standards, both satisfy this requirement, yet perhaps one of these two is ultimately controlled by a vendor, while the other one has a genuine inclusive development process. The history of ODF and OOXML is an interesting case in regard of using pre-defined criteria that may lead to a partial assessment of a standard.

All in all, standards are tools, and tools can often be used as weapons. It is never about the tool itself, but about the hand guiding it. Anybody can use a hammer, even me and my two left hands. But you can choose to hammer nails to suspend picture frames on a wall, or you can choose to use the hammer to throw it in the face of someone. The hammer is not responsible of your choice, for you only have had an intent guiding the hammer. Standards are no different; they can be both tools of liberation and economic welfare, or they can be used as competition crushers and weapons of economical warfare. In any case, judge by the hand first and the tool second.

by Charles at November 20, 2014 11:30 AM

November 19, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Europe Commission approves Tradeshift data format for goverment purchasing - Bobsguide (press release)


Europe Commission approves Tradeshift data format for goverment purchasing
Bobsguide (press release)
OASIS is the same organization that created ODF, the Open Document Format (ISO/IEC 26300), a widely used International Standard for word processing. As a result of the EC decision, Tradeshift's users can expect easy data integration with regulatory and ...

and more »

November 19, 2014 11:03 AM

November 18, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

EC approves Tradeshift data format for government purchasing.. - Finextra (press release)


EC approves Tradeshift data format for government purchasing..
Finextra (press release)
OASIS is the same organization that created ODF, the Open Document Format (ISO/IEC 26300), a widely used International Standard for word processing. As a result of the EC decision, Tradeshift's users can expect easy data integration with regulatory and ...

and more »

November 18, 2014 05:05 PM

EC approves Tradeshift data format for government purchasing - Finextra


EC approves Tradeshift data format for government purchasing
Finextra
OASIS is the same organization that created ODF, the Open Document Format (ISO/IEC 26300), a widely used International Standard for word processing. As a result of the EC decision, Tradeshift's users can expect easy data integration with regulatory and ...

and more »

November 18, 2014 05:02 PM

EC approves Tradeshift data format for government purchasing - Finextra


EC approves Tradeshift data format for government purchasing
Finextra
OASIS is the same organization that created ODF, the Open Document Format (ISO/IEC 26300), a widely used International Standard for word processing. As a result of the EC decision, Tradeshift's users can expect easy data integration with regulatory and ...

and more »

November 18, 2014 05:01 PM

EC approves Tradeshift data format for government purchasing - Finextra


EC approves Tradeshift data format for government purchasing
Finextra
OASIS is the same organization that created ODF, the Open Document Format (ISO/IEC 26300), a widely used International Standard for word processing. As a result of the EC decision, Tradeshift's users can expect easy data integration with regulatory and ...

and more »

November 18, 2014 05:01 PM

UK Government

Statistical data set: ENV18 - Local authority collected waste: annual results tables

Updated: New datasets published.

These datasets contain the annual results for local authority collected waste in England including:

  • England and the regions data downloads for April 2000 to March 2014
  • local council data downloads from April 2005 to March 2014
  • household recycling by material type April 1996 to March 2010

Local authority collected waste from households from January 2010 to March 2014 - England data.

This file is in an OpenDocument format

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Local authority collected waste generation from April 2000 to March 2014 (England and regions) and local authority data April 2013 to March 2014

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Local authority collected waste statistics - Local authority data, England: April 2012 to March 2013

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Local authority collected and household waste statistics 2011 to 2012

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Local authority collected and household waste statistics 2010 to 2011

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Local authority collected and household waste statistics 2009 to 2010

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Local authority collected and household waste statistics 2008 to 2009

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Local authority collected and household waste statistics 2007 to 2008

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Local authority collected and household waste statistics 2006 to 2007

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Local authority collected and household waste statistics 2005 to 2006

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England carbon metric report - Summary

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Household recycling by material and region, England: April 1996 to March 2010

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November 18, 2014 09:30 AM

Statistical data set: ENV19 - Local authority collected waste: quarterly tables

Updated: Final quarter figures incorporated.

This data set covers the provisional quarterly estimates of local authority collected waste generation and management for England and the regions.

Quarterly local authority collected waste statistics from 2010 incorporation January to March 2014

This file is in an OpenDocument format

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November 18, 2014 09:30 AM

November 17, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

£17 million project for 140 new homes in Salford's Ordsall - bdaily


bdaily

£17 million project for 140 new homes in Salford's Ordsall
bdaily
Launched in 2006 the Ordsall Development Framework (ODF) was created to bring about transformational change to historically one of the most deprived areas in the UK. Under the partnership with Salford City Council, LPC Living, which is owned by the ...

and more »

November 17, 2014 02:36 PM

November 14, 2014

UK Government

Corporate information: Research at HMRC

Research reports

Our research and analysis publications can be found at HMRC Publications: Research and analysis.

Working papers series

The Working Papers are occasional papers on analytical issues, produced by or on behalf of HMRC.

Contact the research team

For enquiries on the HMRC research and analysis programme, contact:

Brian O'Callaghan
HMRC Knowledge Analysis and Intelligence Directorate
4th Floor, South Spur
Bush House SW Wing
Strand
London
WC2B 4RD

Email: Brian O’Callaghan

For information on Customer Understanding Research:

Uma Kushalappa
HMRC Customer Insight & Knowledge Team
3E/03
100 Parliament St
London
SW1A 2BQ

Email: Uma Kushalappa

Research activities funded by HMRC

The documents below set out current research activities funded by HMRC’s programme of research:

The HMRC Datalab

The HMRC Datalab allows approved academics to access de-identified HMRC data in a secure environment.

The aim of the Datalab is to help researchers to produce high quality research that benefits both HMRC and the wider academic community.

Data protection policies and standards

The Datalab follows HMRC’s strict data protection policies. There are restrictions on working practices to safeguard taxpayer confidentiality. To become an ‘approved academic researcher’, institutions have to submit a proposal and complete a short training course.

The Datalab is governed by the Commissioners for Revenue and Customs Act (CRCA) 2005, which dictates who HMRC can allow to access their data and for what reasons.

Research proposals for the Datalab must serve one of HMRC’s functions under the CRCA 2005. See IDG47000 - Disclosure for the purposes of HMRC’s functions or further information.

Applying to use the HMRC Datalab

To apply to use the HMRC Datalab:

  1. download and complete the Datalab project proposal form: HMRC Datalab Project Proposal Application (ODT, 24.7KB)

  2. email the form to: HMRC Datalab

It’s important that your proposal shows how your research will be:

  • useful for HMRC
  • improved using HMRC data rather than other available sources

The Datalab Team will then advise you on your project, and may request more detailed information.

