Planet ODF

April 29, 2020

HackerNews

April 08, 2020

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Revenue Strategy 2026: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE, Kamax Optic, Telecom Bridge, Zhejiang Chaoqian, Metros Communication, OPTOKON, ATC, FiberNet, Fycoo Electronics, Summit Telecom, Cheerwe, Kinsom, etc. - Science In Me

April 08, 2020 12:12 PM

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Revenue Strategy 2026: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE, Kamax Optic, Telecom Bridge, Zhejiang Chaoqian, Metros Communication, OPTOKON, ATC, FiberNet, Fycoo Electronics, Summit Telecom, Cheerwe, Kinsom, etc. - Curious Desk

April 08, 2020 11:06 AM

March 22, 2020

How a community came together to overcome the ODF challenge in Rajasthan's Thar desert - Down To Earth Magazine

March 22, 2020 07:00 AM

March 02, 2020

Strengthening and Training on ODF activities inaugurated in Jammu and Kashmir - All India Radio

March 02, 2020 08:00 AM

February 25, 2020

Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market: Dynamics, Segments, Size and Demand, 2019–2025 - News Parents

February 25, 2020 02:58 PM

January 27, 2020

HackerNews

January 10, 2020

OASIS

January 08, 2020

Latest trending report on Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market booming globally - Primo Journal

January 08, 2020 12:04 PM

Latest Newfangled report on Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market with outstanding growth to 2025 - Instanews247

January 08, 2020 12:01 PM

December 27, 2019

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Growth Analysis, Forecasts to 2025 : Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - Global Market Research 24

December 27, 2019 08:00 AM

December 16, 2019

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market 2019 – Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE, Kamax Optic - Daily Industry News Journal

December 16, 2019 07:10 PM

Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Global Market and Forecast 2019 – Hua Wei , 3M , Huber + Suhner , CommScope , SHKE - The Industry Reporter

December 16, 2019 01:52 PM

Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Global Market Demand and Forecast 2019 – Hua Wei , 3M , Huber + Suhner , CommScope , SHKE - Daily Industry News Journal

December 16, 2019 01:18 PM

November 30, 2019

Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame?ODF? market Business Scope & Development Factors | Key Players 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE, Kamax Optic - Daily Research Stack

November 30, 2019 10:06 AM

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: LibreOffice monthly recap: November 2019

Here’s our summary of updates, events and activities in the LibreOffice project in the last four weeks – click the links to learn more!

  • We got started with the Month of LibreOffice, November 2019. This is a campaign that we run every six months, crediting contributions all across the project. Everyone who helps the LibreOffice community during November can claim a sticker pack, and has a chance to win a cool glass mug. Today is the final day, so click the link to find out how to participate!

  • The OpenDocument Format (ODF) is the native file format in LibreOffice, and is used by other applications too. On November 7, we welcomed the release to OASIS of TC Committee Draft of ODF Version 1.3 for ratification. At the end of the process, ODF Version 1.3 will be submitted to ISO to become a standard. The final approval is expected in late 2020 or early 2021.

  • The LibreOffice Conference 2019 took place in Almeria, Spain in September, and we finished editing and uploading videos of presentations from the main room (auditorium). They’re all in the playlist, which you can browse below – click the button at the top to change to a different video:

Please confirm that you want to play a YouTube video. By accepting, you will be accessing content from YouTube, a service provided by an external third party.

YouTube privacy policy

If you accept this notice, your choice will be saved and the page will refresh.

  • Another community that was especially active this month was the Albanian LibreOffice community, who organised a localisation sprint and other events. We really appreciate their help – and our thoughts are with them, and the people of Albania, in the difficult times after the earthquake.

  • Over in Indonesia, Sokibi’s story tells us about advocacy of free software and LibreOffice at a local level. It’s wonderful to see people all around the world who are so passionate about open source and sharing knowledge!

  • The new LibreOffice Macro Team posted a progress report, detailing bugs fixed, help update and code contributions. Great work, everyone!

  • And finally, we had a local event update from Sofia, Bulgaria, where LibreOffice was present at OpenFest. Gabriele Ponzo describes his experiences there, and explains how other community members can get involved too.

Keep in touch – follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Mastodon. Like what we do? Support our community with a donation – or join us and help to make LibreOffice even better!

November 30, 2019 09:49 AM

November 27, 2019

OASIS

November 26, 2019

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market 2019 - Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - Montana Ledger

November 26, 2019 08:00 AM

ODF Wikipedia Page

Bender the Bot: /* Conception */HTTP → HTTPS for Wayback Machine, replaced: http://web.archive.org/ → https://web.archive.org/ (2)

Conception: HTTP → HTTPS for Wayback Machine, replaced: http://web.archive.org/ → https://web.archive.org/ (2)

← Previous revision Revision as of 01:52, 26 November 2019
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After responding to all written ballot comments, and a 30-day default ballot, the OpenDocument [[international standard]] went to publication in ISO, officially published 30 November 2006.
 
After responding to all written ballot comments, and a 30-day default ballot, the OpenDocument [[international standard]] went to publication in ISO, officially published 30 November 2006.
   
In 2006,<ref name=":0">{{Cite web|url=https://www.cnet.com/news/former-opendocument-advocates-bolt-for-w3c-standard/|title=Former OpenDocument advocates bolt for W3C standard|last=LaMonica|first=Martin|date=29 October 2007|website=[[CNET]]|publisher=[[CBS Interactive]]|url-status=live|archive-url=http://web.archive.org/web/20120418013056/http://news.cnet.com/8301-10784_3-9806369-7.html|archive-date=18 April 2012}}</ref> Garry Edwards, a member of OASIS TC since 2002,<ref name="Oasis_meeting">{{cite web|url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200212/msg00003.html|title=Meeting Minutes|date=December 16, 2002|publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]|accessdate=2007-11-01}}</ref> along with Sam Hiser, and Paul "Marbux" E. Merrell<ref name=":1">{{cite web|url=http://www.robweir.com/blog/2007/10/cracks-in-foundation.html|title=Cracks in the foundation|last=Weir|first=Rob|date=7 October 2007|website=An Antic Disposition|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=}}</ref> founded the OpenDocument Foundation. The aim of this project was be open-source representative of the format in OASIS.<ref name=":0" /><ref name=":1" /> The immediate aim of this project was to develop software that would convert legacy [[Microsoft Office]] documents to ODF. By October 2007 the project was a failure: Conversion of Microsoft Office documents could not be achieved.<ref name=":0" /> By this time, The foundation was convinced that ODF was not moving in a direction that they supported.<ref name=":2">{{cite web|url=https://www.zdnet.com/article/odf-infighting-could-help-microsofts-ooxml/|title=ODF infighting could help Microsoft's OOXML|last=Foley|first=Mary Jo|authorlink=Mary Jo Foley|date=29 October 2007|work=[[ZDNet]]|publisher=[[CBS Interactive]]|url-status=live <!--but its links aren't working properly-->|archive-url=http://web.archive.org/web/20071223005220/http://blogs.zdnet.com/microsoft/?p=875|archive-date=23 December 2007}}</ref> As a result, it announced the decision to abandon its namesake format in favor of [[W3C]]'s [[Compound Document Format]] (CDF), which was in early stages of its development.<ref name=":2" /><ref name=":0" /> The foundation, however, never acted on this decision and was soon dissolved. The CDF was never designed for this purpose either.<ref name="andy1">{{cite web|url=http://www.consortiuminfo.org/standardsblog/article.php?story=20071109070012244|title=Putting the OpenDocument Foundation to Bed (without its supper)|last=Updegrove|first=Andrew|date=9 November 2007|website=ConsortiumInfo.org|publisher=|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=}}</ref>
+
In 2006,<ref name=":0">{{Cite web|url=https://www.cnet.com/news/former-opendocument-advocates-bolt-for-w3c-standard/|title=Former OpenDocument advocates bolt for W3C standard|last=LaMonica|first=Martin|date=29 October 2007|website=[[CNET]]|publisher=[[CBS Interactive]]|url-status=live|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20120418013056/http://news.cnet.com/8301-10784_3-9806369-7.html|archive-date=18 April 2012}}</ref> Garry Edwards, a member of OASIS TC since 2002,<ref name="Oasis_meeting">{{cite web|url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200212/msg00003.html|title=Meeting Minutes|date=December 16, 2002|publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]|accessdate=2007-11-01}}</ref> along with Sam Hiser, and Paul "Marbux" E. Merrell<ref name=":1">{{cite web|url=http://www.robweir.com/blog/2007/10/cracks-in-foundation.html|title=Cracks in the foundation|last=Weir|first=Rob|date=7 October 2007|website=An Antic Disposition|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=}}</ref> founded the OpenDocument Foundation. The aim of this project was be open-source representative of the format in OASIS.<ref name=":0" /><ref name=":1" /> The immediate aim of this project was to develop software that would convert legacy [[Microsoft Office]] documents to ODF. By October 2007 the project was a failure: Conversion of Microsoft Office documents could not be achieved.<ref name=":0" /> By this time, The foundation was convinced that ODF was not moving in a direction that they supported.<ref name=":2">{{cite web|url=https://www.zdnet.com/article/odf-infighting-could-help-microsofts-ooxml/|title=ODF infighting could help Microsoft's OOXML|last=Foley|first=Mary Jo|authorlink=Mary Jo Foley|date=29 October 2007|work=[[ZDNet]]|publisher=[[CBS Interactive]]|url-status=live <!--but its links aren't working properly-->|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20071223005220/http://blogs.zdnet.com/microsoft/?p=875|archive-date=23 December 2007}}</ref> As a result, it announced the decision to abandon its namesake format in favor of [[W3C]]'s [[Compound Document Format]] (CDF), which was in early stages of its development.<ref name=":2" /><ref name=":0" /> The foundation, however, never acted on this decision and was soon dissolved. The CDF was never designed for this purpose either.<ref name="andy1">{{cite web|url=http://www.consortiuminfo.org/standardsblog/article.php?story=20071109070012244|title=Putting the OpenDocument Foundation to Bed (without its supper)|last=Updegrove|first=Andrew|date=9 November 2007|website=ConsortiumInfo.org|publisher=|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=}}</ref>
   
 
=== Further standardization ===
 
=== Further standardization ===

by Bender the Bot at November 26, 2019 01:52 AM

November 25, 2019

HackerNews

November 22, 2019

52 municipalities in West Bengal yet to achieve ODF status - The New Indian Express

November 22, 2019 08:00 AM

November 21, 2019

Floor Mount Optical Distribution Frame?ODF? Market Report – Global Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2019 – 2025 - Kentucky Reports

November 21, 2019 11:32 AM

November 17, 2019

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Growth 2019-2025: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - The World Industry News

November 17, 2019 08:00 AM

November 15, 2019

Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Size Increasing Popularity to Boost Growth by 2024 - Industry Updates Daily

November 15, 2019 04:49 PM

Floor Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Size Drivers 2019- Industry Analysis, Regional Outlook and Segmented Analysis 2024 - Industry Updates Daily

November 15, 2019 04:13 PM

November 14, 2019

Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market – Uncertainty Prevails|Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope - Tech Admirers

November 14, 2019 06:47 PM

November 13, 2019

ODF Wikipedia Page

ClueBot NG: Reverting possible vandalism by 66.90.255.250 to version by ClareTheSharer. Report False Positive? Thanks, ClueBot NG. (3672449) (Bot)

Reverting possible vandalism by 66.90.255.250 to version by ClareTheSharer. Report False Positive? Thanks, ClueBot NG. (3672449) (Bot)

← Previous revision Revision as of 21:56, 13 November 2019
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* The ODF specification for tracked changes is limited and does not fully specify all cases, resulting in implementation-specific behaviors.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://blogs.msdn.com/dmahugh/archive/2009/05/13/tracked-changes.aspx | title=Tracked Changes | author=Doug Mahugh (Microsoft) | date=13 May 2009}}</ref> In addition, OpenDocument does not support change tracking in elements like tables or [[MathML]].<ref name="doyourmath">{{cite web | url=http://idippedut.dk/post/Do-your-math-OOXML-and-OMML | title=Do your math - OOXML and OMML (Updated 2008-02-12) | author=Jesper Lund Stocholm (Danish ISO/IEC representative) | date=12 December 2008 | url-status=bot: unknown | archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20160326225935/http://idippedut.dk/post/Do-your-math-OOXML-and-OMML | archivedate=26 March 2016 | df=dmy-all }}</ref>
 
* The ODF specification for tracked changes is limited and does not fully specify all cases, resulting in implementation-specific behaviors.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://blogs.msdn.com/dmahugh/archive/2009/05/13/tracked-changes.aspx | title=Tracked Changes | author=Doug Mahugh (Microsoft) | date=13 May 2009}}</ref> In addition, OpenDocument does not support change tracking in elements like tables or [[MathML]].<ref name="doyourmath">{{cite web | url=http://idippedut.dk/post/Do-your-math-OOXML-and-OMML | title=Do your math - OOXML and OMML (Updated 2008-02-12) | author=Jesper Lund Stocholm (Danish ISO/IEC representative) | date=12 December 2008 | url-status=bot: unknown | archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20160326225935/http://idippedut.dk/post/Do-your-math-OOXML-and-OMML | archivedate=26 March 2016 | df=dmy-all }}</ref>
 
* It is not permitted to use generic ODF formatting style elements (like font information) for the MathML elements.<ref name="doyourmath"/>
 
* It is not permitted to use generic ODF formatting style elements (like font information) for the MathML elements.<ref name="doyourmath"/>
pee poopoo
 
   
 
==Adoption==
 
==Adoption==

by ClueBot NG at November 13, 2019 09:56 PM

66.90.255.250: /* Response */

Response

← Previous revision Revision as of 21:56, 13 November 2019
Line 237: Line 237:
 
* The ODF specification for tracked changes is limited and does not fully specify all cases, resulting in implementation-specific behaviors.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://blogs.msdn.com/dmahugh/archive/2009/05/13/tracked-changes.aspx | title=Tracked Changes | author=Doug Mahugh (Microsoft) | date=13 May 2009}}</ref> In addition, OpenDocument does not support change tracking in elements like tables or [[MathML]].<ref name="doyourmath">{{cite web | url=http://idippedut.dk/post/Do-your-math-OOXML-and-OMML | title=Do your math - OOXML and OMML (Updated 2008-02-12) | author=Jesper Lund Stocholm (Danish ISO/IEC representative) | date=12 December 2008 | url-status=bot: unknown | archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20160326225935/http://idippedut.dk/post/Do-your-math-OOXML-and-OMML | archivedate=26 March 2016 | df=dmy-all }}</ref>
 
* The ODF specification for tracked changes is limited and does not fully specify all cases, resulting in implementation-specific behaviors.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://blogs.msdn.com/dmahugh/archive/2009/05/13/tracked-changes.aspx | title=Tracked Changes | author=Doug Mahugh (Microsoft) | date=13 May 2009}}</ref> In addition, OpenDocument does not support change tracking in elements like tables or [[MathML]].<ref name="doyourmath">{{cite web | url=http://idippedut.dk/post/Do-your-math-OOXML-and-OMML | title=Do your math - OOXML and OMML (Updated 2008-02-12) | author=Jesper Lund Stocholm (Danish ISO/IEC representative) | date=12 December 2008 | url-status=bot: unknown | archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20160326225935/http://idippedut.dk/post/Do-your-math-OOXML-and-OMML | archivedate=26 March 2016 | df=dmy-all }}</ref>
 
* It is not permitted to use generic ODF formatting style elements (like font information) for the MathML elements.<ref name="doyourmath"/>
 
* It is not permitted to use generic ODF formatting style elements (like font information) for the MathML elements.<ref name="doyourmath"/>
  +
pee poopoo
   
 
==Adoption==
 
==Adoption==

by 66.90.255.250 at November 13, 2019 09:56 PM

November 09, 2019

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market 2019 – Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE, Kamax Optic - Avon Lake Ledger

November 09, 2019 08:00 AM

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Growth 2019-2025: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - Global Market Research 24

November 09, 2019 04:04 AM

November 07, 2019

Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market 2019-2024 : Global Key Players Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE, Kamax Optic - Industry Updates Daily

November 07, 2019 04:33 PM

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: The Document Foundation welcomes the release to OASIS of the TC Committee Draft of ODF Version 1.3 for ratification

Editor of the new version of the ODF standard document format sponsored by the Community of ODF Specification Maintainers (COSM) *

Berlin, November 7, 2019 – The Document Foundation welcomes the release to OASIS of TC Committee Draft of ODF Version 1.3 for ratification. At the end of the process, ODF Version 1.3 will be submitted to ISO to become a standard. The final approval is expected in late 2020 or early 2021.