Proposals are then evaluated against these criteria:

  • contribution to HMRC functions
  • long-term benefit to HMRC
  • research design and likely impact of the research
  • feasibility of the research

HMRC is more likely to support projects that are relevant to contemporary research questions.

All research in the HMRC Datalab must be independent, with the results intended for publication.

It may be useful to see this list of approved research proposals to help you with your submission:

HMRC research proposals approved to date

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These are topics currently of interest to HMRC which we would like to see explored in the HMRC Datalab:

  • efficiency improvements within HMRC
  • compliance
  • data issues
  • tax policy

Application submission deadlines

Applications are assessed on a quarterly basis:

  • 15 December 2014, to be discussed on 16 January 2015
  • 13 March 2015, to be discussed on 10 April 2015
  • 13 June 2015, to be discussed on 10 July 2015

Available datasets

These are the datasets currently available in the HMRC Datalab.

Other HMRC datasets

You can submit a proposal requesting the use of datasets not listed above, if the information you need is currently not available in the Datalab. Please consult our data catalogue for further information on the data that HMRC holds:

HMRC Data Catalogue

Using and matching your own data

You will need to describe the data you would like to bring and the HMRC Datalab Team will consider each dataset on a case by case basis.

Key identifiers have been removed from the HMRC Datalab datasets as part of the de-identification process so matching will have to be undertaken by HMRC.

Contact the HMRC Datalab

If you have any questions about the Datalab please contact us.

Bush House (South West Wing)
Strand
London
WC2B 4RD

Email: HMRC Datalab

November 14, 2014 03:36 PM

Guidance: Enterprise Management Incentives (EMI) Notification template

On this page you’ll find the attachment you need to tell HMRC about EMI options granted during the tax year, along with guidance notes to help you fill out the worksheet.

Get the right software

You’ll need software that can open Open Document Format (ODF) files, such as a recent version of Microsoft Excel or the free LibreOffice. Download the latest version of LibreOffice.

November 14, 2014 02:51 PM

Apache OpenOffice Blog

"Oh-oh-XML" - Digitale Zeitbombe in deutschen Amtsstuben - Netzpolitik.org


"Oh-oh-XML" - Digitale Zeitbombe in deutschen Amtsstuben
Netzpolitik.org
ODF-78c8e0a8f69c7b2c Dieser Beitrag ist eine Ergänzung zu Matthias' Zusammenfassung der LiMux-Debatte in der Stadt München, die mit dem Aufruf endet, dass Bund und Länder Offene Standards unterstützen müssen. In der Tat hinkt die deutsche ...

and more »

November 14, 2014 07:04 AM

November 13, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Stada kann EinbuÃ?en in Russland auffangen - AD HOC NEWS


Stada kann EinbuÃ?en in Russland auffangen
AD HOC NEWS
News: Eurpäische Kommission empfiehlt Open Document Format Alle Institutionen der EU sollen in der Lage sein, das Open Document Format (ODF) intern und im Dialog mit den Bürgern und anderen Institutionen einzusetzen. Das erklärte jetzt MaroÅ¡ Å ...

and more »

November 13, 2014 03:41 PM

November 10, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Microsoft-Chef Satya Nadella spricht vor Studenten der TU-Berlin - WinFuture


WinFuture

Microsoft-Chef Satya Nadella spricht vor Studenten der TU-Berlin
WinFuture
Bis zur 2013er-Version konnte man mit MS Office nämlich nicht ein einziges natives Dateiformat eines anderen Office-Paketes am Markt einlesen (Und auch jetzt kann MS Office lediglich das ODF-Format lesen, während OpenOffice bei mir sogar alte ...

and more »

November 10, 2014 04:43 PM

Xerox declares the end of paper (again) - FierceEnterpriseCommunications


Xerox declares the end of paper (again)
FierceEnterpriseCommunications
From what the company's videos manage to show, it's a system for storing and distributing documents in a new format--not ODF, not PDF and not OOXML. The purpose of this, as Xerox describes it, is to enable a common data store of all documents that ...

and more »

November 10, 2014 01:34 PM

November 07, 2014

Planet KDE

Where is KDE 5 and when can I use it?

The vast majority of users, when talking about "using KDE", are talking about the desktop. Plasma, that is. So when you ask "when will KDE 5 be ready?", your answer will be that our brand new desktop is already at version 5.1 and making swift progress! Stability is quite good, but there's work to do in the feature area. Distributions don't ship it as default yet.

If you ask for 'official packages from my distribution', most distributions, including Fedora, openSUSE and Kubuntu, have had packages since 5.0. The just-released openSUSE 13.2 ships with Plasma 4.11 (the latest and last version in the stable 4 series) as default desktop but has Plasma 5.1 as option, next to GNOME Shell, XFCE and everything else. Kubuntu similarly released with Plasma 4.11 and a tech preview with Plasma 5.1 simultaneously. Both have KDE Applications 4.14.x, as there is no release of the Frameworks based apps yet. openSUSE offers a repo with newer apps but they're unstable as popcorn in an oven.

"when will this be default in distributions?" might be your next question. A good estimate is that by Plasma 5.4, to be released in the 2nd quarter next year, distributions will move over to the new series. Kubuntu has already announced they will ship Plasma as default desktop in 15.04 and I expect others with a similar or later release date to follow suit.

How ready is it?

While progress has been very fast and the team has been focusing on the end user experience, there still are glitches and missing features. Many of the supporting apps and widgets are still being ported or optimized for the new environment. Klipper has seen awesome work by Martin Graßlin with help from the new KDE design team, work on KMix is in progress and things like HiDPI support aren't entirely fleshed out yet either.

I'd recommend moving over your work desktop or laptop for 5.4. Until then, help test and improve it to make sure it is ready for you! Use the experimental packages for openSUSE or Kubuntu for testing, or build your own. This is a good time to get involved as there are plenty of relatively simple yet very impact-full tasks waiting for volunteers!

What is KDE 5 and why do you call it 'Plasma'?

To talk about something you have to define it, and I realize that that is a a bit more complicated than it used to be. In July I blogged about the disappearance of the 'software compilation'. That term was introduced after we re-branded KDE to no longer be the product we made, but the people who made it.

To understand the relation, compare KDE to another organization which creates (among other things) software: Microsoft. Like KDE, they create products and technologies like Office (KDE makes Calligra), Windows (KDE develops Plasma), .NET (KDE releases Frameworks), C# (KDE uses C++). Nobody confuses Microsoft Office with Microsoft 8.1 so this should be easy enough, I hope!