Editing of ODF Version 1.3 Committee Draft has been sponsored by the Community of ODF Specification Maintainers (COSM), a project launched by The Document Foundation in 2017 with the donation of a seed of euro 10,000 to get the COSM project started, plus up to euro 20,000 to match each euro donated by other stakeholders.

So far, the COSM project has been backed by Microsoft, Collabora, the UK Government Digital Services, CIB, the European Commission’s StandICT project and Open-Xchange. The money has been used to pay an editor to finalize the ODF 1.3 specification and manage it through the OASIS review and ratification process.

Major new features of ODF 1.3 are digital signature and OpenPGP-based XML encryption of documents, plus several improvements to features already available in ODF 1.2 like new polynomial and moving average regression types for charts, a new specification for number of decimal digits in number formatting, a special header/footer style for first page of documents, contextual spacing for paragraphs, additional type argument values for the WEEKDAY function, and the new text master template document type. Most of these new features have been contributed by developers at CIB, Collabora, Microsoft and The Document Foundation.

“The third revision of ODF is now well on the way to becoming a ratified standard and confirms that the crowdfunding approach TDF seeded at COSM is an effective way to have the open document standard maintained without needing a deep-pocketed international corporation behind them”, said Thorsten Behrens, TDF board member.

November 07, 2019 11:05 AM

November 05, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: Tender for consultancy on implementing ODF 1.3 conformance in LibreOffice (#201911-01)

The Document Foundation (TDF), the charitable entity behind the world’s leading free office suite LibreOffice, seeks for companies or individuals to

provide consultancy on implementing ODF 1.3 conformance in LibreOffice

to start work as soon as possible. TDF is looking for an individual or company to give technical consultancy on ensuring that LibreOffice will properly implement the Open Document Format (ODF) version 1.3 for both importing and exporting. This can involve one or more of the following tasks:

Required skills

  • Extensive knowledge of C++
  • Experience working on the LibreOffice source code
  • Experience with implementing and testing the Open Document Format

We exclusively use free, libre and open source (FLOSS) software for development wherever possible, and the resulting work must be licensed under the Mozilla Public License v2.0.

Other skills

  • English (conversationally fluent in order to coordinate and plan with members of TDF)

TDF welcomes applications from all suitably qualified persons regardless of their race, sex, disability, religion/belief, sexual orientation or age.

Bidders will get a preference for including a partner or independent developer who has not been involved in a successful tender before.

As always, TDF will give some preference to individuals who have previously shown a commitment to TDF, including but not limited to certified developers and/or members of TDF. Not being a member, or never having contributed before, does not exclude any applicants from consideration.

The task offered is a project-based one-off, with no immediate plans to a mid- or long-term contractual relationship. It is offered on a freelance, project basis. Individuals and companies applying can be located anywhere in the world.

TDF is looking forward to receiving your applications for one or more of the aforementioned tasks, your financial expectations and the earliest date of your availability, via e-mail to a committee at tender20191101@documentfoundation.org no later than November 15, 2019.

Applicants who have not received feedback by November 29, 2019, should consider that their application, after careful review, was not accepted.

Additional information as per 2019-11-06: When budgeting, we anticipated that this project to take in the region of 20 (twenty) days of work

November 05, 2019 01:25 PM

November 02, 2019

Government survey shows 90% villages ODF free - Hindustan Times

November 02, 2019 07:00 AM

November 01, 2019

December 31 set as new deadline for urban India to get ODF status - Economic Times

November 01, 2019 07:00 AM

October 30, 2019

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market 2019 – Hua Wei , 3M , Huber + Suhner , CommScope , SHKE - The Industry Reporter

October 30, 2019 07:38 AM

October 23, 2019

HackerNews

October 20, 2019

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market 2019 – Hua Wei , 3M , Huber + Suhner , CommScope , SHKE , Kamax Optic - The Industry Reporter

October 20, 2019 02:36 PM

October 18, 2019

Slashdot

Canonical Releases Ubuntu Linux 19.10 Eoan Ermine with GNOME 3.34, Light Theme, and Raspberry Pi 4 Support

Following the beta period, one of the best and most popular Linux-based desktop operating systems reaches a major milestone -- you can now download Ubuntu 19.10! Code-named "Eoan Ermine", the distro is better and faster then ever. From a report: By default, Ubuntu 19.10 comes with one of the greatest desktop environments -- GNOME 3.34. In addition, users will be delighted by an all-new optional Yaru light theme. There is even baked-in support for the Raspberry Pi 4. The kernel is based on Linux 5.3 and comes with support for AMD Navi GPUs. There are plenty of excellent pre-installed programs too, such as LibreOffice 6.3, Firefox 69, and Thunderbird 68. While many users will be quick to install Google Chrome, I would suggest giving Firefox a try -- it has improved immensely lately. "With GNOME 3.34, Ubuntu 19.10 is the fastest release yet with significant performance improvements delivering a more responsive and smooth experience, even on older hardware. App organization is easier with the ability to drag and drop icons into categorized folders, while users can select light or dark Yaru theme variants depending on their preference or for improved viewing accessibility. Native support for ZFS on the root partition is introduced as an experimental desktop installer option. Coupled with the new zsys package, benefits include automated snapshots of file system states, allowing users to boot to a previous update and easily roll forwards and backwards in case of failure," says Canonical.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

by msmash at October 18, 2019 06:50 PM

October 16, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: FOSDEM 2020: Open Document Editors DevRoom Call for Papers

FOSDEM is one of the largest gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and happens each year in Brussels (Belgium) at the ULB Campus Solbosch. In 2020, it will be held on Saturday, February 1, and Sunday, February 2.

The Open Document Editors (OFE) DevRoom is scheduled for Saturday, February 1, from 10:30AM to 7PM. Physical room has not yet been assigned by FOSDEM. The shared devroom gives all project in this area a chance to present ODF related developments and innovations.

We are now inviting proposals for talks about Open Document Editors or the ODF document format, on topics such as code, extensions, localization, QA, UX, tools and adoption related cases. This is a unique opportunity to show new ideas and developments to a wide technical audience.

Length of talks should be limited to a maximum of 20 minutes, as we would like to have questions after each presentation, and to fit as many presenters as possible in the schedule. Exceptions must be explicitly requested and justified. You may be assigned LESS time than you request.

All submissions have to be made in the Pentabarf event planning tool: https://penta.fosdem.org/submission/FOSDEM20.
While filing your proposal, please provide the title of your talk, a short abstract (one or two paragraphs), some information about yourself (name, bio and photo).

To submit your talk, click on “Create Event”, then make sure to select the “Open Document Editors” devroom as the “Track”. Otherwise your talk will not be even considered for any devroom at all.

If you already have a Pentabarf account from a previous year, even if your talk was not accepted, please reuse it. Create an account if, and only if, you don’t have one from a previous year. If you have any issues with Pentabarf, please contact ode-devroom-manager@fosdem.org.

The deadline is Saturday, November 30, 2019. Accepted speakers will be notified by Sunday, December 8th, 2019. The DevRoom schedule will be published by Tuesday, December 12, 2019.

Recording permission

The talks in the Open Document Editors DevRoom will be audio and video recorded, and possibly streamed live too.
In the “Submission notes” field, please indicate that you agree that your presentation will be licensed under the CC-BY-SA-4.0 or CC-BY-4.0 license and that you agree to have your presentation recorded. For example: “If my speech is accepted for FOSDEM, I hereby agree to license all recordings, slides, and other associated materials under the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 4.0 International License. Sincerely, Name”.

October 16, 2019 09:09 AM

October 14, 2019

ODF Wikipedia Page

ClareTheSharer: /* Future */ Link TDF

Future: Link TDF

← Previous revision Revision as of 19:34, 14 October 2019
Line 149: Line 149:
   
 
===Future===
 
===Future===
* '''''OpenDocument 1.3''''': As of September 2019, version 1.3 of the OpenDocument specification has been made available as a public review draft of version 1.3, with a review period ending October 25, 2019<ref>{{cite web |title=Invitation to comment on Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) Version 1.3 - ends Oct. 25th |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/news/announcements/invitation-to-comment-on-open-document-format-for-office-applications-opendocumen |website=OASIS |accessdate=14 October 2019}}</ref>. The specification was completed as the result of the COSM crowdfunding project seeded by The Document Foundation<ref>{{cite web |title=The COSM Project at Public Software |url=https://publicsoftware.eu/members/cosm-project/ |publisher=Public Software CIC |accessdate=14 October 2019}}</ref>.
+
* '''''OpenDocument 1.3''''': As of September 2019, version 1.3 of the OpenDocument specification has been made available as a public review draft of version 1.3, with a review period ending October 25, 2019<ref>{{cite web |title=Invitation to comment on Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) Version 1.3 - ends Oct. 25th |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/news/announcements/invitation-to-comment-on-open-document-format-for-office-applications-opendocumen |website=OASIS |accessdate=14 October 2019}}</ref>. The specification was completed as the result of the COSM crowdfunding project seeded by [[The Document Foundation]]<ref>{{cite web |title=The COSM Project at Public Software |url=https://publicsoftware.eu/members/cosm-project/ |publisher=Public Software CIC |accessdate=14 October 2019}}</ref>.
 
* The OASIS Advanced Document Collaboration subcommittee (created in December, 2010) is working on an update of OpenDocument change-tracking that will not only enhance the existing change-tracking feature set, but also lay the foundation for the standardization of [[Collaborative real-time editor|real-time collaboration]] by making change tracking compatible with real-time collaboration.<ref>{{citation |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office-collab |title=OpenDocument - Advanced Document Collaboration SC |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=http://www.robweir.com/blog/2010/12/odf-tc-creates-advanced-document-collaboration-subcommittee.html |title=ODF TC Creates Advanced Document Collaboration Subcommittee |date=2010-12-05 |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=https://fosdem.org/2014/schedule/event/real_time_compatible_odf_change_tracking/ |title=Real-time compatible ODF change-tracking |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref>
 
* The OASIS Advanced Document Collaboration subcommittee (created in December, 2010) is working on an update of OpenDocument change-tracking that will not only enhance the existing change-tracking feature set, but also lay the foundation for the standardization of [[Collaborative real-time editor|real-time collaboration]] by making change tracking compatible with real-time collaboration.<ref>{{citation |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office-collab |title=OpenDocument - Advanced Document Collaboration SC |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=http://www.robweir.com/blog/2010/12/odf-tc-creates-advanced-document-collaboration-subcommittee.html |title=ODF TC Creates Advanced Document Collaboration Subcommittee |date=2010-12-05 |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=https://fosdem.org/2014/schedule/event/real_time_compatible_odf_change_tracking/ |title=Real-time compatible ODF change-tracking |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref>
   

by ClareTheSharer at October 14, 2019 07:34 PM

ClareTheSharer: /* Future */ 1.3 is out for public review

Future: 1.3 is out for public review

← Previous revision Revision as of 14:59, 14 October 2019
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===Future===
 
===Future===
  +
* '''''OpenDocument 1.3''''': As of September 2019, version 1.3 of the OpenDocument specification has been made available as a public review draft of version 1.3, with a review period ending October 25, 2019<ref>{{cite web |title=Invitation to comment on Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) Version 1.3 - ends Oct. 25th |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/news/announcements/invitation-to-comment-on-open-document-format-for-office-applications-opendocumen |website=OASIS |accessdate=14 October 2019}}</ref>. The specification was completed as the result of the COSM crowdfunding project seeded by The Document Foundation<ref>{{cite web |title=The COSM Project at Public Software |url=https://publicsoftware.eu/members/cosm-project/ |publisher=Public Software CIC |accessdate=14 October 2019}}</ref>.
* '''''OpenDocument 1.3''''' (a.k.a. "ODF-Next") As of January, 2014, the current state of a possible future version of OpenDocument specification is a working draft (a preliminary unapproved sketch, outline, or version of the specification). The OASIS Advanced Document Collaboration subcommittee (created in December, 2010) is working on an update of OpenDocument change-tracking that will not only enhance the existing change-tracking feature set, but also lay the foundation for the standardization of [[Collaborative real-time editor|real-time collaboration]] by making change tracking compatible with real-time collaboration.<ref>{{citation |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office-collab |title=OpenDocument - Advanced Document Collaboration SC |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=http://www.robweir.com/blog/2010/12/odf-tc-creates-advanced-document-collaboration-subcommittee.html |title=ODF TC Creates Advanced Document Collaboration Subcommittee |date=2010-12-05 |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=https://fosdem.org/2014/schedule/event/real_time_compatible_odf_change_tracking/ |title=Real-time compatible ODF change-tracking |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref>
+
* The OASIS Advanced Document Collaboration subcommittee (created in December, 2010) is working on an update of OpenDocument change-tracking that will not only enhance the existing change-tracking feature set, but also lay the foundation for the standardization of [[Collaborative real-time editor|real-time collaboration]] by making change tracking compatible with real-time collaboration.<ref>{{citation |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office-collab |title=OpenDocument - Advanced Document Collaboration SC |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=http://www.robweir.com/blog/2010/12/odf-tc-creates-advanced-document-collaboration-subcommittee.html |title=ODF TC Creates Advanced Document Collaboration Subcommittee |date=2010-12-05 |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=https://fosdem.org/2014/schedule/event/real_time_compatible_odf_change_tracking/ |title=Real-time compatible ODF change-tracking |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref>
   
 
==Application support==
 
==Application support==

by ClareTheSharer at October 14, 2019 02:59 PM

October 13, 2019

Mujasa: First Lucknow village declared ODF - The New Indian Express

October 13, 2019 07:00 AM

October 12, 2019

ODF Wikipedia Page

Flowing dreams: Merged from OpenDocument Foundation in compliance with AfD discussion

Merged from OpenDocument Foundation in compliance with AfD discussion

← Previous revision Revision as of 10:20, 12 October 2019
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There is a comprehensive set of example documents in OpenDocument format available.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://testsuite.opendocumentfellowship.com/|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20110830170930/http://testsuite.opendocumentfellowship.com/ |archivedate=30 August 2011 |title=OpenDocument Sample Documents|year=2006|publisher=[[Intel Corporation]]|accessdate= 12 December 2012|url-status=dead}}</ref> The whole test suite is available under the [[Creative Commons licenses|Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 license]].
 
There is a comprehensive set of example documents in OpenDocument format available.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://testsuite.opendocumentfellowship.com/|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20110830170930/http://testsuite.opendocumentfellowship.com/ |archivedate=30 August 2011 |title=OpenDocument Sample Documents|year=2006|publisher=[[Intel Corporation]]|accessdate= 12 December 2012|url-status=dead}}</ref> The whole test suite is available under the [[Creative Commons licenses|Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 license]].
   
==Standardization==
+
==History==
 
{{Main article|OpenDocument standardization}}
 
{{Main article|OpenDocument standardization}}
   
  +
=== Conception ===
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the OASIS ([[Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]]) industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems. The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002; OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] 28 August 2001.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.open-std.org/keld/iso26300-odf/dkuug-std-010828.pdf | title=Meeting agenda for DKUUG STD 2001-08-28 – item 5.6 | accessdate=13 March 2015}}</ref>
+
The OpenDocument standard was developed by a Technical Committee (TC) under the [[OASIS (organization)|Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] (OASIS) industry consortium. The ODF-TC has members from a diverse set of companies and individuals. Active TC members have voting rights. Members associated with Sun and IBM have sometimes had a large voting influence.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/membership.php?wg_abbrev=office | title=OpenDocument TC's {{Sic|hide=y|publicly|-}}visible membership roster | accessdate=3 November 2007}}</ref> The standardization process involved the developers of many office suites or related document systems.
  +
  +
The first official ODF-TC meeting to discuss the standard was 16 December 2002. OASIS approved OpenDocument as an OASIS standard on 1 May 2005. OASIS submitted the ODF specification to [[ISO/IEC JTC1|ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1]] (JTC 1) on 16 November 2005, under Publicly Available Specification (PAS) rules. ISO/IEC standardization for an open document standard including text, spreadsheet and presentation was proposed for the first time in [[DKUUG]] 28 August 2001.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.open-std.org/keld/iso26300-odf/dkuug-std-010828.pdf | title=Meeting agenda for DKUUG STD 2001-08-28 – item 5.6 | accessdate=13 March 2015}}</ref>
   
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=<!--what the title actually says: "ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Information Technology -->Document Description and Processing Languages-->Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 – Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]] | url-status=dead | archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20060519180809/http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | archivedate=19 May 2006 | df=dmy-all }}</ref>
 
After a six-month review period, on 3 May 2006, OpenDocument unanimously passed its six-month DIS (Draft International Standard) ballot in [[JTC 1]] ([[ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34]]), with broad participation,<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | title=<!--what the title actually says: "ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Information Technology -->Document Description and Processing Languages-->Summary of Voting on DIS ISO/IEC 26300 – Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.0 | date=13 June 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | author=ISO/IEC SC34 Secretariat | work=ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 34 Document Repository | archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20061001180333/http://www.jtc1sc34.org/repository/0728revc.htm | archivedate = 1 October 2006}}</ref> after which the OpenDocument specification was "approved for release as an ISO and IEC International Standard" under the name ISO/IEC 26300:2006.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | title=ISO and IEC approve OpenDocument OASIS standard for data interoperability of office applications | date=8 May 2006 | accessdate=24 August 2006 | work=ISO Press Releases | publisher=[[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]] | url-status=dead | archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20060519180809/http://www.iso.org/iso/en/commcentre/pressreleases/2006/Ref1004.html | archivedate=19 May 2006 | df=dmy-all }}</ref>
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After responding to all written ballot comments, and a 30-day default ballot, the OpenDocument [[international standard]] went to publication in ISO, officially published 30 November 2006.
 