Why the change?

We used to release our desktop, applications and libraries at once, the KDE releases. Unfortunately that created two problems:
  • It confused many users about what was needed to run KDE applications. Could you only run Amarok in KDE? Did you have to install all of KDE to use Krita? For advanced users, these are simple to answer, but on user forums they kept coming up and you'd hear users at conferences tell you they never tried Krita because they did not like KDE (meaning the desktop).
  • The KDE 4.0 release had been a disaster in part because we released all its components at the same time, while not all were of the same quality. Many of the applications had been ported almost a year before and were quite mature, while especially Plasma, the desktop, had undergone a serious rewrite and simply wasn't ready.

To deal with these two issues, we changed the meaning of "KDE" to be the people in our community and started talking about the separate products as what we released. That was still all released at once, so most users continued to talk about KDE 4.x

Today things are different. While the libraries (KDE Frameworks) are currently at version 5.4 (released monthly), Plasma is at 5.2 (released every 3 months) and the KDE Applications are at 4.14. The latter will release soon with a date-based name, as it is build on a mix of the 4.x series and the 5.x series of our libraries so a common version number just doesn't work.

Here's a view of how it all fits together:



What goes with what?

You might ask next: "what version of what goes with what?" - a fair question. Luckily, the distributions will mostly deal with these dependency questions for you!

Still, if you want, here is an overview of how the relations currently are.

Frameworks releases monthly, combining bug fixes and (small) features. You can use the latest, stability is very important for the Frameworks team and it should be perfectly safe. Of course, this introduces a bit of an issue for distributions, which often don't want to mix feature- and bugfix releases. I'm not sure how they will deal with this. The backwards compatibility of Frameworks should allow updating them like bug fixes, but we'll have to see who does what.

Plasma releases every 3 months and usually depends on the latest or latest -1 version of Frameworks at release time. It will work just fine with versions newer than what it depends on as minimum.

Applications is still in the 4.x series, but many applications are already ported to Frameworks and the first release (14.12) will come next month. The numbering will be year.month, so if the next release comes 4 months later, it will be 15.4. They, too, will probably require latest or latest -1 version of Frameworks when released.

As of today, most distributions stick with the latest version of Plasma in the 4.x series (that is 4.11) and the latest version of KDELibs in the 4.x series, 4.14 (technically 4.9 but the numbers have been kept in line with Applications to keep things simpler).

Bringing it all together:
if you want a stable system, stay on Plasma 4.11 with KDELibs and Applications 4.14 for now. If you want to try out the new tech, try Plasma 5.2, which depends on Frameworks 5.3. With Applications 4.14 - no newer release is out yet, but openSUSE offers regular git checkouts and they have been working quite well for me personally. Find instructions here.


Note:
The 4.x series has already been split up. If you run "KDE 4.14", you don't. The last official Platform release is 4.9 and Plasma is at 4.11. Only the applications have continued to release, and speeding up their release cycle, while the Platform has seen increasing version numbers to keep packaging easy.

by Jos Poortvliet at November 07, 2014 08:01 PM

Charles H. Schulz

The Document Foundation sets precedents & paves new opportunities for Free Software

These past weeks have marked a significant twist in the way the Document Foundation is supporting the LibreOffice project and in general, the Free and Open Source Software world. Three distinct pieces of news should indeed be put together in order to shed light on the way the Document Foundation is changing the way Free Software projects can work in order to grow and gain traction. In chronological order, here are the three announcements you should pay attention to:
– The Document Foundation opens a tender to develop a full viewer (and limited editor) for Android
CloudOn, a member of the Advisory Board of the Document Foundation and a very active contributor of code, releases its new, full touch-based document viewer and editor for the iPad, entirely based on LibreOffice.
– The Document Foundation extends its certification programme to migration and training professionals.

Put together, a new story is emerging. Part of it was expected since the beginning of the LibreOffice project, while other parts came up unexpectedly, yet welcome. Let me explain. The other day I was writing about the roles of Free and Open Source Foundations. The funny thing about that is that while some foundations have roles that are easy to understand, several others operate in ways that may not make immediate sense to all. It seems that the Document Foundation falls in this latter category.

The Document Foundation role is to support and grow the LibreOffice & Document Liberation project and promote Free Software and Open Standards. You will notice in this statement two key points; first, it is not directly the role of the Document Foundation to develop the LibreOffice code: the community of volunteers is in charge of that and second, the actual role of the foundation is actually to protect and cater to the community’s needs and logistics.

At this point, it should be clear that at least in the case of the Document Foundation, we don’t hire developers to work on LibreOffice. But we feel there’s a difference between being a non profit entity distributing t-shirts and an entity actually supporting and growing the project. As such, we have overcome the lack of skills and time to develop an Android client by dedicating resources to this development, enabling talented developers to work on this project during a fixed period of time and funded by the foundation. Clearly, if such a development had been so easy we would already have an Android version.

The second case is a bit different, but highlights that the licensing choices of the LibreOffice project do not make it some sort of project for hobbyists. Here, we have a dynamic startup investing in the codebase and in the project in order to bet its own business on LibreOffice. The result is a visually stunning, touch based document viewer and editor for the iPad; it is also the only client able to read and edit documents in OOXML, ODF and several other formats on this device. Is it proprietary? I’m afraid it is. But the important lesson here is on two levels: in order to create such a product, CloudOn had to invest heavily in the development of LibreOffice (i.e, make actual, sizable contributions to the LibreOffice codebase) and, despite everything we have heard in the past, our licensing scheme is flexible enough to accomodate many different kind of scenarios without ripping off the actual project from its resources and code.

Last but not least, the certification for migration and training professionals is an important announcement: by assessing a reasonable level of competence and knowledge on LibreOffice, the certification aims at turning the market into a readable and transparent set of service offerings the customers can choose from while benefiting from a real stamp of minimum quality to be expected.

The conclusion at this stage I take from these three announcements is that the Document Foundation moves into new territories that will ultimately help LibreOffice and the FOSS world in general. By setting these precedents, the Document Foundation finds ways to strengthen the business ecosystem and invest resources into much needed strategic initiatives. This is what an independent foundation can do for the community it stems from and it is a powerful, yet at times intriguing model that prompts a new thinking on Free and Open Source Software projects.

by Charles at November 07, 2014 04:39 PM

November 06, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Government open standards - the curious case of Microsoft and the minister - ComputerWeekly.com


ComputerWeekly.com

Government open standards - the curious case of Microsoft and the minister
ComputerWeekly.com
Most people would see little to argue with in the choice of a standard called the Open Document Format (ODF). It is widely used and respected, and is supported by the most popular word processor and spreadsheet products in the world – Microsoft's Word ...

November 06, 2014 11:04 AM

November 05, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Rusland verplicht open source - NU.nl


NU.nl

Rusland verplicht open source
NU.nl
Dit kan dus zowel de ODF (Open Document Format) als OOXML (Office OpenXML) zijn. Laatstgenoemde is oorspronkelijk door Office-producent Microsoft ontwikkeld en beide zijn officiële open standaarden. In de loop van komend jaar moeten de diverse ...

and more »

November 05, 2014 04:23 PM

November 04, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Departments lack common targets for implementing open-document standards - ComputerWeekly.com


ComputerWeekly.com

Departments lack common targets for implementing open-document standards
ComputerWeekly.com
However, ODF won't be implemented until 28 February 2018, with plans to be reviewed in 2016 to assess if it can be completed sooner. A spokesperson for the Treasury told Computer Weekly while the department can generate documents in the ODF format ...
DCLG to address open source obstaclesCivil Service World

all 2 news articles »

November 04, 2014 05:12 PM

[열린마당]한글 '워드' 안깔린 PC서도 민원 신청 OK - 한라일보


[열린마당]한글 '워드' 안깔린 PC서도 민원 신청 OK
한라일보
주민들이 행정기관 민원실에 많이 제출하는 민원 신청서와 공직에 지원하는 민간 전문가가 작성하는 개방형직위 응시원서에 대해 한글문서와 함께 '개방형 문서 서식(open document format, ODF)' 파일도 제공하고 있다. 방문민원 건수가 가장 많은 전입신고서(1088 ...

November 04, 2014 01:01 PM

DCLG to address open source obstacles - Civil Service World


Civil Service World

DCLG to address open source obstacles
Civil Service World
Also, the current version of Microsoft Office only supports the ODF 1.1 standard, and not all applications support the use of ODF formatted documents. The use of ODF needs to be integrated into business applications, the department added. A third phase ...
Departments lack common targets for implementing open-document standardsComputerWeekly.com

all 2 news articles »

November 04, 2014 12:26 PM

November 03, 2014

Apache Foundation

Call for talks: Open Document Editors Devroom at FOSDEM 15

FOSDEM 15 will be held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday, January 31, and Sunday, February 1st, 2015.

Open document editors are coming again to FOSDEM with a shared devroom which gives every project in this area a chance to present ODF related developments and innovations. The devroom is jointly organized by Apache OpenOffice and LibreOffice.

We invite submission of talks for the Open Document Editors devroom, to be held on Saturday, January 31, from 10AM to 6PM.

Length of talks should be limited to 20 minutes, as we would like to have questions after each presentation, and to fit as many presenters as possible in the schedule. Exceptions must be explicitly requested and justified.

Technical talks (code, extensions, localization, QA, tools and adoption related cases) about open document editors or the ODF document format are welcome.

Submissions must be done by the speakers using the Pentabarf system:
https://penta.fosdem.org/submission/FOSDEM15

While filing your proposal, please provide the title of your talk, a short abstract (one or two paragraphs), some information about yourself (name, bio and photo, but please do remember that your profile might be already stored at Pentabarf) and specify what topic (Apache OpenOffice, LibreOffice, other ODF editors, ODF in general...) your talk is about.

You do not need to create a new account if you already have one. If the password has been lost, you can easily recover it.

The deadline is Sunday, December 14, 2014. Accepted speakers will be notified by December 28, 2014.

You can send any questions to the devroom mailing list:
open-document-devroom-AT-lists.fosdem-DOT-org

by pescetti at November 03, 2014 10:23 PM

October 28, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

Rivoluzion​e informatic​a in Municipio - Legnanonews


Legnanonews

Rivoluzion​e informatic​a in Municipio
Legnanonews
Da oggi, nello scambio di documenti all'interno del Municipio con soggetti esterni, nell'invio di mail e nella pubblicazione di documenti sul portale comunale, verrà adottato il formato aperto ODF (Open Document Format). Un'altra importante novità è l ...

October 28, 2014 05:57 PM

October 27, 2014

Apache OpenOffice Blog

大里仁愛90天汰換辦公室軟體導入開源軟體省百萬授權費 - iThome Online


大里仁愛90天汰換辦公室軟體導入開源軟體省百萬授權費
iThome Online
檔案格式轉換上,OpenOffice預設的文件交換格式為ISO標準的開放文件格式(OpenDocument FormatODF),也可以轉成微軟Office及其他常見的檔案格式。 其他同樣導入OpenOffice的組織還有聯合報、臺中榮總醫院等,不過相較之下,廖啓志的作法更為果斷,整個 ...

October 27, 2014 02:28 AM

October 24, 2014

www.opendocsociety.org

Tenth ODF plugfest in London

Earlier this year the UK Cabinet Office officially adopted the Open Document Format as the office format of choice.The international document file format standard is expected to be used across all government bodies for sharing or collaborating on government documents. This will help create a level playing field for suppliers of all sizes, increase productivity and competitiveness and  make large cumulative savings for citizens, businesses and taxpayers.

We are excited to be able to announce that the UK Cabinet Office will be hosting the tenth ODF Plugfest on December 8th and 9th 2014 in London. The ODF plugfests are an ongoing series of vendor-neutral events, bringing together implementers and stakeholders of the standard.he goal is to achieve maximum interoperability by running scenario-based tests in a hands-on manner and discuss new and proposed features of the Open Document Format specification.

Lead architects from commercial and open source products, members of the OASIS ODF TC's and technical experts from national and regional governments will be present. Plugfests have been held in a number of countries across Europe since 2009, when the first ODF plugfest was launched in The Hague by the Netherlands Minister of Foreign Trade at the time, Frank Heemskerk.
10th ODF plugfest logo

October 24, 2014 11:14 AM

Google News

Il Comune di Legnano viaggia tutto in OpenOffice - AsseSempione.info


Il Comune di Legnano viaggia tutto in OpenOffice
AsseSempione.info
Da oggi, nello scambio di documenti all'interno del Municipio con soggetti esterni, nell'invio di mail e nella pubblicazione di documenti sul portale comunale, verrà adottato il formato aperto ODF (Open Document Format). Un'altra importante novità è l ...