After responding to all written ballot comments, and a 30-day default ballot, the OpenDocument [[international standard]] went to publication in ISO, officially published 30 November 2006.
   
  +
In 2006,<ref name=":0">{{Cite web|url=https://www.cnet.com/news/former-opendocument-advocates-bolt-for-w3c-standard/|title=Former OpenDocument advocates bolt for W3C standard|last=LaMonica|first=Martin|date=29 October 2007|website=[[CNET]]|publisher=[[CBS Interactive]]|url-status=live|archive-url=http://web.archive.org/web/20120418013056/http://news.cnet.com/8301-10784_3-9806369-7.html|archive-date=18 April 2012}}</ref> Garry Edwards, a member of OASIS TC since 2002,<ref name="Oasis_meeting">{{cite web|url=http://lists.oasis-open.org/archives/office/200212/msg00003.html|title=Meeting Minutes|date=December 16, 2002|publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|OASIS]]|accessdate=2007-11-01}}</ref> along with Sam Hiser, and Paul "Marbux" E. Merrell<ref name=":1">{{cite web|url=http://www.robweir.com/blog/2007/10/cracks-in-foundation.html|title=Cracks in the foundation|last=Weir|first=Rob|date=7 October 2007|website=An Antic Disposition|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=}}</ref> founded the OpenDocument Foundation. The aim of this project was be open-source representative of the format in OASIS.<ref name=":0" /><ref name=":1" /> The immediate aim of this project was to develop software that would convert legacy [[Microsoft Office]] documents to ODF. By October 2007 the project was a failure: Conversion of Microsoft Office documents could not be achieved.<ref name=":0" /> By this time, The foundation was convinced that ODF was not moving in a direction that they supported.<ref name=":2">{{cite web|url=https://www.zdnet.com/article/odf-infighting-could-help-microsofts-ooxml/|title=ODF infighting could help Microsoft's OOXML|last=Foley|first=Mary Jo|authorlink=Mary Jo Foley|date=29 October 2007|work=[[ZDNet]]|publisher=[[CBS Interactive]]|url-status=live <!--but its links aren't working properly-->|archive-url=http://web.archive.org/web/20071223005220/http://blogs.zdnet.com/microsoft/?p=875|archive-date=23 December 2007}}</ref> As a result, it announced the decision to abandon its namesake format in favor of [[W3C]]'s [[Compound Document Format]] (CDF), which was in early stages of its development.<ref name=":2" /><ref name=":0" /> The foundation, however, never acted on this decision and was soon dissolved. The CDF was never designed for this purpose either.<ref name="andy1">{{cite web|url=http://www.consortiuminfo.org/standardsblog/article.php?story=20071109070012244|title=Putting the OpenDocument Foundation to Bed (without its supper)|last=Updegrove|first=Andrew|date=9 November 2007|website=ConsortiumInfo.org|publisher=|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=}}</ref>
  +
  +
=== Further standardization ===
 
Further standardization work with OpenDocument includes:
 
Further standardization work with OpenDocument includes:
   

by Flowing dreams at October 12, 2019 10:20 AM

October 11, 2019

Global Floor Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Analysis 2019-2025 : Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - 12 Minute Book

October 11, 2019 07:36 PM

October 07, 2019

Swachh Bharat: Caste minorities in ODF declared villages still have no toilets - The News Minute

October 07, 2019 02:18 PM

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: 10 more videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2019

We’ve uploaded some more presentations from the recent LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain. First up, “Generating ODF reports on server side” with Jeff Huang:

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Then “How best to migrate to LibreOffice” with Andras Timar:

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“Grow out of nothing” with Wen-Ke Huang:

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“Agile LibreOffice: how not to lead an open source project” with BjĂśrn Michaelsen:

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“Recruiting is hard, let’s go shopping” with Ilmari Lauhakangas:

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“TDF’s Membership Committee: how does it work” with Gabriele Ponzo:

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“Handling TDF membership applications with the mcm-script” with Gustavo Buzzatti Pacheco:

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“LibreOffice Asia Conference 2019 Tokyo: what we achieved, and what’s next” with Naruhiko Ogasawara, Shinji Enoki and Jun Nogata:

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“Making LibreOffice a lifesaver for dying languages in Asia” with Kuan-Ting Lin and Xiao-Wu Wang:

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And finally, “The challenge of a regional LibreOffice Conference” with Gustavo Buzzatti Pacheco:

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More videos still to come!

October 07, 2019 01:53 PM

October 06, 2019

Four days after rural India declared ODF, MP woman leaves husband, demands toilet - The New Indian Express

October 06, 2019 07:00 AM

October 04, 2019

The ODF challenge - Daily Pioneer

The ODF challenge  Daily Pioneer

October 04, 2019 07:00 AM

October 03, 2019

CSE questions sustainability of ODF success - BusinessLine

October 03, 2019 05:26 PM

PM Modi declares India ODF, releases commemorative coins to pay homage to Mahatma Gandhi: 10 points - India Today

October 03, 2019 07:00 AM

October 02, 2019

Goa's ODF claims questioned, oppn alleges data manipulation - Daijiworld.com

October 02, 2019 07:00 AM

Bihar claims ODF status, announcement delayed - Daijiworld.com

October 02, 2019 07:00 AM

People slipping back to open defecation: CSE ahead of Centre's ODF India announcement - The New Indian Express

October 02, 2019 07:00 AM

October 01, 2019

With no proper loos, south Goa ODF on paper only - Times of India

October 01, 2019 07:00 AM

September 26, 2019

PM Modi will formally declare India as ODF on 2nd October - All India Radio

September 26, 2019 07:00 AM

September 25, 2019

OASIS

September 23, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: Videos from LibreOffice Conference 2019: OpenDocument Format

LibreOffice can open documents in many formats, including Microsoft Office files (.docx, .xlxs, .pptx). But it’s native file format is the fully open and standardised OpenDocument Format (ODF). At the recent LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Spain, community members gave presentations about news and updates for ODF. So, here are the first videos from the presentations (use headphones for best audio quality).

Firstly, Marina Latini and Italo Vignoli explain the COSM project – the Community of ODF Specification Maintainers:

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Version 1.3 of the ODF specification is being developed, and Michael Stahl provides some technical background:

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Finally, Svante Schubert introduces the new ODF Toolkit from The Document Foundation:

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Keep checking the blog – and our Twitter and Mastodon accounts – for more videos in the coming days and weeks!

September 23, 2019 01:54 PM

ODF Wikipedia Page

Monkbot: /* Support for OpenDocument */Task 16: replaced (1×) / removed (0×) deprecated |dead-url= and |deadurl= with |url-status=;

Support for OpenDocument: Task 16: replaced (1×) / removed (0×) deprecated |dead-url= and |deadurl= with |url-status=;

← Previous revision Revision as of 10:41, 23 September 2019
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* Information technology companies like [[Apple Inc.]], [[Adobe Systems]], [[Google]], [[IBM]], [[Intel]], [[Microsoft]], [[Nokia]], [[Novell]], [[Red Hat]], [[Oracle Corporation|Oracle]] as well as other companies who may or may not be working inside the OASIS OpenDocument Adoption Technical Committee.
 
* Information technology companies like [[Apple Inc.]], [[Adobe Systems]], [[Google]], [[IBM]], [[Intel]], [[Microsoft]], [[Nokia]], [[Novell]], [[Red Hat]], [[Oracle Corporation|Oracle]] as well as other companies who may or may not be working inside the OASIS OpenDocument Adoption Technical Committee.
 
* Over 600 companies and organizations promote OpenDocument format through The [[OpenDocument Format Alliance]].<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.odfalliance.org/members.php |title=ODF Alliance members |accessdate=24 May 2009 |work=ODF Alliance |url-status=dead |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20090403055912/http://www.odfalliance.org/members.php |archivedate=3 April 2009 |df=dmy-all }}</ref>
 
* Over 600 companies and organizations promote OpenDocument format through The [[OpenDocument Format Alliance]].<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.odfalliance.org/members.php |title=ODF Alliance members |accessdate=24 May 2009 |work=ODF Alliance |url-status=dead |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20090403055912/http://www.odfalliance.org/members.php |archivedate=3 April 2009 |df=dmy-all }}</ref>
* [[NATO]] with its 26 members uses ODF as a mandatory standard for all members.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.h-online.com/news/NATO-supports-ODF-open-document-format--/111127|title=NATO supports ODF open document format|first=Stefan|last=Krempl|publisher=The H Open|date=18 July 2008<!--, 15:28-->|accessdate=10 September 2012|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20090924190030/http://www.h-online.com/news/NATO-supports-ODF-open-document-format--/111127|archive-date=24 September 2009|dead-url=yes|df=dmy-all}}</ref>
+
* [[NATO]] with its 26 members uses ODF as a mandatory standard for all members.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.h-online.com/news/NATO-supports-ODF-open-document-format--/111127|title=NATO supports ODF open document format|first=Stefan|last=Krempl|publisher=The H Open|date=18 July 2008<!--, 15:28-->|accessdate=10 September 2012|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20090924190030/http://www.h-online.com/news/NATO-supports-ODF-open-document-format--/111127|archive-date=24 September 2009|url-status=dead|df=dmy-all}}</ref>
 
* The TAC (Telematics between Administrations Committee), composed of e-government policy-makers from the 25 [[European Union]] Member States, endorsed a set of recommendations for promoting the use of open document formats in the public sector.<ref name="ec.europa.eu">{{cite web|url=http://ec.europa.eu/idabc/en/document/3197.html|title=IDA promotes the use of open document formats for e-government interoperability|work=IDA Report 22|date=June 2004|publisher=IDABC|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
 
* The TAC (Telematics between Administrations Committee), composed of e-government policy-makers from the 25 [[European Union]] Member States, endorsed a set of recommendations for promoting the use of open document formats in the public sector.<ref name="ec.europa.eu">{{cite web|url=http://ec.europa.eu/idabc/en/document/3197.html|title=IDA promotes the use of open document formats for e-government interoperability|work=IDA Report 22|date=June 2004|publisher=IDABC|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref>
 
* The free office suites [[Apache OpenOffice]], [[Calligra]], [[KOffice]], [[NeoOffice]] and [[LibreOffice]] all use OpenDocument as their default file format.
 
* The free office suites [[Apache OpenOffice]], [[Calligra]], [[KOffice]], [[NeoOffice]] and [[LibreOffice]] all use OpenDocument as their default file format.

by Monkbot at September 23, 2019 10:41 AM

September 13, 2019

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Analysis, Growth, Size, Study, Demand & Forecast 2019-2025: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - The Industry Magazine

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Analysis, Growth, Size, Study, Demand & Forecast 2019-2025: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE  The Industry Magazine

Global “Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market” research report has all the necessary vital details asked by the clients or any audiences in terms of ...

September 13, 2019 01:31 PM

September 12, 2019

Slashdot

Arch Linux-based Manjaro 18.1.0 'Juhraya' Now Available With GNOME, KDE, or Xfce

An anonymous reader shares a report: Manjaro may have lofty goals of becoming a successful company, but let's be honest -- users of the Linux-based operating system don't really care about that. Don't get me wrong, I am sure most members of the Linux community are rooting for the newly-formed company's success, but they are probably more interested in the excellent operating system itself. Today, Manjaro Linux 18.1.0 "Juhraya" finally becomes available for download, and it isn't without some controversy. You see, rather than just offer up LibreOffice like most distributions, Juhraya offers an alternative choice at installation -- FreeOffice. "After six months of development, version 18.1 of Manjaro Linux is now available. Juhraya offers numerous improvements, especially with regard to Office productivity applications and package management. Another significant innovation in Manjaro 18.1 is the integrated support for FlatPak and Snap packages. For this purpose, the graphical package management tool 'bauh' (formerly known as 'fpakman' ) is now available to users," says Philip Muller, Manjaro developer.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

by msmash at September 12, 2019 08:50 PM

September 07, 2019

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market 2018 Global – Industry Size, Growth, Share, Segments and 2023 Forecast | 360 Market Updates - Denver News Press

September 07, 2019 07:00 AM

September 06, 2019

Planet KDE

New job, but no Akademy

NLnet

Since June of this year, I’m working for NLnet foundation. NLnet gives grants to people to improve the internet.

NLnet is growing because it is handling grants for European Next Generation Internet (NGI) programs. This means more funds for new search technologies and privacy enhancing technologies. Typical grants go towards the creation of materials (mostly software) that are made available under free licenses.

I’m honoured to have been asked for this position and will do my best for the success of the projects that we support.

The list of projects that received support from NLnet is very long. In the past I was lucky enough to get grants from NLnet to work on Calligra, WebODF, and ViewerJS.

Akademy

Akademy starts today, but alas, no akademy for me this year.

I’m celebrating my parents anniversary this weekend and will be at a water park instead of a warm bath of KDE-ers.

Luckily I can attend the new Linux App Summit in Barcelona in November which is back to back with RustFest. So I will not miss out on Free Software desktop conference this year.

My old friend and new colleague Michiel Leenaars is attending Akademy. He will be there to talk about the Next Generation Internet. Michiel will inspire the attendees to come work for an open internet with support from the EU and NLnet. His presentation is just after the Sunday keynote.

by Jos van den Oever (vandenoever) at September 06, 2019 12:00 AM

September 05, 2019

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Growth, Analysis, Demand & Forecast 2019-2025: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - TheGamingRadar

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Growth, Analysis, Demand & Forecast 2019-2025: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE  TheGamingRadar

Global “Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market” research report has all the necessary vital details asked by the clients or any audiences in terms of ...

September 05, 2019 04:28 AM

September 02, 2019

Swachh Bharat Abhiyan: PMC’s ODF plan goes off track along railway lines - The Indian Express

September 02, 2019 07:00 AM

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market Analysis, Size, Growth, Demand & Forecast 2019-2025: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - The Industry Updates

September 02, 2019 03:14 AM

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market Analysis, Size, Growth, Demand & Forecast 2019-2025: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - The Industry Updates

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market Analysis, Size, Growth, Demand & Forecast 2019-2025: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE  The Industry Updates

Global “Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market” research report has all the necessary vital details asked by the clients or any audiences in terms of ...

September 02, 2019 02:33 AM

September 01, 2019

Goa fudging data to declare villages as ODF: Congress - Daijiworld.com

September 01, 2019 07:00 AM

August 29, 2019

Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike to conduct audit of public toilets, eyes ODF tag - The New Indian Express

August 29, 2019 07:00 AM

August 27, 2019

IIT Patna signs MoU with water and sanitation committee for ODF, waste management in Bhojpur - Hindustan Times

August 27, 2019 07:00 AM

August 24, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice Hackfests

Most LibreOffice developers are working from their home offices, so hackfests provide a unique opportunity to spend some time working shoulder-to-shoulder with their peers. In 2018, LibreOffice developers and community members met at four hackfests in Brussels, Hamburg, Tirana and Munich.

Brussels (Belgium), February 5-6

The first hackfest of the year was organized at ICAB in Brussels immediately after FOSDEM, the largest European gathering of FOSS developers and advocates, which is organized every year at ULB (Brussels Free University) during the coldest weekend of the winter season. The hackfest was attended by over 30 people, equally split between those focused on development and those taking care of non technical tasks such as localization, documentation, certification and marketing. In term of development, there were achievements in various areas of the office suite and in quality assurance.

Hamburg (Germany), April 6-8

The community gathering started with a walk through the fascinating Hanseatic city of Hamburg, with its river, canals and lake in the centre (Binnenalster), and a sample of local food at the Groeninger Privatbrauerei.

On Saturday, around 45 people attended the hackfest, divided in two groups: the first focused on coding for fixing bugs and working on new features, and the second on the meeting of the German-speaking LibreOffice community. Developers worked on different topics, like making drawing layers ODF conformant, migrating old database to HSQLDB, speeding up VLOOKUP, and improving LibreOffice Viewer on Android, plus other random bits related to bugs, regressions and new features.

German community members discussed about bringing in potential new contributors, developing materials for courses (both online and in schools) about LibreOffice, and creating a new “Get Involved” flyer and page on the website, both in German. And at the end, we relaxed with drinks and food!

Tirana (Albania), September 27

As part of the LibreOffice Conference in Tirana, Albania, this “hacknight” was held at the Destil from 7:30PM to 11PM with over 100 participants, which have covered tasks such as development, localization, documentation, quality assurance, certification and marketing. In fact, the conference brings together a large number of community members from around the globe, and the hackfest is for many contributors the very first opportunity to meet face-to-face after months or even years of interaction on mailing lists and IRC.

Munich (Germany), October 26-28

In late October, CIB hosted a hackfest at modulE in Munich, Germany, with 25 participants over the three days. The meeting started with a few presentations on Friday evening, with Andreas Kainz showing the amazing progress on the NotebookBar design. During the event developers were able to fix several bugs and polish some new features for the upcoming LibreOffice 6.2 major release, while German community members discussed non-technical topics such as marketing and local events. Of course, there was Italian pasta, like in every hackfest in Munich. The meeting ended with a quick city tour and beer at the world-famous Hofbräuhaus.

August 24, 2019 08:52 AM

August 22, 2019

ODF Wikipedia Page

The RedBurn: Undid revision 889701012 by 202.142.113.99 (talk) (-spam)

Undid revision 889701012 by 202.142.113.99 (talk) (-spam)

← Previous revision Revision as of 18:40, 22 August 2019
Line 143: Line 143:
   
 
===Future===
 
===Future===
* '''''OpenDocument 1.3''''' (a.k.a. "ODF-Next") As of January, 2014, the current state of a possible future version of OpenDocument specification is a working draft (a preliminary unapproved sketch, outline, or version of the specification). The OASIS Advanced Document Collaboration subcommittee (created in December, 2010) is working on an update of OpenDocument change-tracking that will not only enhance the existing change-tracking feature set, but also lay the foundation for the standardization of [[Collaborative real-time editor|real-time collaboration]] by making change tracking compatible with real-time collaboration.<ref>{{citation |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office-collab |title=OpenDocument - Advanced Document Collaboration SC |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=http://www.robweir.com/blog/2010/12/odf-tc-creates-advanced-document-collaboration-subcommittee.html |title=ODF TC Creates Advanced Document Collaboration Subcommittee |date=2010-12-05 |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=https://fosdem.org/2014/schedule/event/real_time_compatible_odf_change_tracking/ |title=Real-time compatible ODF change-tracking |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>[https://www.kahootz.com/document-management/ Document collaboration]</ref>
+
* '''''OpenDocument 1.3''''' (a.k.a. "ODF-Next") As of January, 2014, the current state of a possible future version of OpenDocument specification is a working draft (a preliminary unapproved sketch, outline, or version of the specification). The OASIS Advanced Document Collaboration subcommittee (created in December, 2010) is working on an update of OpenDocument change-tracking that will not only enhance the existing change-tracking feature set, but also lay the foundation for the standardization of [[Collaborative real-time editor|real-time collaboration]] by making change tracking compatible with real-time collaboration.<ref>{{citation |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office-collab |title=OpenDocument - Advanced Document Collaboration SC |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=http://www.robweir.com/blog/2010/12/odf-tc-creates-advanced-document-collaboration-subcommittee.html |title=ODF TC Creates Advanced Document Collaboration Subcommittee |date=2010-12-05 |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref><ref>{{citation |url=https://fosdem.org/2014/schedule/event/real_time_compatible_odf_change_tracking/ |title=Real-time compatible ODF change-tracking |accessdate=2014-01-31}}</ref>
   
 
==Application support==
 
==Application support==

by The RedBurn at August 22, 2019 06:40 PM

August 20, 2019

Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Key Players Analysis 2019-2025 - Amazing Newspaper

Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Key Players Analysis 2019-2025  Amazing Newspaper

Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Scope of the Report: The worldwide market for Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) is expected to ...

August 20, 2019 02:29 AM

August 17, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: LibreOffice Conference 2020 Proposals

The Document Foundation has received two different proposals for the organization of LibOCon 2020 from the Turkish and German communities. When this has happened in the past, in 2012 (Berlin vs Zaragoza) and 2013 (Milan vs Montreal), TDF Members have been asked to decide by casting their vote.

This document provides an outline of the two proposals, which are attached in their original format.

TURKEY: ISTANBUL

City. Istanbul, formerly known as Byzantium and Constantinople, is the most populous city in Turkey and the country’s economic, cultural and historic center. Istanbul is a transcontinental city in Eurasia, straddling the Bosporus strait (which separates Europe and Asia) between the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea. With a total population of around 15 million residents in its metropolitan area, Istanbul is one of the world’s most populous cities, ranking as the world’s fourth largest city and the largest European city. (Source Wikipedia)

Entity. Tubitak Ulakbim (Pardus) will handle legal and financial responsibilities on behalf of LibreOffice Turkish community. Tubitak Ulakbim is a research institute which support FOSS (mostly Pardus Linux and LibreOffice) and ODF in Turkey, targeting primarily public institutions. Each year, it funds and/or supports many FOSS events in Turkey.
Tubitak Ulakbim (Pardus) has agreed to support the event by covering expenses up to an amount of approximately 25,000 Euro.

Venue. Boğaziçi University (BOUN), İstanbul. The main venue has three conference rooms of different sizes and a foyer area, plus other conference rooms in a nearby building (at walking distance) which can be used in case of need. All conference rooms are in the same campus. Almost all areas in the venue are wheelchair-accessible. BOUN is extremely sensitive to this topic.

Team. Muhammet Kara: main contact. Nurcan Tür, Enes Kıdık, Furkan Tokaç, F. Ahmet Kara, M. Çağrı Dolaz, Ülkem Kasapoğlu, Ömer Çakmak, Doğa Deniz Arıcı, Berkay Aktunç.

We are a group of enthusiast volunteers who love LibreOffice, and would like to see LibreOffice/ODF widely used and known in Turkey, along with other FOSS projects. We see LibOCon as a very good opportunity to integrate the local and the global community, with a positive impact on the local community.

LibOCon2020 Turkey Proposal

GERMANY: NUREMBERG

City. Nuremberg is the second-largest city of the German federal state of Bavaria after its capital Munich, with 511,628 inhabitants in 2016. The city lies about 170 kilometres (110 mi) north of Munich. (Source Wikipedia)

Entity. The organization is lead by the openSUSE community and it’s legally supported by SUSE.

Dates. The proposal is to organize the conference during week 42, from October 12 to October 18, 2020, including internal pre-meetings and conference. The geek number 42 is the “Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything”.

Venue. Z-Bau, a large building with many rooms of several sizes, and a large outdoor area with a beer garden. With four event rooms, two outdoor areas and various project rooms, there is plenty of room for events of all kinds. The entire area is barrier-free and the various rooms are equipped with basic technical equipment for events and day-to-day operations.

Team. Douglas DeMaio and Marina Latini: main contacts. Andrew Wafaa, Axel Braun, Simon Lees, Christian Boltz, Gertjan Lettink, Richard Brown.

2020 will be an important milestone date for both the LibreOffice and the openSUSE project. LibreOffice will celebrate its 10th birthday while openSUSE will achieve the 15th anniversary of the project. One more notable connection between the two communities is the historically strong relationship between the core LibreOffice development team and SUSE, given that a big number of core developers were all working together at SUSE.

LibOCon2020 Germany Proposal

August 17, 2019 04:00 PM

August 16, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Miklos Vajna: btLr text direction in Writer, part 4

The problem

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/meDrX3a3jwfCHpHSpQfS7Tqvy7Cxaumoo5RlnjJ7Qj0fhDgPXeOv7FgRn4Xqesv8IWW3feCV-_lhWOyzZo9ZD5yaxkBrYxd9doRm9x8BJAAdu3QQ1Jj6MIiy5q5FO_d2v5YSbsBUvg=w320

I already wrote about the btLr text direction in the context of Writer table cells as a result of a Collabora hack week (part 1, part 2, part 3). This post is meant to be the final one (for now), given that both table cells and shapes / text frames are now working nicely with all major formats.

The result

The first topic is that whenever I looked at supporting the new bottom-to-top, left-to-right direction, I always first checked if the more common top-to-bottom, right-to-left direction is working or not (this is used for e.g. Japanese rotated text). Turns out that Writer text frames were not exported to drawingML (part of DOCX), so I fixed that.

Similarly, there is the older shape markup in DOCX: VML. The tbRl direction from that was broken, too, now working nicely.

Then I could actually look at the btLr import from VML, which is now correct.

One of the motivations for this work was to get rid of the old, miserable hack where we did character-level rotation during import (which falls apart for multi-paragraph text). If the import mapping in itself is not painful enough, we had to undo the effect of this import hack at export time. When I could remove the last usage of this dreaded checkFrameBtlr() function in the export code, I mentally did a little dance. ;-)

Back to btLR fixing, exporting Writer text frames to DOCX is not interesting when you do DOCX editing, but it’s very much relevant when you do ODT → DOCX conversion. And the btLr case was of course not handled, fixed now.

RTF was broken in 4 different ways: import and export was broken for the btLr and the tbRl cases for text frames.

The last thing was the binary DOC export, where btLr text frames were not handled.

With these sorted out, I think the topic of table cells and shapes / text frames are now supported reasonably well. ODF could do the btLr writing direction for sections and pages as well, but I don’t see that as a priority. And hey, Word doesn’t support them, either. :-)

Want to start using this?

You can get a snapshot / demo of Collabora Office and try it out yourself right now: try unstable snapshot. Collabora is a major contributor to LibreOffice and all of this work will be available in TDF’s next release, too (6.4).

August 16, 2019 07:24 AM

August 15, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: LibreOffice Asia Conference Report: Part 2

How does your software affect the autonomy of countries?

Author: Kuan-Ting Lin – click here for part 1

Foreword: the LibreOffice Asia Conference was successfully held in May 2019 in Tokyo. Kuan-Ting Lin, a university student and civic tech reporter also attended this conference and gives his observations here. In Part II, Kuan-Ting starts with the Open Document Format, and expounds on how to form an open government and better autonomy of Taiwan.

The “Taiwanese Language channel” (tâi-gí-tâi) of the Public Television Service (PTS) in Taiwan started its broadcasting service in July 2019. This channel became possible only because the National Languages Act was approved in parliament. This policy was rooted by many in the decision to improve expression, alleviation of limits on speeches, and the consolidation of autonomy following the new law.

After a long-time struggle, the state also sees a silver lining regarding another autonomy issue: document liberation.

What kind of autonomy do we give up for proprietary software?

The LibreOffice Asia Conference held in Tokyo in late May focused on the developments in document liberation in Asian countries. Italo Vignoli, one of the co-founders of The Document Foundation (TDF) that is behind the software, showed a map in a presentation: each country is depicted larger or smaller than its actual size according to its software license trade numbers.

The result was not a surprise: the USA seemed like a giant, while others were squeezed into a bunch of lines. Countries around the globe spend a lot on software licenses – and Taiwan is no exception. Taiwanese people pay tens of billions of New Taiwanese Dollars solely for Microsoft products every year.

Only with respect to trade affairs, Taiwan’s dependency on software products made by single country is damaging its bargaining power and is a threat to economic autonomy. In terms of the autonomy of speech, we are facing an even more serious crisis.

World map for software licenses import. The US becomes an one-pixel wide line between Canada and the Latin America. (Credit: Italo Vignoli)

For thousands of years, our writing and thoughts could only pass on with the help of paper. Then computers replaced paper with digital documents in just a few decades. The difference between paper and digital documents is that the latter are merely some electrical signals which cannot be touched or seen. When users try to open and edit these documents, we need “formats” based on people’s consensus to understand the meanings of different combinations of these electrical signals.

Take “.doc” and “.ppt” files saved by Microsoft Office as examples: these two “formats” are controlled by Microsoft, so it can decide all the rules. The ways to display different fonts, images and languages are Microsoft’s call. As Microsoft Office evolves, paying users may still experience failure to open documents generated by old versions of the software – or see different layouts of the same document in different versions of the software.

In other words, if we do not follow Microsoft’s rules, the appearance of a digital document could alter faster than a piece of paper fades. What you want to say, and how you want your speech to be displayed – the essential freedom of expression and autonomy – are quietly taken away by some companies.

Open format or fake copycat?

To end the domination of formats by Microsoft, some companies, government agencies and communities designed the Open Document Format, or ODF in short, and included a detailed framework of digital document files in it. ODF soon became an ISO standard in 2006. ISO standards are open for everyone to use and are easy to access online, so different developers can all follow them easily. With ODF on the table, we finally came to a consensus on a unified format of documents.

Microsoft joined the party by announcing its “Office Open XML” format and making it another ISO standard in 2008. Having “Office Open XML” in their hands, Microsoft seemed just as open as the ODF. But it didn’t take long for communities to find out that Microsoft wasn’t that open.

The software giant admitted that ordinary users of Microsoft Office save “Office Open XML” files that are not the “strict version” of the format by default. Describing the ISO standard submitted by itself as a “strict version”, and then leading customers to save non-ISO standard files not only make the concept of open standards ironic, but also give people reasons to doubt if the company is really willing to promote open standards.

Franklin Weng, an open standards activist in Taiwan and a board member of TDF also added that some features inside files saved in the so-called “strict version” format in Microsoft products are actually similar to those in “non-strict version” formats. “TDF was studying Office 2016 a couple of years ago. Whether a file is saved as strict OOXML (i.e. Office Open XML) or not, there is no significant difference in terms of file size and lines of XML code.” Therefore, it is debatable how strict the “strict” version claimed by Microsoft actually is.

Length of XML content. As you can see, the XML line numbers of OOXML 2016 Strict and Transitional are nearly the same. What is really saved in OOXML Strict format? (Credit: Italo Vignoli)

Since open formats belong to the public, they has to remain stable and to have a set of progress to review new or modified features, then implement it as a standard extension, thus not matching the style of commercial enterprises, which tend to launch new versions and features frequently in order to stimulate consumption.

Therefore, it is understandable that Microsoft is passive towards promoting open formats. However, for governments and civil society institutions, using a document format with an arbitrary decision-making process, high frequency of change, and non-observance to open standards is definitely not a reasonable policy for documents. It not only leads to more chaos when people exchange files, but also causes more trouble in terms of preserving important information for a long time. Imagine if 500 years in the future, our descendants want to open .docx files from today, yet its complicated document structure doesn’t match the specification Microsoft provides; in that time, there may be no Microsoft engineers able to solve the problems.

A good open format transforms contributions by the community and fuels progress

The monopolised “open format” is regrettable, but the multi-partied ODF format is right here to fix the problem. “ODF is open to many technical companies and communities, and it is more discreet in terms of enacting or revising the standard, which makes immediate and arbitrary changes impossible,” Franklin said.

At the LibreOffice Asia Conference, Mark Hung from Taiwan was invited to give a speech in the opening session keynote. The topic was “LibreOffice CJK (Chinese, Japanese and Korean) Bugs, Fixes and Stories.” Since the majority of the LibreOffice developers are from Europe and South America, the developers, who are usually more familiar with Latin characters, can barely understand the system of logographic scripts and thus are very likely to make some mistakes. Nevertheless, it is at this time that the community can utilise the power of elasticity: the more diverse the cultural backgrounds of participants are, the more easily the problems caused by lack of understanding can be solved.

Mark is exactly such a participant. In 2014, Mark was working for an organisation of around 400 people, and was responsible for transferring the document system to community-developed free software. At first, facing the mistakes in Chinese, Korean, and Japanese characters and Mark’s colleague’s unfamiliarity with new software, Mark gradually developed an operational Q&A to help them solve the problems.

Mark Hung. (Photo credit: Masataka Kondo)

Mark also found out a way to solve a bug that had been disturbing him for a long time. “I was working on a document, and then I thought why not try to look into what’s inside the document? … I decided to try to submit my patch to LibreOffice and to my surprise my patch got reviewed in one day and then it got merged.” Mark therefore became a LibreOffice developer and a community member.

In his five years of volunteering, Mark has dealt with dozens of CJK issues. He even noticed some slight issues, such as the difference between Taiwanese Chinese and Japanese regarding the placement of phonetic markers. Dae-Hyun Sung, another community member from Korea, also showed regional distinction. Dae-Hyun’s presentation mentioned different ways of writing for South and North Korea. These examples show community-driven attempts to include all the differences, instead of limiting the freedom of writing.

Franklin points out that these new features will be treated as extensions first. If they work well then they will be included in a revised ODF format. The whole process ensures that the community’s voice is constantly reflected, and that the versions of the format remain stable.