October 24, 2014 09:11 AM

October 23, 2014

Google News

[WIS 2014 영상] 인프라웨어, 'PC용 폴라리스 오피스' 선보여 - Aving


[WIS 2014 영상] 인프라웨어, 'PC용 폴라리스 오피스' 선보여
Aving
또한 10월 말 출시될 정식버전에서는 ODF(Open document format)와 함께 MS의 PPT, Excel과 호환되는 슬라이드, 시트까지 지원된다. 이 외에도 다양한 업무환경을 지원할 수 있는 모바일 스캐너, 모바일 프린트, 전자칠판 솔루션 등을 비롯하여 기업용 모바일 보안 ...

October 23, 2014 07:05 AM

October 22, 2014

Google News

10 ways to help users move from Microsoft Office to LibreOffice - TechRepublic (blog)


TechRepublic (blog)

10 ways to help users move from Microsoft Office to LibreOffice
TechRepublic (blog)
There are extensions for each of the LibreOffice tools, including the likes of the Alternative dialog for Find/Replace and the Multi-format Save. These extensions help make .... ODF formats can be opened by MS Office 2007 SP2 and newer. My experience ...

October 22, 2014 10:21 AM

Planet KDE

Calligra Gemini - now also for Linux :)


Some people may remember earlier this year when Krita Gemini became (to my knowledge) the first open source software to become greenlit on Steam. For those who don't, yeah, that really happened ;) Krita Gemini was a project created in cooperation between the KDE community's Calligra team, the little software consultancy KO GmbH, and a large semiconductor manufacturer named Intel, who had some devices they needed to be able to show off. Krita Gemini is available on the Steam store, though not yet for Linux (as it turns out, Steam packaging for Linux is even more awkward than building stand-alone installers for Windows, an odd sort of situation for us used to sensible package managers)


Earlier this year (late April 2014) the team from KO and Calligra which built Krita Gemini had a teleconference with the Intel team, and we agreed that other applications would be well suited to a similar attention, and we came up with the idea of building Calligra Gemini, an application which would encapsulate Words and Stage, Calligra's word processor and presentation tool respectively, in the same way that Krita Gemini encapsulates Krita, with automatic switching between the existing desktop UX and a new touch friendly UX created for the purpose. Over the last little while, i've been posting builds on the project minisite (along with release notes and screenshots and such).


So now, with the initial work on that project reaching its conclusion, i decided that it was time to expose a few more people to it than what's been the case so far. So, over the course of this weekend, between making some tasty bread, cleaning and cooking dinner, i have been working on some packages for people who don't run Windows. Specifically, i have made a set of packages for openSUSE (just 13.1, in various guises, for now - others will follow), and they're available right here (and also shown on the project's minisite linked above)


Finally, i also released a short story i've been writing over the last couple of weeks (while waiting on the editors to get back to me on the novel i've also been working on). This is relevant here because i have been dogfooding; it was written entirely using Calligra Gemini, and the pdf and ePub versions were produced using the Calligra features as well. Finally, the work is stored in a git repository, which is also controlled by Calligra Gemini's support for using Git as cloud storage. The story is available as pdf and ePub on my deviantArt page :)

The word of the day is: Geiko

by Dan Leinir Turthra Jensen (leinir) at October 22, 2014 07:41 AM

WebODF news

Open Source Business Award 2014 for WebODF

Open Source Business Award 2014

Open Source Business Award 2014

The project WebODF has been awarded with the third price in the Open Source Business Award 2014 (OSBAR), selected out of 17 nominated projects.

October 22, 2014 12:00 AM

October 20, 2014

Google News

'폴라리스 오피스' 문서 SW 판도 바꾸나 - 아이뉴스24


아이뉴스24

'폴라리스 오피스' 문서 SW 판도 바꾸나
아이뉴스24
또 폴라리스 오피스는 MS오피스의 파워포인트(PPT), 엑셀(Excel)과 호환되는 슬라이드, 시트도 지원하고, 최근 공공기관 문서 표준화 움직임에 따라 공공기관에서 도입이 검토되고 있는 오픈도큐먼트포맷(ODF, Open Document Format)도 지원한다. ODF는 국제 ...
인프라웨어, 스마트워크 환경 솔루션 공개ajunews

all 9 news articles »

October 20, 2014 08:39 AM

'폴라리스 오피스' 문서 SW 판도 바꾸나 - 아이뉴스24


아이뉴스24

'폴라리스 오피스' 문서 SW 판도 바꾸나
아이뉴스24
또 폴라리스 오피스는 MS오피스의 파워포인트(PPT), 엑셀(Excel)과 호환되는 슬라이드, 시트도 지원하고, 최근 공공기관 문서 표준화 움직임에 따라 공공기관에서 도입이 검토되고 있는 오픈도큐먼트포맷(ODF, Open Document Format)도 지원한다. ODF는 국제 ...

October 20, 2014 08:39 AM

[BB-1020] 신형 맥미니, 메모리 업그레이드 불가 - 블로터닷넷


아이뉴스24

[BB-1020] 신형 맥미니, 메모리 업그레이드 불가
블로터닷넷
또한, 10월 말 출시될 정식버전에서는 ODF (Open document format)와 함께 MS의 PPT, Excel과 호환되는 슬라이드, 시트까지 지원합니다. 이 외에도 다양한 업무환경을 지원할 수 있는 모바일 스캐너, 모바일 프린트, 전자칠판 솔루션 등을 비롯하여 기업용 모바일 ...
'폴라리스 오피스' 문서 SW 판도 바꾸나아이뉴스24

all 9 news articles »

October 20, 2014 02:43 AM

인프라웨어 WIS, 참가스마트워크 환경 솔루션 공개 - 이투데이


인프라웨어 WIS, 참가스마트워크 환경 솔루션 공개
이투데이
또한, 10월 말 출시될 정식버전에서는 ODF (Open document format)와 함께 MS의 PPT, Excel과 호환되는 슬라이드, 시트까지 지원된다. 이 외에도 다양한 업무환경을 지원할 수 있는 모바일 스캐너, 모바일 프린트, 전자칠판 솔루션 등을 비롯하여 기업용 모바일 보 ...