Shaping a future for governments, free software and open formats to support each other

In Taiwan, ODF is accepted as a national standard of digital documents called ODF-CNS15251. There still are many government agencies and schools that are buying Microsoft Office licenses, but with help from the civil society, the National Development Council has started the “Advancing ODF-CNS15251 to Be the Standard Document Format for the Government” programme, and has been encouraging other parts of the government to replace Microsoft solutions with LibreOffice. The goal of document liberation has transformed from a “mission impossible” to a future that can be expected.

In large companies’ international business strategies, Taiwan is merely a small market and has relatively little attention. But having the opportunity to participate in the development of ODF and LibreOffice, Asian members can finally meet their own needs of document production by themselves. The significance of the LibreOffice Asia conference is that the Asian community has become part of the collective development of LibreOffice.

In Taiwan, facing the native language policies and official documents in the indigenous language programme, Taiwanese people are able to take advantage of the flexibility of LibreOffice to include indigenous languages and other native languages in the software’s built-in dictionary. Native languages can no longer be sacrificed under business interests of companies. And technology can start to be the thing that positively revitalises native languages, instead of the being something that marginalises them.

The National Development Council of Taiwan has started to collaborate with local companies that designed the “NDC ODF Application Tools” based on LibreOffice. But Franklin has a further suggestion: “It’s already a huge leap forward that the National Development Council invested in software development, but I hope they will give some feedback to the community. As for the ODF standard, the government should be part of its making.” The communities alone won’t sustain a proper standard. Having all the benefits of document liberation, the government has obligation to help build a better future. Having a voice in the development of an international standard can also highlight the autonomy that belongs to Taiwanese people.

Thanks to Kuan-Ting Lin for his write-up and perspectives on ODF and LibreOffice in Asia! And on the topic of conferences, everyone is welcome to join our upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain, from 10 – 13 September. See you there!

August 15, 2019 07:00 AM

August 14, 2019

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Top Players 2019 – 2025 : Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope – Rise Media - Rise Media

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Top Players 2019 – 2025 : Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope – Rise Media  Rise Media

The Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market report presents the worldwide Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) market size (value, ...

August 14, 2019 09:37 AM

August 13, 2019

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market Analysis, Size, Share, Study, Demand & Forecast 2019-2025:2023: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - Industry News Blog

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market Analysis, Size, Share, Study, Demand & Forecast 2019-2025:2023: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE  Industry News Blog

The Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) market research report provides important and latest industry data which covers the overall “Wall Mount Optical ...

August 13, 2019 06:57 AM

August 11, 2019

SBM 2.0 focussed on ODF sustainability: Govt - Down To Earth Magazine

August 11, 2019 07:00 AM

August 07, 2019

Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Will Generate New Growth By 2019 To 2024 - Global Reports USA

Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Will Generate New Growth By 2019 To 2024  Global Reports USA

A latest study released by HTF MI on Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market covering key business segments and wide scope geographies ...

August 07, 2019 06:24 PM

Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Will Generate New Growth By 2019 To 2024 - Global Reports USA

Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Will Generate New Growth By 2019 To 2024  Global Reports USA

A latest study released by HTF MI on Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market covering key business segments and wide scope geographies ...

August 07, 2019 06:24 PM

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market Strategic Insights 2019 – Hua Wei, 3M – Rise Media - Rise Media

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market Strategic Insights 2019 – Hua Wei, 3M – Rise Media  Rise Media

The Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market report presents the worldwide Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) market size (value, ...

August 07, 2019 11:06 AM

August 05, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: Community Member Monday: DaeHyun Sung

Today we’re talking to DaeHyen Sung from our Korean community, about opportunities and challenges for advocating LibreOffice and free software on the Korean peninsular‌

To start with, tell us a bit about yourself!

So, my surname is Sung, first name is DaeHyun (Korean Hangul notation: ě„ąëŒ€í˜„, Korean Hanja notation: ćˆĺ¤§é‰‰). I’m from the Korean peninsular’s south-east area, Gyeongsang Province (ę˛˝ěƒë„/慜尙道) region, Korea. Now, I live in the south-east side of Seoul (ě„œěš¸).

I’m Korean. My mother tongue is Gyeongsang dialect of Korean. But I can speaks Both Standard Korean [í‘œě¤€ë§ or í‘œě¤€í•œęľ­ě–´/ć¨™ćş–éŸ“ĺœ‹čŞž] and Gyeongsang dialect of Korean [ę˛˝ěƒë„ě‚ŹíˆŹëŚŹ or ę˛˝ěƒë°Šě–¸/慜尙斚言].

My Twitter ID is @studioego, and I’m also on Github: https://github.com/studioego

I contribute to improvements to Korean language support in free/libre open source software (FLOSS), mostly in my spare time. Also, I’m learning East Asian Languages (such as Mandarin Chinese, and Japanese).

This is because, three languages (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) use Chinese characters 柢字 (also called “ideographs”) and share a similar culture. I am curious as I study the commonalities and differences in the East Asian languages. I also like to visit some historic sites and take pictures in Korea.

What are you working on in LibreOffice at the moment?

My LibreOffice activities are about improving Korean features, bug reporting (Quality Assurance), translating into Korean, and some other things. Two years ago, I found a bug in LibreOffice’s Korean Hangul/Hanja dictionary. Some Korean Hangul/Hanja dictionary contents are broken on LibreOffice – so I fixed and added content. In addition, I updated the Hangul/Hanja conversion dictionary on LibreOffice.

In Korea, many people have rarely used LibreOffice – so I found many bugs and missing feaatures. So my overall goal is fix and improve Korean languages in LibreOffice.

Is there anything else you’d like to work on in the future?

Along with improving Korean support in LibreOffice, I’d like to do it with other FLOSS projects.

The Korean language (Hangul[í•œę¸€]: í•œęľ­ë§/í•œęľ­ě–´ (these words are used in South Korea đŸ‡°đŸ‡ˇ), 쥰선말/쥰선어 (these words are used in North Korea đŸ‡°đŸ‡ľ), 우댏말 (this word is used neutrally in both Koreans and bt Korean expats, it literally means “our language”); Hanja[í•œěž/柢字]: éŸ“ĺœ‹ë§/ćœéŽŽë§/éŸ“ĺœ‹čŞž/ćœéŽŽčŞž) is an East Asian language spoken by about 80 million people.

It is the official and national language of both Koreas: the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) and the Republic of Korea (South Korea), with different standardized official forms used in each territory. It is also one of the two official languages in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture (연변 쥰선쥹 ěžěš˜ěŁź/ĺťśé‚ŠćœéŽŽć—č‡Şć˛ťĺˇž/ĺťśčžšćœé˛œć—č‡Şć˛ťĺˇž) and Changbai Korean Autonomous County (잼밹 쥰선쥹 ěžěš˜í˜„/é•ˇç™˝ćœéŽŽć—č‡Şć˛ťç¸Ł/é•żç™˝ćœé˛œć—č‡Şć˛ťĺŽż) of the People’s Republic of China [ä¸­čŻäşşć°‘ĺ…ąĺ’Œĺœ‹, Mainland China]. It is also used in Japan, Uzbekistan, Russia [it reads â€œĐšĐžŃ€Ń‘ ĐźĐ°Ń€â€ in Russian], Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, etc.

Also, the Korean language uses Chinese characters (柢字). It means “Sino-Korean vocabulary” or â€œí•œěžě–´(柢字語/Hanja-eo)” in Korean. It is similar to Japanese Kanji [ćź˘ĺ­—ă‹ă‚“ă˜]. So when you’re working on FLOSS, you have to consider both Chinese and Japanese as well as Korean and vice versa.

In future, If I have time, I want to do more research about the differences in Korean languages in South Korea đŸ‡°đŸ‡ˇ and North Korea đŸ‡°đŸ‡ľ.

How did you get involved with LibreOffice – and what was the experience like?

In 2017, I visited Taiwan’s FLOSS Conference, COSCUP (Conference for Open Source Coders, Users and Promoters) as the Korean FLOSS Contributor.

At that time, I had already contributed Linux character maps applications – both GNOME (gucharmap) and KDE (kcharselect). Then I attended COSCUP at National Taiwan University, in Taipei, Taiwan, and in 2017, I met TDF board members Italo Vignoli and Taiwan’s TDF members, Franklin Weng, Cheng-Chia Tseng and Jeff Huang. I also met a Japanese TDF member, Naruoka Ogasawara. When I watched Italo Vignoli’s presentation, it had a strong impression on me.

Then, Jeff Huang [Po-Yen Huang] invited me to the LibreOffice CJK Telegram group. So I joined the LibreOffice project in 2017. At that time, I installed and used LibreOffice for the first time. (When I was University student, I was used to OpenOffice. However, its compatibility was very low, so I had stop to using it.)

Last year, I met many of TDF members and Asian LibreOffice users in places such as Taiwan, Japan, Indonesian, Mainland China, etc. In February 2018, I met Japanese TDF member, Jun Nogata with KDE board member “Eike Hein”, KDE Korea members in Seoul. At that time, really I felt Jun Nogata’s passions for FLOSS.

Then, In August 2018, I heard and watched KDE Akademy 2018’s keynote. The keynote’s main topics were North Korea, FOSS in Both Koreas (North and South). In his keynote slide, he talked about Korean Expat challenges in Korea for using FOSS (for example, Korean input, fonts, banking, online transactions [maybe, Microsoft ActiveX technology is popular in Korea], and HWP [Hangul Word processor] files).

I think, In Korea, Microsoft’s product-friendly computing environment and proprietary software is popular (such as HWP), so many Koreans and expats in Korea think ALL FOSS is difficult to use. (Also, I personally feel that it is difficult to use FLOSS in Korea.)

In the presentation, I saw North Korea’s Linux distribution, Red Star OS (it’s based on KDE). Also, when I installed Red Star OS, I checked the office suite and found that it’s based on OpenOffice. In my opinion, Because of North Korea’s economic senctions, North Korean people mainly use FLOSS. I found the bugs in Red Star’s office suite – so I thought, I would have to work hard on the LibreOffice project.

Also, when I attended COSCUP, GNOME.Asia and openSUSE Asia summit 2018 in Taipei, Taiwan, I met other TDF members from Asia (such as LibreOffice Taiwan Team, Japan Team, Indonesia Team, etc). Then I met LibreOffice Indonesia team members at LibreOffice Asia Meetup in A+A Space, Taipei. I was impressed by the enthusiasm of Indonesian open source users and contributors to open source.

Also, In December, 2018, I attended Japanese meetups: OSC 2018 Fukuoka and the 8th Kyushu LibreOffice study meetup [珏8ĺ›žäšĺˇžLibreOffice勉埡䟚]. I met three contributors from Africa who are currently living in Japan. First time, I’m curious about African Open Source Contributors. Also I felt even more passion for FLOSS.

Finally, what do you see in the future for LibreOffice? What does it need most?

If LibreOffice does not have feature enhancements for Korean users, I think that using the ODF format and document liberation movements in Korea will be impossible. Also the future for LibreOffice is not good regarding the Korean language. In Korea, the HWP format is still widely used HWP – and the share of Microsoft doc formats is still low. HWP format is the de facto standard official document format for the public sector and schools in Korea.
OpenOffice and LibreOffice can only open HWP files only if they were created with Hangul ’97 – newer versions of HWP files cannot be opened with these applications.

Recently, the government of the Republic of Korea Government announced that they will “use ODF insteadd of the HWP format”. But it’s only a slogan – and they only use draft documents officially on web-based document management systems. When I read the article, ”Taiwanese government standardises on true ODF document format”, I really admired the Taiwanese FLOSS activists and contributors.

Thanks DaeHyun Sung! And to everyone reading this: you can also give our community a hand and help to spread the word about free software and open standards. See our “What Can I Do For LibreOffice” site to get started!

August 05, 2019 02:32 PM

August 01, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: LibreOffice Asia Conference Report: Part 1

Free And Open Source Software (FOSS) Is Gradually Developing Its Commercial Ecosystems In Asia

Author: Kuan-Ting Lin
Translator: Franklin Weng

Foreword: the LibreOffice Asia Conference was successfully held in May 2019 in Tokyo. Kuan-Ting Lin, a university student and civic tech reporter also attended this conference and gives his observations here. In Part I, Kuan-Ting provides readers who are not familiar with FOSS, the Open Document Format (ODF) and LibreOffice a view about how FOSS communities work, and how FOSS grows its business opportunities and ecosystems.

On June 18, 2019, almost all of the government agencies in Taiwan’s cabinet received an official document from the National Development Council (NDC). “When exchanging digital documents between government agencies, the file format used shall be the Open Document Format (ODF) if the transferred files are editable‌ Do not use proprietary editors to directly save as ODF files‌ It is highly recommended to use the NDC ODF Application Tools or LibreOffice to generate standard ODF files.”

“This is the most exciting and cheering official document in recent years!” said Dr. Chao-Kuei Hung, a Science and Technology Studies (STS) researcher and inveterate FOSS promoter. In the document, users in Taiwan government agencies are asked to not use proprietary office suites like Microsoft Office to generate documents, and therefore not save and spread “.doc” or “.docx” format files, which people are quite familiar with.

Instead, they are asked to use free and open source software – which lets people to download, research, improve and redistribute it – like LibreOffice. They need to save and transfer documents in ODF format, which is an ISO standard (see the upcoming part II of the report for details). For most people, this seems to be a confusing policy; however, it will surely affect our lives in the future. For us, it is even as important as metric units like kilograms or meters.

In 50 Years, From Microsoft To Communities, There Are Huge Software Ecosystem Changes In The Taiwanese Government

The story begins more than 50 years ago. In the late 1960s, the Taiwanese central government introduced the first batch of computers for tax data registration. This purchase started the era of Taiwan’s digital government. With the increasing burden of people using computers, the government had been constantly buying and installing huge numbers of Microsoft product licenses, the majority of which were Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office. Such unrestrained purchasing and use of Microsoft software had made the government a subject of criticism by the parliament and the supervisory court more than a decade ago.

Legislators held a press conference in 2002 to question the administrative system, and pointed out that the Ministry of Justice had “illegally allowed Microsoft’s bid rigging”. At the time, Minister Ding-nan Chen replied that he would “wait for other software to achieve a certain degree of universality and compatibility,” and then the Ministry of Justice “would not rule out considering adopting it”, which clearly suggested that options other than Microsoft were simply not sufficient for the government at that time.

The fact that the Taiwanese government’s editorial policy changed from the early conservative mentality to today’s announcement of abandoning Microsoft’s commercial solutions proves that a free and open source office suite, developed by the community, has already been able to establish its own “ecosystem”. Companies in different fields in this ecosystem provide various government information services, while meeting the government’s high requirements for stability and security. However, here is an interesting question: Aren’t FOSS community members against the concept of commercial companies and software? Why do they set up their own company in the ecosystem?

The Formation of a FOSS Ecosystem

Let’s get back to the end of May 2019. Many LibreOffice community members gathered together in Tokyo to attend the first LibreOffice Asia Conference, and discuss how LibreOffice – which was born and grown up in Europe – could develop in Asia, where the culture and policies are quite different.

Franklin Weng from Taiwan, the only Asian member in the Board of Directors of The Document Foundation (TDF) – the legal charity entity behind LibreOffice – was there too. Franklin has been deeply involved in the Taiwanese FOSS community, and is also one of the founding members of Software Liberty Association Taiwan (SLAT). In early years he simply contributed and promoted FOSS in government agencies and schools as a volunteer community member. Nevertheless, through these years he realized that it wasn’t enough. “Business and policies needs to push each other. Now LibreOffice and ODF are slowly moving toward this direction: Policy goes first, and then gradually forms the business model.”

Franklin started his own business a few years ago, which helps the public sector and other organizations to adopt FOSS solutions. Through the community’s connections and long-term accumulated trust, Franklin’s team has successfully co-worked with the National Development Council (NDC), the Yilan County Government, and many other central agencies in the Taiwanese government to provide training courses and consulting services.

The lecturers who work with Franklin are mostly freelancers and are also involved in the FOSS community as deeply as he is. Therefore, besides teaching skills for using LibreOffice, the lecturers would also share free software concepts and issues with users from government agencies.

The integrity of FOSS ecosystems also depends on the integration of other fields. Shigenobu Koufugata, a member of the Japanese community who lives in Chiba, Japan, purchases old computers, installs high-performance, low-cost free software, and then resells the renovated solutions to consumers.

Users of second-hand computers often lack certain computer knowledge. Therefore, if they can use the computers straight after buying them, they can avoid the high threshold of downloading and installing additional software. Shigenobu believes that this can naturally attract more users to try LibreOffice.

In addition to software training and hardware support, software development is of course indispensable to the ecosystem. Italo Vignoli, one of the co-founders of TDF, stated clearly: “Our main assets are developers.” LibreOffice has hundreds of developers since everyone can participate; however more than half of the development contributions are made by employees of companies such as Collabora, CIB and Red Hat. By developing the required features or customized versions of LibreOffice for customers, these companies can direct profits and feedback to the community at the same time.

The Open Source Software Integral Institute (OSSII) in Taiwan is one of the few companies that provides LibreOffice business services in the Chinese-language area. One of its products is the “NDC ODF Application Tools” – a customized LibreOffice designed for users in the Taiwanese government – provided by the NDC in Taiwan. The CPC Corporation, Taiwan, a large state-owned enterprise (around 16,000 employees) with 73 years of history, is one of their customers.

At the LibreOffice Asia Conference, Mr. Wen-ke Huang, an employee in CPC who is responsible for the infrastructure information systems and ODF adoption, shared his experiences and analyzed the reasons and methods for adopting ODF and NDC ODF Application Tools.

In contrast to Microsoft’s ecosystem, where companies are mainly selling licenses and external add-ons, FOSS allows anyone to contribute code and even publish their own customized versions. This enables community members to participate into the core aspects of software development. Besides, the growing demands for FOSS application training and second-hand hardware also encourages community members who are expert in different fields to join the ecosystem.

Commercial Company That Is Loyal To The Community

Unlike normal commercial software companies, FOSS-related companies would keep thinking about their responsibilities as members of the community while making a profit. Making money is one thing, but since the community is the original motivation of the company’s founding, the two must cooperate with each other.

The first LibreOffice Asia Conference follows this thought. “I asked the Japanese community about hosting the first LibreOffice Asia Conference, because I found that they have a very good and active community, and hence can go further to find appropriate business models,” said Franklin. “When I attended LibreOffice Kaigi or similar events in Japan and presented what we have done in Taiwan, they always showed their envy and said that it was very difficult to promote LibreOffice and ODF in Japan. However I think that they’re doing very well; they just need to start thinking and finding more business opportunities. So the topic of the first LibreOffice Asia Conference was business. I hoped that after the discussions in the business workshop and certification interview, they have more confidence to start moving to business.”

“Running an FOSS-related company gives me not only the ability to contribute without any worries in the community, but also to find business opportunities for other community members from our experience, and to use the operating principles to consolidate the FOSS ecosystem on the ground,” Franklin explained additionally.

Although commercial companies in the LibreOffice ecosystem can contribute to the community while having profits, the relationship between the company and community is not one-way assistance. Sometimes it can be tough if the relationship between the two is not good.

An obvious example is the former OpenOffice.org community and Oracle. A few years beforehand, Oracle acquired Sun and hence a large amount of OpenOffice.org’s development fell into Oracle’s hands. It was dangerous because Oracle has never been friendly to FOSS, so some core OpenOffice.org community members decided to fork LibreOffice and founded The Document Foundation. “That’s why they chose a foundation as the form of the organization. TDF emphasizes the independence of the organization, very much due to the previous troubles with Oracle,” said Franklin.

Italo described the differences between the OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice communities. “We reverted the paradigm,” said Italo. “This is OpenOffice, the company protects the project. So it’s like when it rains, if you are under the umbrella you don’t get wet. We reverted the umbrella (for LibreOffice), and this is the concept of the mixing bowl‌ We jump into a bowl and we have every one of us moving in the same direction.”

The independence of the community is not only reflected in the organizational form. Although the development work is mainly carried out by commercial companies, TDF still dominates and makes decisions about the direction of the community and software development.

In order to maintain this independence and avoid conflicts of interests, the statues of TDF stipulates that the composition of the Board of Directors and Membership Committees must not have more than one-third of its members belonging to a single company or organization. With such rigorous management, communities and companies can find the right balance for each other.

Ideals And Business Can Cooperate Through Certification

At the end of the LibreOffice Asia Conference, the TDF’s Certification Committee held a public interview with several candidates from Taiwan and Japan. As long as these candidates were approved by the committee, they would become “LibreOffice Certified Professional Trainers”, which implies the expert skills and abilities to teach LibreOffice; or “LibreOffice Certified Migration Professionals”, to assist organizations to adopt and migrate to LibreOffice.

For TDF, these certified migration professionals and professional trainers are important ways to promote the concept and develop business. “I invited the LibreOffice Certification Committee to attend this conference and talk about business. I hope to discuss with the community about what can be done, and what can be noticed when training,” said Franklin, who has been a certified migration professional and professional trainer since 2016.

Eric Sun, a TDF member and a candidate in the certification interview this time, won unanimous approvals from the committee and became a certified migration professional and professional trainer. Eric used to work in the Open Source Software Application Consulting Center (OSSACC), a project under SLAT, to promote FOSS and public domain educational resources in schools. He then co-worked with Franklin to promote ODF/LibreOffice and has been the ace lecturer in Franklin’s team. Becoming certified by TDF can no doubt bring him more credits and opportunities, both for business and for promoting FOSS.

LibreOffice will be ten years old next year. TDF was founded in the shadow of a large commercial company at that time, but those members who set up the foundation may not have expected that the seed of document liberation and LibreOffice can be spread across the sea, to the distant lands in Asia, and set roots in the ground there, with a philosophy of equal emphasis on ideals and profits.

August 01, 2019 02:46 PM

Goa to be made ODF by August 31: Chief Minister - Daijiworld.com

Goa to be made ODF by August 31: Chief Minister  Daijiworld.com

Panaji, Aug 1 (IANS): Goa Chief Minister Pramod Sawant on Thursday said the government's target is to make the state Open Defecation Free (ODF) by August ...

August 01, 2019 07:00 AM

July 30, 2019

ODF Wikipedia Page

Citation bot: Alter: quote, title. Removed accessdate with no specified URL. Removed parameters. | You can use this bot yourself. Report bugs here.| Activated by User:Chris Capoccia | Category:Pages using citations with accessdate and no URL.

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← Previous revision Revision as of 22:06, 30 July 2019
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The '''Open Document Format for Office Applications''' ('''ODF'''), also known as '''OpenDocument''', is a [[Zip_(file_format)|ZIP]]-compressed<ref>Extract an odt file with unzip on Linux to see the actual resource hierarchy</ref> [[XML]]-based [[file format]] for [[spreadsheet]]s, [[chart]]s, [[Presentation program|presentations]] and [[word processor|word processing]] documents. It was developed with the aim of providing an open, XML-based file format specification for office applications.<ref>{{cite web |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/office/charter.php |title=OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) TC |publisher=Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards |date=19 January 2005 |accessdate=6 October 2013}}</ref>
 
The '''Open Document Format for Office Applications''' ('''ODF'''), also known as '''OpenDocument''', is a [[Zip_(file_format)|ZIP]]-compressed<ref>Extract an odt file with unzip on Linux to see the actual resource hierarchy</ref> [[XML]]-based [[file format]] for [[spreadsheet]]s, [[chart]]s, [[Presentation program|presentations]] and [[word processor|word processing]] documents. It was developed with the aim of providing an open, XML-based file format specification for office applications.<ref>{{cite web |url=https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/office/charter.php |title=OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) TC |publisher=Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards |date=19 January 2005 |accessdate=6 October 2013}}</ref>
   
The standard was developed by a technical committee in the [[OASIS (organization)|Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] (OASIS) consortium.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office |title=OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) TC |publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]]}}</ref> It was based on the [[Sun Microsystems]] specification for [[OpenOffice.org XML]], the default format for [[OpenOffice.org]] and [[LibreOffice]]. It was originally developed for [[StarOffice]] "to provide an open standard for office documents."<ref>{{citation |url=http://xml.coverpages.org/openoffice-xml_specification_draft200012.pdf |format=PDF |title=StarOffice XML File Format Working Draft, Technical Reference Manual, Draft 9, December 2000 |date=December 2000 |accessdate=2010-08-08}}</ref>
+
The standard was developed by a technical committee in the [[OASIS (organization)|Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]] (OASIS) consortium.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=office |title=OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) TC |publisher=[[OASIS (organization)|Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards]]}}</ref> It was based on the [[Sun Microsystems]] specification for [[OpenOffice.org XML]], the default format for [[OpenOffice.org]] and [[LibreOffice]]. It was originally developed for [[StarOffice]] "to provide an open standard for office documents."<ref>{{citation |url=http://xml.coverpages.org/openoffice-xml_specification_draft200012.pdf |title=StarOffice XML File Format Working Draft, Technical Reference Manual, Draft 9, December 2000 |date=December 2000 |accessdate=2010-08-08}}</ref>
   
 
In addition to being an OASIS standard, it was published as an [[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]/[[International Electrotechnical Commission|IEC]] international standard ISO/IEC 26300{{snd}} Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument).<ref name="odf12-part1"/><ref name="odf12-part2"/><ref name="odf12-part3"/><ref name="odf10"/><ref name="iso.org">{{citation |url=http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=59302 |title=ISO/IEC 26300:2006/Amd 1:2012 – Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.1 |date=8 March 2012 |accessdate=12 April 2012}}</ref><ref name="http">{{cite web |url=http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=59302 |title=ISO/IEC 26300:2006/DAM 1 – OpenDocument v1.1 |accessdate=29 March 2011}}</ref>
 
In addition to being an OASIS standard, it was published as an [[International Organization for Standardization|ISO]]/[[International Electrotechnical Commission|IEC]] international standard ISO/IEC 26300{{snd}} Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument).<ref name="odf12-part1"/><ref name="odf12-part2"/><ref name="odf12-part3"/><ref name="odf10"/><ref name="iso.org">{{citation |url=http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=59302 |title=ISO/IEC 26300:2006/Amd 1:2012 – Open Document Format for Office Applications (OpenDocument) v1.1 |date=8 March 2012 |accessdate=12 April 2012}}</ref><ref name="http">{{cite web |url=http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=59302 |title=ISO/IEC 26300:2006/DAM 1 – OpenDocument v1.1 |accessdate=29 March 2011}}</ref>
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{{Main article|OpenDocument technical specification}}
 
{{Main article|OpenDocument technical specification}}
   
The most common [[filename extension]]s used for OpenDocument documents are:<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html |title=UA.es |work=ua.es |language=es |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20090615185541/http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html |archivedate=15 June 2009 }}</ref><ref name="hg flat opendocument">{{cite web |url=http://www.ensode.net/roller/dheffelfinger/entry/openoffice_documents_version_control_with |title=OpenOffice.org Document Version Control With Mercurial |accessdate=7 June 2010}}</ref>
+
The most common [[filename extension]]s used for OpenDocument documents are:<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html |title=UA.es |language=es |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20090615185541/http://www.ua.es/en/rua/formatos.html |archivedate=15 June 2009 }}</ref><ref name="hg flat opendocument">{{cite web |url=http://www.ensode.net/roller/dheffelfinger/entry/openoffice_documents_version_control_with |title=OpenOffice.org Document Version Control With Mercurial |accessdate=7 June 2010}}</ref>
   
 
* <code>.odt</code> and <code>.fodt</code> for [[word processor|word processing]] (text) documents
 
* <code>.odt</code> and <code>.fodt</code> for [[word processor|word processing]] (text) documents
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* [[Gnumeric]]<ref>{{cite web|url=https://help.gnome.org/users/gnumeric/stable/gnumeric.html#file-format-odf|title=File Formats|author=Eric Baudais & others|publisher=GNOME Documentation Project|work=The Gnumeric Manual, version 1.12|date=February 2014|accessdate=1 February 2018}}</ref>
 
* [[Gnumeric]]<ref>{{cite web|url=https://help.gnome.org/users/gnumeric/stable/gnumeric.html#file-format-odf|title=File Formats|author=Eric Baudais & others|publisher=GNOME Documentation Project|work=The Gnumeric Manual, version 1.12|date=February 2014|accessdate=1 February 2018}}</ref>
 
* [[Google Docs]]
 
* [[Google Docs]]
* [[IBM Lotus Symphony]]<ref name="register" /><ref>{{cite web|url=http://blogs.msdn.com/dmahugh/archive/2009/05/09/1-2-1.aspx |title=1 + 2 = 1?|author=Doug Mahugh|publisher=MSDN Blogs|date=10 May 2009<!-- 2:26 AM-->|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=http://symphony.lotus.com/software/lotus/symphony/help.nsf/ReleaseNotes|title=Symphony.lotus.com|work=symphony.lotus.com|deadurl=yes|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20090710011646/http://symphony.lotus.com/software/lotus/symphony/help.nsf/ReleaseNotes|archivedate=10 July 2009|df=dmy-all}}</ref>
+
* [[IBM Lotus Symphony]]<ref name="register" /><ref>{{cite web|url=http://blogs.msdn.com/dmahugh/archive/2009/05/09/1-2-1.aspx |title=1 + 2 = 1?|author=Doug Mahugh|publisher=MSDN Blogs|date=10 May 2009<!-- 2:26 AM-->|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=http://symphony.lotus.com/software/lotus/symphony/help.nsf/ReleaseNotes|title=Symphony.lotus.com|deadurl=yes|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20090710011646/http://symphony.lotus.com/software/lotus/symphony/help.nsf/ReleaseNotes|archivedate=10 July 2009|df=dmy-all}}</ref>
 
* [[Inkscape]] exports .odg
 
* [[Inkscape]] exports .odg
* [[KOffice]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://koffice.org/filters/1.6/|title=Koffice.org|work=koffice.org|deadurl=yes|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20080513125754/http://koffice.org/filters/1.6/|archivedate=13 May 2008|df=dmy-all}}</ref>
+
* [[KOffice]]<ref>{{cite web|url=http://koffice.org/filters/1.6/|title=Koffice.org|deadurl=yes|archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20080513125754/http://koffice.org/filters/1.6/|archivedate=13 May 2008|df=dmy-all}}</ref>
 
* [[LibreOffice]]<ref name="register" />
 
* [[LibreOffice]]<ref name="register" />
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2003]] and [[Microsoft Office XP|Office XP]] (with the Open Source OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://odf-converter.sourceforge.net/download.html#hRequirements|title=OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-ins for Office|accessdate=31 January 2014}}</ref>
 
* [[Microsoft Office 2003]] and [[Microsoft Office XP|Office XP]] (with the Open Source OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office)<ref>{{cite web|url=http://odf-converter.sourceforge.net/download.html#hRequirements|title=OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-ins for Office|accessdate=31 January 2014}}</ref>
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* [[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
* [[WordPad]] 6.1 (Windows 7) partial support.
 
* [[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
 
* [[Zoho Office Suite]]<ref name="register" />
Various organizations have announced development of conversion software (including ''plugins'' and ''filters'') to support OpenDocument on [[Microsoft]]'s products.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20060504015438308 | title=OpenDocument Foundation to MA: We Have a Plugin | date=4 May 2006 | accessdate=23 August 2006 | publisher=Groklaw}}</ref><ref>{{cite news | url=http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Microsoft_Office_to_get_a_dose_of_OpenDocument/0,130061733,139255766,00.htm | title=Microsoft Office to get a dose of OpenDocument | date=5 May 2006 | accessdate=6 December 2006|publisher=CNet}}</ref> {{asof|July 2007}}, there are nine packages of conversion software.<!--Commented out invalid reference<ref name="odf20070727"/>--> Microsoft first released support for the OpenDocument Format in Office 2007 SP2.<ref>{{cite web | title=Office 2007 SP2 Supports ODF | url=https://www.pcworld.com/article/164015/office_2007_sp2_supports_odf.html | date=28 April 2009 | publisher=PC World}}</ref> However, the implementation faced [[OpenDocument software#Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 support controversy|substantial criticism]] and the [[ODF Alliance]] and others claimed that the third party plugins provided better support.<ref name="sp2-fact-sheet">{{cite web|url=http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf |title=Fact-sheet Microsoft ODF support |accessdate=24 May 2009 |quote=''MS Excel 2007 will process ODF spreadsheet documents when loaded via the Sun Plug-In 3.0 for MS Office or the SourceForge “OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office,” but will fail when using the “built-in” support provided by Office 2007 SP2.'' |publisher=odfalliance |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20090611181719/http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf |archivedate=11 June 2009 }}</ref> Microsoft Office 2010 can open and save OpenDocument Format documents natively, although not all features are supported.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/starter-help/differences-between-the-opendocument-text-odt-format-and-the-word-docx-format-HA010355788.aspx|title=Differences between the OpenDocument Text (.odt) format and the Word (.docx) format|work=office.microsoft.com}}</ref>
+
Various organizations have announced development of conversion software (including ''plugins'' and ''filters'') to support OpenDocument on [[Microsoft]]'s products.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20060504015438308 | title=OpenDocument Foundation to MA: We Have a Plugin | date=4 May 2006 | accessdate=23 August 2006 | publisher=Groklaw}}</ref><ref>{{cite news | url=http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Microsoft_Office_to_get_a_dose_of_OpenDocument/0,130061733,139255766,00.htm | title=Microsoft Office to get a dose of OpenDocument | date=5 May 2006 | accessdate=6 December 2006|publisher=CNet}}</ref> {{asof|July 2007}}, there are nine packages of conversion software.<!--Commented out invalid reference<ref name="odf20070727"/>--> Microsoft first released support for the OpenDocument Format in Office 2007 SP2.<ref>{{cite web | title=Office 2007 SP2 Supports ODF | url=https://www.pcworld.com/article/164015/office_2007_sp2_supports_odf.html | date=28 April 2009 | publisher=PC World}}</ref> However, the implementation faced [[OpenDocument software#Microsoft Office 2007 SP2 support controversy|substantial criticism]] and the [[ODF Alliance]] and others claimed that the third party plugins provided better support.<ref name="sp2-fact-sheet">{{cite web|url=http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf |title=Fact-sheet Microsoft ODF support |accessdate=24 May 2009 |quote=MS Excel 2007 will process ODF spreadsheet documents when loaded via the Sun Plug-In 3.0 for MS Office or the SourceForge “OpenXML/ODF Translator Add-in for Office,” but will fail when using the “built-in” support provided by Office 2007 SP2. |publisher=odfalliance |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20090611181719/http://www.odfalliance.org/resources/fact-sheet-Microsoft-ODF-support.pdf |archivedate=11 June 2009 }}</ref> Microsoft Office 2010 can open and save OpenDocument Format documents natively, although not all features are supported.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/starter-help/differences-between-the-opendocument-text-odt-format-and-the-word-docx-format-HA010355788.aspx|title=Differences between the OpenDocument Text (.odt) format and the Word (.docx) format|work=office.microsoft.com}}</ref>
   
 
Starting with [[Mac OS X 10.5]], the [[TextEdit]] application and [[Quick Look]] preview feature support the OpenDocument Text format.
 