October 20, 2014 01:39 AM

인프라웨어, 스마트워크 환경 솔루션 공개 - ajunews


ajunews

인프라웨어, 스마트워크 환경 솔루션 공개
ajunews
또한, 10월 말 출시될 정식버전에서는 ODF (Open document format)와 함께 MS의 PPT, Excel과 호환되는 슬라이드, 시트까지 지원된다. 이 외에도 다양한 업무환경을 지원할 수 있는 모바일 스캐너, 모바일 프린트, 전자칠판 솔루션 등을 비롯하여 기업용 모바일 보 ...

and more »

October 20, 2014 01:10 AM

October 16, 2014

Google News

Munich va-t-elle retourner à Windows ? Pour le maire de la ville, cela coûterait ... - Developpez.com


Munich va-t-elle retourner à Windows ? Pour le maire de la ville, cela coûterait ...
Developpez.com
Plaintes liées essentiellement à la compatibilité entre les formats utilisés dans OpenOffice et Microsoft Office. Compte tenu du fait que le format ODF ne soit pas adopté sur le plan national, la municipalité serait parfois confrontée à la manipulation ...

October 16, 2014 11:36 AM

October 15, 2014

www.opendocsociety.org

OpenDoc Society collaborates with UK Cabinet Office

OpenDoc Society has signed an agreement to work together with the Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO) of the UK Government Digital Service (GDS) to help the UK government migrate to OpenDocument Format. OCTO's goal is to equip government with the right technology to deliver great digital services.

The UK Cabinet Office announced the selection of the Open Document Format (ODF) for use across government for editable government documents in July 2014.

OpenDoc Society and GDS will collaborate on providing 'hands on' guidance to advise technology leaders in the UK government on how to implement and transition to ODF with the minimum of disruption for their users inside and outside of government.

The guidance will be primarily aimed at technology professionals in government who are managing the implementation of ODF in their organisation. It aims to provide the technical information required to implement/migrate to ODF with regards to software application management in an enterprise environment and integration with other tools, for example accessibility tools. We expect the result of this collaboration to be useful in helping technology professionals to devise implementation plans, build business cases and inform decision makers, project managers and trainers. This includes information that end users should find useful in avoiding interoperability issues across different software packages and software versions.

October 15, 2014 08:30 AM

October 14, 2014

ODF Wikipedia Page

PC-XT: fix tag typo; formatting: 5x link→cite web, 2x HTML entity, heading-style, link→cite news (using Advisor.js)

fix tag typo; formatting: 5x link→cite web, 2x HTML entity, heading-style, link→cite news (using Advisor.js)

← Previous revision Revision as of 18:23, 14 October 2014
Line 115: Line 115:
 
{{Main|OpenDocument technical specification}}
 
{{Main|OpenDocument technical specification}}
   
The most common [[filename extension]]s used for OpenDocument documents are:<ref>{{es icon}} [http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html UA.es]</ref><ref name="hg flat opendocument">{{cite web |url=http://www.ensode.net/roller/dheffelfinger/entry/openoffice_documents_version_control_with |title=OpenOffice.org Document Version Control With Mercurial |accessdate=7 June 2010}}</ref>
+
The most common [[filename extension]]s used for OpenDocument documents are:<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html|title=UA.es|work=ua.es|language=es}}</ref><ref name="hg flat opendocument">{{cite web |url=http://www.ensode.net/roller/dheffelfinger/entry/openoffice_documents_version_control_with |title=OpenOffice.org Document Version Control With Mercurial |accessdate=7 June 2010}}</ref>
   
 
* <code>.odt</code> and <code>.fodt</code> for [[word processing]] (text) documents
 
* <code>.odt</code> and <code>.fodt</code> for [[word processing]] (text) documents
Line 152: Line 152:
 
The OpenDocument format is used in [[free software]] and in [[proprietary software]].
 
The OpenDocument format is used in [[free software]] and in [[proprietary software]].
 
This includes [[office suites]] (both stand-alone and web-based) and individual applications such as word-processors, spreadsheets, presentation, and data management applications. Prominent office suites supporting OpenDocument fully or partially include:
 
This includes [[office suites]] (both stand-alone and web-based) and individual applications such as word-processors, spreadsheets, presentation, and data management applications. Prominent office suites supporting OpenDocument fully or partially include:
*[[AbiWord]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.abisource.com/wiki/OpenDocument_support|title=OpenDocument support|publisher=AbiSource community|work=AbiWord Wiki|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref><ref name="abiword">[http://www.abisource.com/release-notes/2.4.2.phtml Abiword 2.4.2 Release Notes.]. Retrieved 2009-03-03</ref>
+
*[[AbiWord]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.abisource.com/wiki/OpenDocument_support|title=OpenDocument support|publisher=AbiSource community|work=AbiWord Wiki|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref><ref name="abiword">{{cite web|url=http://www.abisource.com/release-notes/2.4.2.phtml|title=Abiword 2.4.2 Release Notes.|work=abisource.com|accessdate=2009-03-03}}</ref>
 
*[[Adobe Buzzword]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/buzzword/ |title=Adobe Buzzword online word processor from Acrobat.com |publisher=Labs.adobe.com |date= |accessdate=19 May 2009}}</ref>
 
*[[Adobe Buzzword]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/buzzword/ |title=Adobe Buzzword online word processor from Acrobat.com |publisher=Labs.adobe.com |date= |accessdate=19 May 2009}}</ref>
 
*[[Apache OpenOffice]]
 
*[[Apache OpenOffice]]
*[[Atlantis Word Processor]]<ref>[http://www.atlantiswordprocessor.com/en/news/1_6_5.htm Atlantis Word Processor 1.6.5 release notes]. Retrieved 2010-01-28</ref>
+
*[[Atlantis Word Processor]]<ref>{{cite news|url=http://www.atlantiswordprocessor.com/en/news/1_6_5.htm|title=Atlantis Word Processor 1.6.5 release notes|work=atlantiswordprocessor.com|accessdate=2010-01-28}}</ref>
 
*[[Calligra Suite]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.calligra-suite.org/words/ |title=Words |publisher=Calligra Suite |date= |accessdate=23 February 2012}}</ref>
 
*[[Calligra Suite]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.calligra-suite.org/words/ |title=Words |publisher=Calligra Suite |date= |accessdate=23 February 2012}}</ref>
 
*[[Corel Corporation|Corel]] [[Corel WordPerfect Office|WordPerfect Office X6]]<ref>{{cite web
 
*[[Corel Corporation|Corel]] [[Corel WordPerfect Office|WordPerfect Office X6]]<ref>{{cite web
Line 164: Line 164:
 
*[[Gnumeric]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://projects.gnome.org/gnumeric/doc/sect-file-formats.shtml|title=File Formats|author=Eric Baudais & others|publisher=GNOME Documentation Project|work=The Gnumeric Manual, version 1.10|date=February 2010|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
 
*[[Gnumeric]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://projects.gnome.org/gnumeric/doc/sect-file-formats.shtml|title=File Formats|author=Eric Baudais & others|publisher=GNOME Documentation Project|work=The Gnumeric Manual, version 1.10|date=February 2010|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
 