Starting with [[Mac OS X 10.5]], the [[TextEdit]] application and [[Quick Look]] preview feature support the OpenDocument Text format.
Line 225: Line 225:
 
* The default text processing applications in Windows 10 ([[WordPad]]) and Mac OS 10.9 ([[TextEdit]]) support OpenDocument Text.
 
* The default text processing applications in Windows 10 ([[WordPad]]) and Mac OS 10.9 ([[TextEdit]]) support OpenDocument Text.
   
On 4 November 2005, IBM and Sun Microsystems convened the "OpenDocument (ODF) Summit" in [[Armonk, New York]], to discuss how to boost OpenDocument adoption. The ODF Summit brought together representatives from several industry groups and technology companies, including Oracle, Google, Adobe, Novell, Red Hat, Computer Associates, Corel, Nokia, Intel, and Linux e-mail company Scalix (LaMonica, 10 November 2005). The providers committed resources to technically improve OpenDocument through existing standards bodies and to promote its usage in the marketplace, possibly through a stand-alone foundation.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://news.cnet.com/OpenDocument-format-gathers-steam/2100-7344_3-5942913.html|title=OpenDocument format gathers steam|author=Martin LaMonica|publisher=CNET News|date=10 November 2005<!-- 4:00 AM PST-->|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> Scholars have suggested that the "OpenDocument standard is the wedge that can hold open the door for competition, particularly with regard to the specific concerns of the public sector."<ref name="papers.ssrn.com">{{cite web|ssrn=1656616|author=Tony Casson|author2=Patrick S. Ryan|date=1 May 2006|title=Open Standards, Open Source Adoption in the Public Sector, and Their Relationship to Microsoft’s Market Dominance|publisher= Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> Indeed, adoption by the public sector has risen considerably since the promulgation of the OpenDocument format initiated the 2005/2006 time period.<ref name="papers.ssrn.com" />
+
On 4 November 2005, IBM and Sun Microsystems convened the "OpenDocument (ODF) Summit" in [[Armonk, New York]], to discuss how to boost OpenDocument adoption. The ODF Summit brought together representatives from several industry groups and technology companies, including Oracle, Google, Adobe, Novell, Red Hat, Computer Associates, Corel, Nokia, Intel, and Linux e-mail company Scalix (LaMonica, 10 November 2005). The providers committed resources to technically improve OpenDocument through existing standards bodies and to promote its usage in the marketplace, possibly through a stand-alone foundation.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://news.cnet.com/OpenDocument-format-gathers-steam/2100-7344_3-5942913.html|title=OpenDocument format gathers steam|author=Martin LaMonica|publisher=CNET News|date=10 November 2005<!-- 4:00 AM PST-->|accessdate=10 September 2012}}</ref> Scholars have suggested that the "OpenDocument standard is the wedge that can hold open the door for competition, particularly with regard to the specific concerns of the public sector."<ref name="papers.ssrn.com">{{cite web|ssrn=1656616|author=Tony Casson|author2=Patrick S. Ryan|date=1 May 2006|title=Open Standards, Open Source Adoption in the Public Sector, and Their Relationship to Microsoft's Market Dominance|publisher= Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.}}</ref> Indeed, adoption by the public sector has risen considerably since the promulgation of the OpenDocument format initiated the 2005/2006 time period.<ref name="papers.ssrn.com" />
   
 
*Different applications using ODF as a standard document format have different methods of providing macro/scripting capabilities. There is no [[macro language]] specified in ODF. Users and developers differ on whether inclusion of a standard scripting language would be desirable.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.linux.com/archive/articles/47935 | archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20110521183559/http://www.linux.com/archive/articles/47935 | archivedate=21 May 2011 | title=Macros an obstacle to office suite compatibility | author=Marco Fioretti | accessdate=11 May 2008}}</ref>
 
*Different applications using ODF as a standard document format have different methods of providing macro/scripting capabilities. There is no [[macro language]] specified in ODF. Users and developers differ on whether inclusion of a standard scripting language would be desirable.<ref>{{cite web | url=http://www.linux.com/archive/articles/47935 | archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20110521183559/http://www.linux.com/archive/articles/47935 | archivedate=21 May 2011 | title=Macros an obstacle to office suite compatibility | author=Marco Fioretti | accessdate=11 May 2008}}</ref>
Line 257: Line 257:
 
* [[Russia]]
 
* [[Russia]]
 
* [[South Korea]]
 
* [[South Korea]]
* [[Taiwan]]<ref>{{cite web |url=https://www.ndc.gov.tw/en/News_Content.aspx?n=0E2DCBAA6CB72F12&sms=B079565EECDD8520&s=33EF0883B81062FF |title=Promote Government’s Open Document Standards Develop New Value for Document Circulation |publisher=National Development Council Taiwan |date=9 June 2015}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |url=https://conference.libreoffice.org/assets/Conference/Aarhus/Slides/FranklinWeng.pdf |title=Successful Story: Migrating Libreoffice to I-Lan County Government |publisher=Franklin Weng |date=24 Sep 2015}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |url=https://conference.libreoffice.org/assets/Conference/Brno/weng-odf-migration-in-taiwan.pdf |title=Taiwan migration to ODF: progress, problems and what to do next |publisher=Franklin Weng |date=8 Sep 2016}}</ref>
+
* [[Taiwan]]<ref>{{cite web |url=https://www.ndc.gov.tw/en/News_Content.aspx?n=0E2DCBAA6CB72F12&sms=B079565EECDD8520&s=33EF0883B81062FF |title=Promote Government's Open Document Standards Develop New Value for Document Circulation |publisher=National Development Council Taiwan |date=9 June 2015}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |url=https://conference.libreoffice.org/assets/Conference/Aarhus/Slides/FranklinWeng.pdf |title=Successful Story: Migrating Libreoffice to I-Lan County Government |publisher=Franklin Weng |date=24 Sep 2015}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |url=https://conference.libreoffice.org/assets/Conference/Brno/weng-odf-migration-in-taiwan.pdf |title=Taiwan migration to ODF: progress, problems and what to do next |publisher=Franklin Weng |date=8 Sep 2016}}</ref>
 
|-
 
|-
 
!style="text-align:right;padding-right:0.5em;"| Europe
 
!style="text-align:right;padding-right:0.5em;"| Europe
Line 302: Line 302:
 
* [[Massachusetts]], United States<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Linux-and-Open-Source/Massachusetts-Verdict-MS-Office-Formats-Out/|title=Massachusetts Verdict: MS Office Formats Out |date=24 September 2005 |publisher=eWeek |accessdate=23 October 2012}}</ref>
 
* [[Massachusetts]], United States<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Linux-and-Open-Source/Massachusetts-Verdict-MS-Office-Formats-Out/|title=Massachusetts Verdict: MS Office Formats Out |date=24 September 2005 |publisher=eWeek |accessdate=23 October 2012}}</ref>
 
* [[Misiones]], Argentina
 
* [[Misiones]], Argentina
* [[Munich]], Bavaria, Germany<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.h-online.com/open/news/item/Munich-administration-switches-to-OpenDocument-Format-895415.html |title=Munich administration switches to OpenDocument Format |author=Stefan Krempl |date=5 January 2010 |quote="Open source OpenDocument Format (ODF) is now the main document exchange standard, with PDF being used for non-editable files."}}</ref>
+
* [[Munich]], Bavaria, Germany<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.h-online.com/open/news/item/Munich-administration-switches-to-OpenDocument-Format-895415.html |title=Munich administration switches to OpenDocument Format |author=Stefan Krempl |date=5 January 2010 |quote=Open source OpenDocument Format (ODF) is now the main document exchange standard, with PDF being used for non-editable files.}}</ref>
 
* [[Paraná (state)|Paraná]], Brazil
 
* [[Paraná (state)|Paraná]], Brazil
 
|}
 
|}

by Citation bot at July 30, 2019 10:06 PM

July 29, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: LibreOffice monthly recap: July 2019

Here’s our summary of updates, events and activities in the LibreOffice project last four weeks – click the links to learn more!

  • ODF (the Open Document Format) is the native file format of LibreOffice, and is a fully open and standardised format, ideal for long-term document storage. At the start of the month, we announced COSM – the Community of ODF Specification Maintainers, to hold funds and to retain editors to work at the ODF Technical Committee. The goal is to accelerate development of the standard, and build up experienced editors. Find out more here.

  • We put the next part of our Annual Report 2018 online! Our native language communities around the world help to improve LibreOffice and share knowledge – and their passion and dedication is wonderful. LibreOffice wouldn’t be what it is today without their great work!

  • Meanwhile, work continues on LibreOffice 6.3 (due to be released in early August), and our QA community organised a Bug Hunting Session. Give us a hand in future sessions to ensure that LibreOffice stays rock-solid!

  • We talked to Jun Nogata, who helps out with the Japanese Ask LibreOffice website, and is also involved in marketing and public relations for the Japanese community.

  • We already mentioned ODF earlier in this recap – well, also in July, we chatted to Regina Henschel about how the Open Document Format is developed, and how everyone can get involved.

  • Later in the month, we put another part of the Annual Report 2018 online: LibreOffice development. Check it out for a behind-the-scenes look at LibreOffice 6.2’s development process!

  • Members of the Canadian LibreOffice community set up LibreWaterloo, to improve their presence on the local scene.

Keep in touch – follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Mastodon. Like what we do? Support our community with a donation – or join us and help to make LibreOffice even better!

July 29, 2019 12:46 PM

July 26, 2019

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market Outlook 2019-2027: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - News Hours Today

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) Market Outlook 2019-2027: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE  News Hours Today

The Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame (ODF) market research report provides important and latest industry data which covers the overall “Rack Mount ...

July 26, 2019 08:07 AM

July 25, 2019

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Outlook 2019-2024: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - The Industry Updates

Global Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Outlook 2019-2024: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE  The Industry Updates

The “Wall Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market” has its complete summary provided in such a pattern that the reading is enough to get the gist of the ...

July 25, 2019 10:10 AM

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Outlook 2019-2024: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE - The Industry Updates

Global Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market Outlook 2019-2024: Hua Wei, 3M, Huber + Suhner, CommScope, SHKE  The Industry Updates

The “Rack Mount Optical Distribution Frame(ODF) Market” has its complete summary provided in such a pattern that the reading is enough to get the gist of the ...

July 25, 2019 09:49 AM

July 24, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: The First LibreOffice Latin America Conference is a success and achieved important community milestones.

Linguistic challenges, women’s participation in FOSS, interoperability, professional training, migration, scripting and much more were hot topics in the conference held at the Facultad Politecnica of the Universidad Nacional de Asunción, Paraguay.

By Daniel A. Rodriguez.

The event started internally on Thursday 18 with a translation sprint of the LibreOffice Guarani team, with the assistance of Olivier Hallot (Brazil), LibreOffice volunteer translator for Brazilian Portuguese.

The Conference opened to public on Friday 19 in a ceremony that gathered the Minister of the Secretariat of Linguistic Policies (SPL), Ladislaa Alcaraz de Silvero, Prof. Limpia Ferreira Ortiz, FP-UNA Vice-Dean, members of the GuaranĂ­ Culture Atheneum, Prof. Mag. Alcides Torres Gutt, Coordinator of the Translation Team together with Italo Vignoli and Gustavo Pacheco representing The Document Foundation and the LibreOffice Community.

“The LibreOffice Latin American Conference is an event not only of technology, it is also a space for the study of new forms of productive organization. It will deal with technical topics such as development and quality control, but also with successful cases of migration and, with special attention, the translation into GuaranĂ­, native of the American continent and official in Paraguay,” said the Vice-dean in her inaugural speech.

The conference initiative was declared of “Scientific and Technological Interest” by the Honorable Chamber of Deputies of Paraguay.

This regional conferences were carried out for 8 years in Europe and other continents, and for this time Paraguay was chosen as the venue, because it has a vibrant Free Software community, a special interest for the GuaranĂ­ language, and was completely organized by volunteers. Talks and workshops were held by speakers, members of the LibreOffice community, from Italy, Spain, Mexico, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Chile, Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay, from Thursday 18 to Saturday 20 of July at the Polytechnic Faculty of the National University of Asuncion in San Lorenzo campus.

The first presentations covered the Hispanic community, the reality of the companies linked to the FLOSS in Paraguay and the difficulties faced by women workforce in the technological field. An official photo of the participants followed.

Starting the afternoon Henry Castro (Bolivia) talked on the development and technical challenges of LibreOffice Online. He was followed by JosĂŠ Gattica (Chile) talk on “Migration to LibreOffice in a vulnerable school”. Simultaneously, Mauricio Baeza (Mexico) gave the workshop on macros in the computer lab.

Xiomara CĂŠspedes talked about the migration to LibreOffice and open document formats at the University of Costa Rica. She was followed by Renato Barsotti (Argentina) experience of the Faculty of Economics of the National University of Misiones (UnaM).

The next day morning, Olivier Hallot (Brazil) shared with the attendees the details about the importance of documenting the software. Simultaneously, Klaibson Ribeiro (Brazil) conducted the Calc workshop.

Italo Vignoli (Italy) talked about the characteristics of the LibreOffice community on a global scale, presenting graphs and figures to support the features and trends of the people involved in LibreOffice. He was followed after lunch by Xisco Fauli (Spain) on LibreOffice Development and Quality Control. At the same time, the certification team reviewed and approved the application of Rute Solipa (Portugal) for Professional Instructor and Xiomara CĂŠspedes (Costa Rica) as Certified Migration Consultant in a video call session with Lothar Becker (Germany), Italo Vignoli and Gustavo Pacheco.

Italo Vignoli returned to give two presentations, the first one explaining the certification policy of The Document Foundation and the second one addressing the importance of adopting and using open documents formats such as the ODF standard.

The conference ended with the testimony of the participating students and the general public about the personal gains from the themes and knowledge presented at the conference and, in particular, the individual commitment to create a genuinely Paraguayan LibreOffice community and focus on LibreOffice translated into guarani.

July 24, 2019 06:46 PM

Official TDF Blog: UK Government Digital Service joins The Document Foundation Advisory Board

Berlin, July 22, 2019 – The Document Foundation (TDF) announces that the UK’s Government Digital Service (GDS) has joined the project’s Advisory Board, effective immediately.

The Government Digital Service (GDS) is part of the UK Cabinet Office [1]. It leads the digital transformation of Government in the UK, helping people interact with government more easily and supporting government to operate more effectively and efficiently.

In July 2014, the UK Cabinet Office announced the selection of the Open Document Format (ODF) for sharing and viewing government documents.

The Open Standards Team within GDS support and encourage the use of open standards in government. Their aim is to help identify and contribute to open standards for software interoperability and to promote data formats that will help to meet user needs across the UK government and support the delivery of common components.