*[[Google Docs]]
 
*[[Google Docs]]
*[[IBM Lotus Symphony]]<ref name="register" /><ref>{{cite web|url=http://blogs.msdn.com/dmahugh/archive/2009/05/09/1-2-1.aspx |title=1 + 2 = 1?|author=Doug Mahugh|publisher=MSDN Blogs|date=10 May 2009<!-- 2:26 AM-->|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref><ref>[http://symphony.lotus.com/software/lotus/symphony/help.nsf/ReleaseNotes Symphony.lotus.com]</ref>
+
*[[IBM Lotus Symphony]]<ref name="register" /><ref>{{cite web|url=http://blogs.msdn.com/dmahugh/archive/2009/05/09/1-2-1.aspx |title=1 + 2 = 1?|author=Doug Mahugh|publisher=MSDN Blogs|date=10 May 2009<!-- 2:26 AM-->|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=http://symphony.lotus.com/software/lotus/symphony/help.nsf/ReleaseNotes|title=Symphony.lotus.com|work=symphony.lotus.com}}</ref>
 
*[[Inkscape]] exports .odg
 
*[[Inkscape]] exports .odg
*[[KOffice]]<ref>[http://koffice.org/filters/1.6/ Koffice.org]</ref>
+
*[[KOffice]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://koffice.org/filters/1.6/|title=Koffice.org|work=koffice.org}}</ref>
 
*[[LibreOffice]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[LibreOffice]]<ref name="register" />
 
*Microsoft Office 2003 and Office XP (with the Open Source OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://odf-converter.sourceforge.net/download.html#hRequirements|title=OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-ins for Office|accessdate={{Date|2014-01-31}}}}</ref>
 
*Microsoft Office 2003 and Office XP (with the Open Source OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://odf-converter.sourceforge.net/download.html#hRequirements|title=OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-ins for Office|accessdate={{Date|2014-01-31}}}}</ref>
Line 183: Line 183:
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
 
*[[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
   
Various organizations have announced development of conversion software (including ''plugins'' and ''filters'') to support OpenDocument on [[Microsoft]]'s products.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20060504015438308 | title=OpenDocument Foundation to MA: We Have a Plugin | date=4 May 2006 | accessdate=23 August 2006 | publisher=Groklaw}}</ref><ref>{{cite news | url=http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Microsoft_Office_to_get_a_dose_of_OpenDocument/0,130061733,139255766,00.htm | title=Microsoft Office to get a dose of OpenDocument | date=5 May 2006 | accessdate=6 December 2006|publisher=CNet}}</ref> {{asof|July 2007}}, there are nine packages of conversion software.<!--Commented out invalid reference <ref name="odf20070727"/>--> Microsoft first released support for the OpenDocument Format in Office 2007 SP2.<ref>{{cite web | title=Office 2007 SP2 Supports ODF | url=http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/164015/office_2007_sp2_supports_odf.html | date=28 April 2009 | publisher=PC World}}</ref> However, the implementation faced [[OpenDocument software#Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 support controversy|substantial criticism]] and the [[ODF Alliance]] and others claimed that the third party plugins provided better support.<ref name="sp2-fact-sheet">{{cite web | url=http://web.archive.org/web/20090611181719/http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf | title=Fact-sheet Microsoft ODF support | accessdate=24 May 2009 | quote=''MS Excel 2007 will process ODF spreadsheet documents when loaded via the Sun Plug-In 3.0 for MS Office or the SourceForge “OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office,” but will fail when using the “built-in” support provided by Office 2007 SP2.'' | publisher=odfalliance}}</ref> Microsoft Office 2010 can open and save OpenDocument Format documents natively, although not all features are supported.<ref>[http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/starter-help/differences-between-the-opendocument-text-odt-format-and-the-word-docx-format-HA010355788.aspx Differences between the OpenDocument Text (.odt) format and the Word (.docx) format]</ref>
+
Various organizations have announced development of conversion software (including ''plugins'' and ''filters'') to support OpenDocument on [[Microsoft]]'s products.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20060504015438308 | title=OpenDocument Foundation to MA: We Have a Plugin | date=4 May 2006 | accessdate=23 August 2006 | publisher=Groklaw}}</ref><ref>{{cite news | url=http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Microsoft_Office_to_get_a_dose_of_OpenDocument/0,130061733,139255766,00.htm | title=Microsoft Office to get a dose of OpenDocument | date=5 May 2006 | accessdate=6 December 2006|publisher=CNet}}</ref> {{asof|July 2007}}, there are nine packages of conversion software.<!--Commented out invalid reference <ref name="odf20070727"/>--> Microsoft first released support for the OpenDocument Format in Office 2007 SP2.<ref>{{cite web | title=Office 2007 SP2 Supports ODF | url=http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/164015/office_2007_sp2_supports_odf.html | date=28 April 2009 | publisher=PC World}}</ref> However, the implementation faced [[OpenDocument software#Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 support controversy|substantial criticism]] and the [[ODF Alliance]] and others claimed that the third party plugins provided better support.<ref name="sp2-fact-sheet">{{cite web | url=http://web.archive.org/web/20090611181719/http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf | title=Fact-sheet Microsoft ODF support | accessdate=24 May 2009 | quote=''MS Excel 2007 will process ODF spreadsheet documents when loaded via the Sun Plug-In 3.0 for MS Office or the SourceForge “OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office,” but will fail when using the “built-in” support provided by Office 2007 SP2.'' | publisher=odfalliance}}</ref> Microsoft Office 2010 can open and save OpenDocument Format documents natively, although not all features are supported.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/starter-help/differences-between-the-opendocument-text-odt-format-and-the-word-docx-format-HA010355788.aspx|title=Differences between the OpenDocument Text (.odt) format and the Word (.docx) format|work=office.microsoft.com}}</ref>
   
 
[[Mac OS X 10.5]] offers both a new [[TextEdit]] version and [[Quick Look]] feature supporting the OpenDocument Text format (albeit with some formatting loss).{{Clarify|date=October 2009}}
 
[[Mac OS X 10.5]] offers both a new [[TextEdit]] version and [[Quick Look]] feature supporting the OpenDocument Text format (albeit with some formatting loss).{{Clarify|date=October 2009}}
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Key contributor [[Sun Microsystems]] made an irrevocable intellectual property covenant, providing all implementers with the guarantee that Sun will not seek to enforce any of its enforceable U.S. or foreign patents against any implementation of the OpenDocument specification in which development Sun participates to the point of incurring an obligation.<ref name="SunOpenDocumentPatentStatement">{{cite web | url = http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/office/ipr.php | title = Sun OpenDocument Patent Statement | work = OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) TC | author = Microsystems, Inc. | publisher = OASIS foundation}}</ref>
 
Key contributor [[Sun Microsystems]] made an irrevocable intellectual property covenant, providing all implementers with the guarantee that Sun will not seek to enforce any of its enforceable U.S. or foreign patents against any implementation of the OpenDocument specification in which development Sun participates to the point of incurring an obligation.<ref name="SunOpenDocumentPatentStatement">{{cite web | url = http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/office/ipr.php | title = Sun OpenDocument Patent Statement | work = OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) TC | author = Microsystems, Inc. | publisher = OASIS foundation}}</ref>
   
A second contributor to ODF development, [[IBM]] &mdash; which, for instance, has contributed Lotus spreadsheet documentation<ref>{{cite web|url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200607/msg00076.html|title=Formula subcommittee status|author=David A. Wheeler|publisher=office@lists.oasis-open.org, office-formula@lists.oasis-open.org|date=21 Jul 2006<!-- 13:50:46 -0400 (EDT)-->|accessdate=12 September 2012}}</ref> &mdash; has made their patent rights available through their'' Interoperability Specifications Pledge'' in which "IBM irrevocably covenants to you that it will not assert any Necessary Claims against you for your making, using, importing, selling, or offering for sale Covered Implementations."<ref name="IBM-ISP-list">{{cite web|url=http://www-03.ibm.com/linux/ossstds/isplist.html|title=Interoperability Pledge Specification List|work=Interoperability Specifications Pledge|publisher=IBM Corp|date=12 December 2011|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
+
A second contributor to ODF development, [[IBM]] which, for instance, has contributed Lotus spreadsheet documentation<ref>{{cite web|url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200607/msg00076.html|title=Formula subcommittee status|author=David A. Wheeler|publisher=office@lists.oasis-open.org, office-formula@lists.oasis-open.org|date=21 Jul 2006<!-- 13:50:46 -0400 (EDT)-->|accessdate=12 September 2012}}</ref> has made their patent rights available through their'' Interoperability Specifications Pledge'' in which "IBM irrevocably covenants to you that it will not assert any Necessary Claims against you for your making, using, importing, selling, or offering for sale Covered Implementations."<ref name="IBM-ISP-list">{{cite web|url=http://www-03.ibm.com/linux/ossstds/isplist.html|title=Interoperability Pledge Specification List|work=Interoperability Specifications Pledge|publisher=IBM Corp|date=12 December 2011|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
   
 
The [[Software Freedom Law Center]] has [http://www.softwarefreedom.org/resources/2006/OpenDocument.html examined] whether there are any legal barriers to the use of the OpenDocument Format (ODF) in free and open source software arising from the standardization process. In their opinion ODF is free of legal encumbrances that would prevent its use in free and open source software, as distributed under licenses authored by Apache and the FSF.
 
The [[Software Freedom Law Center]] has [http://www.softwarefreedom.org/resources/2006/OpenDocument.html examined] whether there are any legal barriers to the use of the OpenDocument Format (ODF) in free and open source software arising from the standardization process. In their opinion ODF is free of legal encumbrances that would prevent its use in free and open source software, as distributed under licenses authored by Apache and the FSF.
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*Several organisations, such as the [http://opendocumentfellowship.com/ OpenDocument Fellowship] and [http://opendocsociety.org/ OpenDoc Society] were founded to support and promote OpenDocument.
 
*Several organisations, such as the [http://opendocumentfellowship.com/ OpenDocument Fellowship] and [http://opendocsociety.org/ OpenDoc Society] were founded to support and promote OpenDocument.
 
<!-- *The [http://www.oidi.org OIDI.org] (Open Interoperative Document Initiative) is committed to encouraging efforts by governments at all levels, around the globe, to implement changes necessary to ensure public documents are open and interoperable and thus available to all citizens/residents without the need for specific vendor software. -->
 
<!-- *The [http://www.oidi.org OIDI.org] (Open Interoperative Document Initiative) is committed to encouraging efforts by governments at all levels, around the globe, to implement changes necessary to ensure public documents are open and interoperable and thus available to all citizens/residents without the need for specific vendor software. -->
*The UK government has adopted ODF as the standard for all documents in the UK civil service <rev>{{cite web | url=https://www.gov.uk/government/news/open-document-formats-selected-to-meet-user-needs|title=Open document formats selected to meet user needs}} </ref>
+
*The UK government has adopted ODF as the standard for all documents in the UK civil service <ref>{{cite web | url=https://www.gov.uk/government/news/open-document-formats-selected-to-meet-user-needs|title=Open document formats selected to meet user needs}} </ref>
 
*The [[Wikimedia Foundation]] supports ODF export from [[MediaWiki]], which powers [[Wikipedia]] and a number of other Internet [[wiki]]-based sites.<ref>{{cite web | url= http://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Wikis_Go_Printable | title= Wikis Go Printable | work= [[Wikimedia Foundation]] | date= 13 December 2007 | accessdate= 31 December 2007}}</ref>
 
*The [[Wikimedia Foundation]] supports ODF export from [[MediaWiki]], which powers [[Wikipedia]] and a number of other Internet [[wiki]]-based sites.<ref>{{cite web | url= http://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Wikis_Go_Printable | title= Wikis Go Printable | work= [[Wikimedia Foundation]] | date= 13 December 2007 | accessdate= 31 December 2007}}</ref>
   
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* It is not permitted to use generic ODF formatting style elements (like font information) for the MathML elements.<ref name="doyourmath"/>
 
* It is not permitted to use generic ODF formatting style elements (like font information) for the MathML elements.<ref name="doyourmath"/>
   
== Worldwide adoption ==
+
==Worldwide adoption==
 
{{main|OpenDocument adoption}}
 
{{main|OpenDocument adoption}}
   

by PC-XT at October 14, 2014 06:23 PM

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[기고]한글'워드' 안 깔린 PC로도 민원 신청서 작성 OK - 제주의소리


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[기고]한글'워드' 안 깔린 PC로도 민원 신청서 작성 OK
제주의소리
주민들이 행정기관 민원실에 많이 제출하는 민원 신청서와 공직에 지원하는 민간 전문가가 작성하는 개방형직위 응시원서에 대해 한글문서와 함께 '개방형 문서 서식(open document format, ODF)' 파일도 제공하고 있다. 방문민원 건수가 가장 많은 전입신고서(1 ...
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October 14, 2014 12:45 AM