“GDS has been a long-term supporter of the adoption of Open Document Format, and their participation in the TDF Advisory Board represents a strong endorsement of the project’s commitment to the advancement of open standards and ODF”, says Simon Phipps, TDF Director.

John Strudwick, Interim Director for Service Design and Assurance at GDS, said: “GDS are delighted to have joined the Advisory Board of TDF. We believe that open standards are important in meeting the needs that users have of Government and that ODF plays a big role in helping to deliver this.”

TDF Advisory Board’s (AB) [2] primary function is to represent supporters of the project, and to provide the Board of Directors (BoD) with advice and guidance. In addition, the AB is at the kernel of the LibreOffice ecosystem, and as such is key to the further development of the project.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/cabinet-office
[2] https://www.documentfoundation.org/governance/advisory-board/

July 24, 2019 12:06 PM

July 16, 2019

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July 16, 2019 05:17 PM

July 13, 2019

Advisory for ODF-Plus launched - The Weekend Leader

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July 13, 2019 07:00 AM

Advisory for ODF-Plus launched - Daijiworld.com

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New Delhi, Jul 13 (IANS): Minister of State for Jal Shakti Rattan Lal Kataria on Saturday launched an advisory document on ODF Plus, and Swachh Gram ...

July 13, 2019 07:00 AM

July 11, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: What is the Open Document Format (ODF), and how is it developed?

Regina Henschel is a long-time member of the LibreOffice community, and has worked on ODF, the native file format of the suite. At our recent German community meetup, we talked to her about how ODF is developed, and how users can help to improve it…

Tell us a bit about ODF, and why it’s important…

Open Document Format is LibreOffice’s native file format. (If you have a file with a .odt, .ods, .odp or .odg extension, then it’s an Open Document Text, Spreadsheet or Presentation file or Graphic respectively.)

ODF is developed by OASIS, then submitted to ISO (the International Organization for Standardization), and then adopted as a standard. There is also a working group at ISO, which by the way also works on OOXML – which can then ask questions about development, and so on.

For ODF we are now working on version 1.3. We had a “feature freeze” last summer. We have come so far that everything we wanted to have in it is available in the “editor version”. Now we’re going to fine-tune it, then we’ll be back in summer – so that was a whole year. Then comes the coordination process at OASIS, so it usually takes two years until a new version of the standard is ready.

How do you decide which new features to add?

The feature has to be well defined, and that depends a little on how good the proposal you get is. There are some suggestions like: “We want to have a feature for Fourier transformations” – but nothing else! And then we say: as long as there is no implementation that actively handles it, we’ll postpone it for later. It’s not worth it, for a standards body to deal with a proposal like this, if there are no applications that are actually interested in it.

ODF exists as a “strict” standard, for features that are fully standardized, and then there is an “extended mode” in which you can try out new features in applications. They then run under their own namespace, and if that works, organizations can make a suggestion for OASIS, eg: “This feature works well for us, so please include this in the strict standard.”

Then others can say: “Yes, we want to do something similar, but it would be better for us if we didn’t call it X, but Y instead”. Or: “We need an additional attribute to make it work for us”, for example. In situations like that, the proposals are discussed.

For example, in LibreOffice, it’s now possible to specify the size of charts, independent of their labels. In the old standard, you could only set the size including the label. This means that when data changed and the label changed, the effect was that the size of the chart changed. So that’s been fixed in ODF 1.3.

There are also bugfixes, where there are things that are simply wrong, or that are not clear enough for implementation. For example, one thing that was really incorrect was to put the units “at” and “atm” on the same level – that was definitely wrong. And one time, a matrix form was wrong as well. So we work on fixes for these.

Can normal end-users help out?

Yes, you can be a “normal person”, so to speak, without being on any committee – you can still send something to the Technical Committee. There is a mailing list, and also a homepage, where you can get informed about the work of the committee. There you can also find a link to the mailing list – but you have to register, because of spam. Messages on this list are then read and answered by the Committee.

The second way to get involved is when the Committee is about to make a new version of ODF. This will then be made available for voting – and then there will be an official time for comments. There the regulations are a bit stricter; this is not voluntary, but the committee has to actually work on these comments. That should then give a qualified answer.

The next step where official participation takes place is at ISO. They have the same disclosure process again, where comments are collected accordingly. Then the Technical Committee gets a long list from ISO: “We have received these comments, please discuss them.”

So this is a process that is very open. That’s one of the reasons why I decided to join the Committee. It’s not that something happens in secret, and then suddenly there’s a standard – but rather, the process is totally comprehensible.

The other thing that interested people can see is the archives of the mailing lists – and there are weekly teleconferences too.

Thanks to Regina for all her help over the years! ODF – and other open standards – are incredibly important, especially for long-term data storage. Indeed, the UK government recommends using ODF, and has guidelines for using the format in organisations and companies. Also check out this presentation from Regina at FOSDEM 2018.

July 11, 2019 10:56 AM

July 03, 2019

The Document Foundation Planet

Official TDF Blog: Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice events and activities around the world

Community is awesome! By helping to translate and market LibreOffice around the world, native language projects bring enthusiasm and passion to the global community. Here’s what they did in 2018, taken from our Annual Report…


Albania – OSCAL

OSCAL is the annual international Open Source Free Software Conference in Albania dedicated to empowering Software Freedom, Open Knowledge, Free Culture and Decentralization. In 2018, some team, Membership Committee and Board members attended the event to meet local community members and discuss plans for the upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2018 (which is covered elsewhere in this report).


Austria – event

The GNU/LinuxDay event took place in Dornbirn, Vorarlberg, on 13th of October. Community members from LibreOffice and The Document Foundation were present, including Christian Lohmeier, Marina Latini, Florian Effenberger and Robert Einsle. They had a booth with various materials, and talked to visitors.


Brazil – documentation

In January, the Brazilian community announced the availability of the Getting Started Guide 5.2, with all innovations and enhancements from LibreOffice 5.2. The guide was an in-depth update of the 5.0 Getting Started Guide that was already translated into Brazilian Portuguese. The translation team was composed of IT professionals, translators, engineers, teachers and technicians: Chrystina Pelizer, Vera Cavalcante, Fábio Coelho, Túlio Macedo, Raul Pacheco da Silva, Valdir Barbosa and Olivier Hallot.


Cuba – Document Freedom Day

In April, The Document Foundation supported the Cuban LibreOffice community, represented by Carlos Parra Zaldivar, for Document Freedom Day 2018 in Holguín, on the opening day of the International Book Exhibition in the local library Biblioteca Provincial “Alex Urquiola”. LibreOffice is included in the Cuban GNU/Linux distribution Nova, and as such is part of the IT syllabus in all schools.


Cyprus – events

During the last weekend of the year (December 28-30), there was a series of events at Middle East Technical University Northern Cyprus Campus, organized by the METU NCC ACM Student Chapter. Most of the attendees were from the Computer Engineering department. All attendees completed the “getting started” part of LibreOffice development, while some of them submitted their patches to Gerrit, and some began preparing to do so.


Czech Republic – LinuxDays and OpenAlt

Zdeněk Crhonek and Stanislav Horáček attended the two biggest Czech FOSS events, LinuxDays in Prague and OpenAlt in Brno. There was generally positive feedback from users, interest in new features and what is going on. Also, there was discussion with someone from the National Technical Library in Prague (who enthusiastic about FOSS, migrated client computers to Linux and LibreOffice, and encouraging us to spread the word about it) and a representative of an organization trying to coordinate using FOSS in Czech municipalities (two towns running LibreOffice, with the intention to pay for some bug fixing).

Other meetups took place at these events: a meeting with the Slovak community (Miloš Šrámek and Andrej Kapuš) in Brno, a meeting with the Czech localization community (Mozilla, Linux distributions), discussing mainly the possibility of a new Czech dictionary, and a discussion with a marketing specialist who suggested ways to simplify the LibreOffice web page.

Apart from events, the Czech community worked continuous localization of LibreOffice’s user interface, website, help and marketing materials (press releases, video subtitles). There was also user support and moderation on the Czech “Ask LibreOffice” site.


France – workshops

The French community organised workshops for documentation, QA, and localisation. Inno³ kindly supported one workshop by hosting the community at ‘Le 137’, a coworking space near Gare du Nord in Paris. Participants gathered at a restaurant near there and then went to work all together on QA and localisation. They worked on fixing bugs and localising LibreOffice Online.


Germany – meetup, calls and events

Christian Lohmeier (LibreOffice’s release manager) and Mike Saunders (Marketing & PR) attended the Augsburger Linux-Infotag in southern Germany in April. They set up a booth which had a screen showing a video of LibreOffice 6.0, along with stickers and flyers encouraging people to get involved with the project. Mike gave a talk in German called “LibreOffice: where we’re from, where we’re going, and how to get involved”.

Up in northern Germany, the community had a meetup in Hamburg to discuss various ideas and issues in the project, such as attending more conferences in the German-speaking region, with a more targeted focus. For instance, instead of simply telling people what LibreOffice is (which most Linux users already know), the focus should be more clearly on bringing in potential new contributors. Some some “action items” were also defined, including the creation of a new “Get involved” flyer for events, and a German translation of the “Get involved” page on the website.

On November 13th, Florian Effenberger gave a presentation about The Document Foundation at HTW Dresden – a university for technical and scientific studies. This was part of a series of talks about free and open source software.

In addition, the German community organised regular calls (TelKos) to discuss upcoming events and ways to spread awareness about LibreOffice.


India – localisation sprint

Ten people participated in a localisation sprint in Kolkata, on November 11. Participants made contributions together for the Bengali-India locale. On November 4, there was pre-meetup on localisation portal basics: Biraj Karkamar gave the participants basic details on how to add suggestions and submissions in the portal. Also that day, participants created their profiles on the portal.

The main event started with introductions, then they had a short recap on the pre-meetup. Following that was hands-on portal. Biraj showed the style guide of the bn-IN locale translation, which is followed in open source localisation. Then the sprint started, which was almost five hours long. Biraj summed it up with: “it was good and productive. Of course, it was fun too!”


Indonesia – conference

The Indonesian community organised a conference about LibreOffice on March 25 and 26. It was hosted by Politeknik Elektronika Negeri Surabaya (PENS), and was first of its kind in South East Asia. On the day before the conference, the Indonesian LibreOffice community organized a localization workshop, led by Andika Triwidada, a long-time contributor who has coordinated the Indonesian localization for many years.

On the first day of the conference, in the morning. there was a meeting with a group of PENS’ IT professors, led by the university dean, where discussions took place about the opportunity of increasing the presence of open source software in their syllabus. In addition, the university is going to evaluate the migration to open source software and LibreOffice, including the migration to ODF as a way to overcome vendor’s lock-in.


Italy – conference and schools

Associazione LibreItalia, representing the Italian LibreOffice community, organized several events targeted at students – from primary schools up to universities – to educate them about free open source software and open document standards, and support the concept of “digital citizenship”. Several community members have been active in Northern and Central Italy, and have also targeted their communication efforts to parents.

In November, the community met in Sanremo for the fifth LibreItalia Conference, to discuss past activities and arrange new ones. The event was also an opportunity to meet the President of PA Social, the association representing social media managers of Italian public administrations, to talk about potential collaboration opportunities.


Japan – conference and meeting

On 13th December, at the Yahoo! Lodge (1-3, Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo), LibreOffice community members who are usually far away from one another met up for a chance to interact. At this event, participants had a question-and-answer session about translations, discussed some other topics, and prepared slides for the following day. Attendees included: Naruhiko Ogasawara, Shinji Enoki, Masaki Murakami Tomas Kapiye (from Namibia), Dieudonne Dukuzumuremyi (Rwanda), Hatem Wasfy (Egypt) Rin Nakamura and Atsushi Ueda.

On the following day, the LibreOffice Japanese team did a seminar. This time, the speakers were Tomas Kapiye, Dieudonne Dukuzumuremyi and Hatem Wasfy. One of the talks was about “How African students contribute to LibreOffice”.

During the year, Japanese community members contributed articles to websites and online magazines about their events, and new versions of LibreOffice.


Nepal – localisation sprint

The Nepalese LibreOffice community spent much of April 2018 localising the software, and at the end of the month, they had a meetup together with the Kathmandu University Open Source Club. For translations of LibreOffice, participants reduced the number of critical error strings from over 9000 down to 3808, while LibreOffice Online was completely localised during this event. In addition, the number of active contributors increased from 2 to 35. At the end of the event, participants received a certificate, thanking them for their help.


Hispanic community – Telegram channel

Many local LibreOffice communities have Telegram channels for communication. The Spanish Telegram channel was featured in MuyLinux online magazine; this brought a sizeable influx of new members and traffic.


Taiwan – meetup and Bug Hunting Session

A meetup was held in the evening on 11 August in A+A space, which is a nice and friendly space for FOSS communities, and also a community made up of several artists who use FOSS as their tools to create their artwork. The attendees included LibreOffice and other FOSS community members from Japan, Korea, Indonesia and Taiwan. Franklin Weng introduced the 30-second animation for LibreOffice Android Viewer, which was generated by LibreOffice Taiwan and A+A Space.

Rania Amina, who was responsible for visual design in the LibreOffice Conference Indonesia, showed his artwork to attendees, while Ahmad Haris also shared his experiences holding LibreOffice Conference Indonesia, which was a huge success. Shinji Enoki described the current status of Japanese support in LibreOffice, and many events held in Japan. Daehyun Sung introduced himself and shared some interesting things in Korea.
After this, attendees split into different groups and talked with each other. During this meetup, members from Japan and Indonesia showed interest in holding a LibreOffice Asia Conference. Besides conferences, attendees also exchanged experiences migrating to LibreOffice in organizations and public administrations.

On November 29, the Taiwanese community held a three-hour “LibreOffice Bug Triage Experience” event. A total of 70 students from National Cheng-Kung University and three members of The Document Foundation (Franklin Weng, Cheng-Chia Tseng and Jeff Huang) attended. First, Franklin introduced Bugzilla and the bug issue lifecycle. In this event the participants installed the daily build master version of LibreOffice and focused on three things: testing new reports, confirming bugs, and reproducing issues.
Students searched for these three kinds of bugs and randomly chose one to examine. The three TDF members helped and guided students during the whole session. In a short time, students found that it was a lot easier than they expected, so they were quite happy, excited and confident. The organisers estimate that in total, more than 100 bugs were confirmed/reported as not reproducible.


Turkey – events, Bug Hunting Sessions and training

In May, members of the Turkish community attended the Free Software and Linux Days 2018 in Istanbul. They had a booth, jointly run by LibreOffice Turkey and GNOME Turkey community members. During the event they gave out stickers to the visitors, and answered their questions about LibreOffice, GNOME, and Free/Libre Software in general. Community members also had a lot of time to chat, and to discuss the current situation and the future of the community in Turkey. Also at the event, attendees gave three talks: Being a LibreOffice Developer, LibreOffice Certifications, and The Open Document Format.

A couple of months later, the community organised a Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 6.1 Release Candidate 1, to find and fix issues before the final release in early August. Around 15 people were present, and they tested LibreOffice for three hours. Multiple bugs were discovered – some were reported, some were discussed, others were prepared for reports later. After the session, there was a long discussion about community and ecosystem building for LibreOffice in Turkey.

A second Bug Hunting Session took place in Ankara in November: eight people (including one remotely from Istanbul) participated in the live session, and participants tested LibreOffice 6.2 Alpha on Linux, Windows and macOS. The event started with self-introductions, and participants chatted for a short while, to get to know each other. Then Muhammet Kara, the organiser, went through the bug reporting and QA process briefly, and introduced the participants to LibreOffice’s Bugzilla installation. Several bugs were identified, and bug reports were created for them.

Lastly, Gökhan Gurbetoğlu organised some LibreOffice training in October. It was a two-day event and took place in İstanbul, as part of the Open Source in Public Institutions Conference’s local sessions (Kamu Açık Kaynak Konferansı). There were 25 trainees on both days; the first day started with a quick introduction to LibreOffice’s interface and continued with Writer. Then the second day was for Calc.


USA – OSCON

OSCON is the largest open source conference and exhibition in the United States. The event returned to Portland to celebrate its 20th anniversary in July, after a couple of years in Austin, Texas. The Document Foundation was given a free booth in the Non Profit Pavilion, and was represented by three enthusiastic volunteers – Robinson Tryon and Robin Haberman from the US, and Eric Bright from Canada – who had lots of good conversations with everyone from long-term users and supporters of LibreOffice, to those who were new to the whole concept of FOSS.


Wrapping up…

Of course, this report contains just a selection of native language project achievements in 2018 – so TDF would like to say a big thank you to everyone, across the planet, who is helping to make powerful productivity tools available to everyone, regardless of their location or mother tongue. Cheers!

July 03, 2019 11:35 AM